Law School Discussion

Can You Do Well on the Exam Despite Not Doing Well in Class?

Re: Can You Do Well on the Exam Despite Not Doing Well in Class?
« Reply #10 on: November 06, 2008, 01:16:39 PM »
so peeps that don't pay attention in class, i have a question.

do you outline? how do you study for the exam? i've never been a big class guy either. i get real bored and like to surf the net. i'm wondering if you use study aids, etc. what's your style?

Thistle

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Re: Can You Do Well on the Exam Despite Not Doing Well in Class?
« Reply #11 on: November 06, 2008, 01:25:48 PM »
so peeps that don't pay attention in class, i have a question.

do you outline? how do you study for the exam? i've never been a big class guy either. i get real bored and like to surf the net. i'm wondering if you use study aids, etc. what's your style?

with few exceptions, my exams have all been open book/note.  i try to make sure that i know where to find EVERYTHING on a moment's notice; as well as have the basics firmly committed to memory.

this means that i have outlines and tabs and tables of contents, cases and one line summary sheets.  flowcharts are also very important for me, being more of a visual learner.

for closed book, i just study the hell out of the outline.

thats about it, i cant really quantify it or give you something that would work for everyone....you will kind of have to figure out what works best for you

The Artist

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Re: Can You Do Well on the Exam Despite Not Doing Well in Class?
« Reply #12 on: November 06, 2008, 02:24:06 PM »
I have a question about breaking a rule into it's 'elements'.

For Torts this seems pretty easy. You just break it up into pieces, like battery is 1)intentional infliction of a 2)harmful or offensive 3) contact. Crim is pretty easy when you can use the MPC. But how do you do this for Contracts? When there is a UCC provision I understand how you would apply facts to the rules, but what about in common law? For example, can you break down a topic such as misrepresentation into elements? It doesn't mention this in the casebook, just the holdings of cases and the occasional Restatement/UCC citing.

Matthies

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Re: Can You Do Well on the Exam Despite Not Doing Well in Class?
« Reply #13 on: November 06, 2008, 04:11:40 PM »
so peeps that don't pay attention in class, i have a question.

do you outline? how do you study for the exam? i've never been a big class guy either. i get real bored and like to surf the net. i'm wondering if you use study aids, etc. what's your style?

For open book take homes I donít make any outline, I just refer to my briefs (I still book brief everything) and any notes I made in the margins along the way while I was reading plus and handout/power points the prof might have given out. Because Iím OCD I make a little binder where I put everything we got as handouts, old outlines, practice questions and answers (although I have never done the practice questions before the exam, I just read them plus the answers). If there is anything I donít understand Iíll refer to a hornbook before the test. For closed book exams I write out really short briefs for the cases and summarize the notes from the book and that with any handouts becomes my ďoutlineĒ for studying. Don't worry about what your classmates are doing or how they prep, just worry about finding the methoed that works for YOU, that in my book is the hardest part about 1L, figuring out how you study best, but once you do that, then its all down hill from there.

Matthies

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Re: Can You Do Well on the Exam Despite Not Doing Well in Class?
« Reply #14 on: November 06, 2008, 04:12:26 PM »
I have a question about breaking a rule into it's 'elements'.

For Torts this seems pretty easy. You just break it up into pieces, like battery is 1)intentional infliction of a 2)harmful or offensive 3) contact. Crim is pretty easy when you can use the MPC. But how do you do this for Contracts? When there is a UCC provision I understand how you would apply facts to the rules, but what about in common law? For example, can you break down a topic such as misrepresentation into elements? It doesn't mention this in the casebook, just the holdings of cases and the occasional Restatement/UCC citing.

God its been four years since I took contracts but I seem to remember there was a formula for contracts questions like:

Is there an offer?
Was the offer accepted?
Did anything happen to negate the offer?


Something like that, not really elements, but question you always have to answer for every contract. Sorry I donít remember more than that.

The Artist

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Re: Can You Do Well on the Exam Despite Not Doing Well in Class?
« Reply #15 on: November 06, 2008, 04:57:14 PM »
I have a question about breaking a rule into it's 'elements'.

For Torts this seems pretty easy. You just break it up into pieces, like battery is 1)intentional infliction of a 2)harmful or offensive 3) contact. Crim is pretty easy when you can use the MPC. But how do you do this for Contracts? When there is a UCC provision I understand how you would apply facts to the rules, but what about in common law? For example, can you break down a topic such as misrepresentation into elements? It doesn't mention this in the casebook, just the holdings of cases and the occasional Restatement/UCC citing.

God its been four years since I took contracts but I seem to remember there was a formula for contracts questions like:

Is there an offer?
Was the offer accepted?
Did anything happen to negate the offer?


Something like that, not really elements, but question you always have to answer for every contract. Sorry I donít remember more than that.


Thanks. I'll post a separate thread in hopes of eliciting more responses.  :)