Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: Does it hurt if you do worse?  (Read 1157 times)

broach911

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 25
    • View Profile
    • Email
Does it hurt if you do worse?
« on: October 25, 2008, 12:49:26 AM »
So I just got my score back, and thinking I would do much better the second time around, I find out I in fact did worse. Will this hurt my chances?

I went from a 161 first time, to a 158 second.

elsathermit

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 30
    • View Profile
    • The El Sat Hermit
Re: Does it hurt if you do worse?
« Reply #1 on: October 25, 2008, 02:22:09 AM »
of course it does.
(Oct 08: 172) (June 09: 177)

aed9

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 15
    • View Profile
Re: Does it hurt if you do worse?
« Reply #2 on: October 25, 2008, 08:58:48 AM »
You have to give them reason to believe your first test is more representative of your abilities. The scores are in the same scoring band, so it's easy to just lump them together and think you're typical ability is just under a 160.

kenpostudent

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 296
    • MSN Messenger - kenpostudent@hotmail.com
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Does it hurt if you do worse?
« Reply #3 on: October 25, 2008, 11:55:45 AM »
Doesn't the ABA require that schools take the higher score?

heartbreaker

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 3817
    • View Profile
Re: Does it hurt if you do worse?
« Reply #4 on: October 25, 2008, 12:09:57 PM »
Doesn't the ABA require that schools take the higher score?

It requires that schools report the higher score. Generally, it indisputably looks bad if you did worse on the retake. How severely that affects admission chances depends on the school and a whole load of other circumstances.

broach911

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 25
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Does it hurt if you do worse?
« Reply #5 on: October 25, 2008, 03:52:36 PM »
Doesn't the ABA require that schools take the higher score?

It requires that schools report the higher score. Generally, it indisputably looks bad if you did worse on the retake. How severely that affects admission chances depends on the school and a whole load of other circumstances.

What other circumstances? And any advice as to what I should do?

I'm considering taking it again but I really don't want to. Neither of my scores fell within my average while taking practice tests, so I feel they're not reflective, but I don't want to do worse, and I don't want to apply in December because I feel a later application will hurt me. How high would I have to get in December for it to counteract the bad score in Oct, and the late application?

kenpostudent

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 296
    • MSN Messenger - kenpostudent@hotmail.com
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Does it hurt if you do worse?
« Reply #6 on: October 26, 2008, 01:06:51 PM »
Doesn't the ABA require that schools take the higher score?

It requires that schools report the higher score. Generally, it indisputably looks bad if you did worse on the retake. How severely that affects admission chances depends on the school and a whole load of other circumstances.

From where are you getting your information?

heartbreaker

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 3817
    • View Profile
Re: Does it hurt if you do worse?
« Reply #7 on: October 26, 2008, 01:11:46 PM »
Doesn't the ABA require that schools take the higher score?

It requires that schools report the higher score. Generally, it indisputably looks bad if you did worse on the retake. How severely that affects admission chances depends on the school and a whole load of other circumstances.

From where are you getting your information?

From speaking to a bunch of adcoms (granted, mostly from T-14 schools, so it's a limited pool) at info sessions and whatnot - they more or less said that if you take the LSAT twice, you're expected to do better on the second time.

I do not know, however, how this translates into admissions - is it just a matter of perception? I imagine they still consider the highest score, does it put some blemish on the application package? The only thing I've been told is that retakes should be higher.

kenpostudent

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 296
    • MSN Messenger - kenpostudent@hotmail.com
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Does it hurt if you do worse?
« Reply #8 on: October 26, 2008, 09:11:40 PM »
Doesn't the ABA require that schools take the higher score?

It requires that schools report the higher score. Generally, it indisputably looks bad if you did worse on the retake. How severely that affects admission chances depends on the school and a whole load of other circumstances.

From where are you getting your information?

From speaking to a bunch of adcoms (granted, mostly from T-14 schools, so it's a limited pool) at info sessions and whatnot - they more or less said that if you take the LSAT twice, you're expected to do better on the second time.

I do not know, however, how this translates into admissions - is it just a matter of perception? I imagine they still consider the highest score, does it put some blemish on the application package? The only thing I've been told is that retakes should be higher.

I can see the logic in your argument. I guess it would depend on magnitude of the spread between the two scores. Anything more than a five point spread between the two scores would probably raise some eyebrows. If you were otherwise qualified for admission (maybe on the cusp), I don't think the second score would necessarily disqualify you. In deciding between two very similar applicants, the second score might be the straw that tips the scales in the other candidates favor. Who can really say? The admissions game is so subjective.

If I were in that position, I would work to shore up any and all weaknesses in the remaining parts of my app... then, start sacrificing virgins to a different god everyday! Get the favor of as many deities as possible. You will need it.

broach911

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 25
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Does it hurt if you do worse?
« Reply #9 on: October 27, 2008, 12:17:59 AM »
I think I'm actually going to go for a third shot and take it in December and apply in Jan. I just hope the risk pays off.