Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: Splitter w/ a family to consider  (Read 1414 times)

ljl3y

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 92
    • View Profile
Splitter w/ a family to consider
« on: August 17, 2005, 07:16:03 PM »
(Also posted on apps board, someone suggested I post here too.)

I am the breadwinner in my family, supporting a 2 year old and a stay-at-home dad, with another son almost ready to join us.  New York is expensive, and we can't really afford it here anymore.  I'm looking forward to living in a smaller town for a few years while going to law school, but I'm still a fan of NY, would like to preserve the opportunity to come back here after LS and be able to afford it.  Do I really need to go to a T14 school to be able to work in NYC?

I'd love to hear opinions on my chances at the following law schools, stats: 2.96 / 173, 5 ys WE

Dream: UVa (went there for undergrad, have family in C'ville and I want to go home!)
Other reaches if $ avail for apps: Northwestern, Georgetown, Duke
Realistic?: Emory, Fordham, UC Hastings
Safety: U of Richmond, UConn

As a splitter, do I need to apply to more schools?  We soooo do not have money to burn on apps, but I don't want to limit my options.

I'd love to hear from anyone else out there with a family to consider.  Does anyone have opinions on the affordability and kid-friendliness of these cities or schools? Any plans or experiences with balancing parental and student responsibiliites?
173/2.97
5 yrs WE NY Law Firm
Non-trad (2 sons)
C'ville-bound!

IN: VIRGINIA (off the WL)!!! Wisconsin($), W&L($), Fordham PT, Richmond($, w/d), UIUC($$, w/d), Cardozo($$, w/d), Miami (w/d), Hastings($, w/d)
OUT:Chicago, NYU, Columbia
WL: Michigan, Emory, Fordham FT, W&M, UT Austin, Vandy

XYZZY

  • Guest
Re: Splitter w/ a family to consider
« Reply #1 on: August 17, 2005, 07:20:49 PM »
have you considered syracuse?  the cost of living there is dirt cheap and they also have part-time.  yea, they're rather third tier toilet, however, if they place in NYC it might be something to consider.  their career services department for UG students is excellent, so not sure how this extends to law school.

(edit) or George Mason? closer to Centerville i believe, plus in-state tuition (and part-time)

InVinoVeritas

  • LSD Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 5550
  • Fine! I shall also fix zee hobo suit!
    • AOL Instant Messenger - NVinoVeritasChi
    • View Profile
Re: Splitter w/ a family to consider
« Reply #2 on: August 17, 2005, 10:27:08 PM »
the general strategy for splitters (esp those with a high LSAT score) is to cast a wide net, particularly if you're looking for scholarship money.  my suggestion would be to apply to schools where your LSAT score is significantly above the reported 75th percentile.  i understand that you don't have money to burn for applications, but you'll likely get a handful of fee waivers from schools that'll interest you, and in the long run, applying to a wide variety of schools could save you money.

good luck!

lincolnsgrandson

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 160
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Splitter w/ a family to consider
« Reply #3 on: August 17, 2005, 11:22:14 PM »
I know people at Fordham with numbers like that.  And you should include Brooklyn Law, Cardozo and St. John's.  One of them might offer you scrill. Where in New York do you live?

And I offer the same advice I have reinforced here before - you're going to have worry less about what law school you can get into as you will about what kind of law student you're going to be. 

Hastings is a crapshoot, because the UC's care more about GPA than LSAT.  And you don't want to move to the Bay Area for less than Hastings. 

newhopeful

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 119
    • View Profile
Re: Splitter w/ a family to consider
« Reply #4 on: August 19, 2005, 12:28:45 AM »
I just wanted to provide some insight on living in Atlanta and going to Emory.  I think you have a good shot of getting in with your LSAT score.  I am working with someone over there and she said anything over 170 would almost make you a shoe-in (as long as you didn't blow the rest of your application).

Atlanta is a great city, very diverse and growing extremely fast.  There are great school systems in some of the surburban counties (I have give you details on that if you PM me).  There is a lot to do their for you and your significant other as well.  The cost of living for the size city and the things to do is great compared to some other major cities.  I am sure, coming from NY, you would find prices really reasonable.

I am not sure if Emory will be really recognized in NY, but I know they are well known for their Criminal Law programs.

~newhopeful
Nontrad, URM, 5 yrs WE, LSAT=176, UGPA=2.5 (had a terrible first transitional year, completing UG in 3 years)

http://www.lawschoolnumbers.com/display.php?user=newhopeful

ljl3y

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 92
    • View Profile
Re: Splitter w/ a family to consider
« Reply #5 on: August 19, 2005, 09:58:21 AM »
Thanks to everyone for the great advice.

(Today is my last day in the office before going on maternity leave, and I have so little to do - hence the long post...)

I am intrigued by the question raised as to what kind of law student I (and maybe some of the other non-trads and/or splitters here) would be.  I do have several semesters of academic success; the bad GPA is a result of two terrible years when I was just out of high-school. I also have a natural intelligence and logical ability which is a good fit for this type of academia.

Further, in my experience many of the kids just graduating from college, though they may have experience in earning good grades, are often lacking that extra oomph of intelligence and political savvy which is so important to success in the field.  Certainly, a few times I have trained a staff member right out of college who had a natural intelligence and sophistication, but more often I see it develop over time.  Note that I'm not trying to suggest that these students are less bright!  I am only highlighting that they are currently in a different stage of life, one which is a little more narrow in focus than the one I am in.

It is important to me to attend a "good" school, full of bright students. I mean students who are bright in an academic sense as well as a personal sense.  I very much want to be around other students who can think clearly in an academic setting.  Therefore, I am attracted to schools with a student body earning high LSAT scores, etc.  I also want the most opportunities for myself and my family upon completion of law school.

On the other hand, I would certainly appreciate a school at which some of the students were able to converse on a more mature level.  My priorities are simply not the same as a 4.0 180 Harvard-bound 22 year-old.  The ordinary fact of being a parent changes things, in too many ways to begin to list here. Anyway, I can't pretend that I will be able to give 100% all the time at law school.  My life is simply not completely my own anymore.  However, I'm up for the challenge!

I'd love to hear others' thoughts on this topic.
173/2.97
5 yrs WE NY Law Firm
Non-trad (2 sons)
C'ville-bound!

IN: VIRGINIA (off the WL)!!! Wisconsin($), W&L($), Fordham PT, Richmond($, w/d), UIUC($$, w/d), Cardozo($$, w/d), Miami (w/d), Hastings($, w/d)
OUT:Chicago, NYU, Columbia
WL: Michigan, Emory, Fordham FT, W&M, UT Austin, Vandy

upNdown

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 636
  • My favorite bike - cheap, ugly, heavy, and fun.
    • View Profile
Re: Splitter w/ a family to consider
« Reply #6 on: September 12, 2005, 12:16:51 PM »
As a fellow married parent of a 2 year old, with a second on the way, sole breadwinner, and anticipated splitter (haven't take the TEST yet, but my practice scores indicate I'll have a large split) I can tell you the kind of things I've been thinking about. 

From what I've heard, the success you have in law school (and the contacts you make) are as important as tier when it comes to getting a job.  I'm not saying that if you do well in a T4, you have a shot at the same jobs as somebody at the bottom of their T1 class, but I am saying that merely graduationg from a T1 won't guarantee you that dream job - you've got to do well. So in addition to chosing a the best situation academically and financially, you need to set yourself up to succeed.

With that in mind, I'll ask you a few questions.  How will you support your family while you're in law school?  Will you be working?  Will your husband be working?  If you're working, even part time, that may compromise your abilities to excel in your first year at a T1.  If your husband is working, will you be able to study, or will you be spending too much time feeding and cleaning and doing all those things we parents do every day?

As far as relocating goes, do you have a support system of parents, relatives and/or friends in your present location.  Will you have any sort of support system wherever you are locating?  This is so important, because kids get sick, jobs run late, you know how it is.  I can't imagine trying to manage 1st year of law school without (as Ringo put it) a little help from my friends. 

I'm not sure what I'll be doing because I don't even know if I'll be a full-time student or a part-time student.  But either way, I'm prepared to take out loans for living expenses and to ask for a lot of help. 
GPA - 2.095 (It was a long time ago and I wasn't trying.)
LSAT - 161

In - Suffolk, New England School of Law
Out - BC, Northeastern
Pending - Nothing pending . . . now what?

molly2004

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 12
    • View Profile
Re: Splitter w/ a family to consider
« Reply #7 on: October 05, 2005, 09:28:00 AM »
Forgive me.  I'm new to this board.  What's a splitter?


upNdown

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 636
  • My favorite bike - cheap, ugly, heavy, and fun.
    • View Profile
Re: Splitter w/ a family to consider
« Reply #8 on: October 05, 2005, 12:21:41 PM »
Forgive me.  I'm new to this board.  What's a splitter?



A splitter is somebody with a high LSAT score and a low GPA or a low LSAT and a high GPA.  I've also seen the term used to describe somebody who took the LSAT twice with radically different scores, but this is less common.
GPA - 2.095 (It was a long time ago and I wasn't trying.)
LSAT - 161

In - Suffolk, New England School of Law
Out - BC, Northeastern
Pending - Nothing pending . . . now what?