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Author Topic: transfer question  (Read 1571 times)

ByronHadley

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Re: transfer question
« Reply #10 on: October 21, 2008, 01:47:22 PM »
hello...

i am at the relatively new law school, Elon University.  needless to say, there is no reputation as the school's first graduation won't take place until next year.  it's a good school, though, good people.

i am in the middle of my second semester of my first year.  i have a 3.1 gpa, putting me in the top 25%.  i have already passed the patent bar. 

i am just looking for some thoughts about my transfer potential.  first, do i have a shot at a place like DePaul or Kent?  second, do i even have a shot at a place like John Marshall Chicago or maybe Stetson?  third, would it even be better for me at John Marshall? 

really, i'll work anywhere.  location isn't the most important thing. 

the most important thing is putting myself in the best POSSIBLE position for success.

thoughts?


With the patent bar behind you I would not worry about suceeding.  You will be fine coming from any school.

Are you kidding me?

Patent bar or not, I hate to break it to you but Biglaw doesn't do much recruiting from Elon or the other above mentioned schools.

Thinking long term instead of like the typical law student, whether BigLaw does or doesn't recruit from Elon is not that significant. 

The rules are changing.  But nobody's telling that to the kids.   

TheDudeMan

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Re: transfer question
« Reply #11 on: October 21, 2008, 01:52:58 PM »
News flash: I'm not a kid.  I've been working for 5 years for the Feds.  Maybe it's just me, but going to law school to make $50k seems like a complete waste.  I make just under 6 figures now, and that is in government.  Why bother putting yourself through hell to go make under $45k working for some crap firm?

And what rules are changing?  Come out of the clouds.  Small firms are never going to compete with large ones.  It's simple economics.  The larger firms have the breadth and depth to absorb economic turmoil while the small firms that specialize go under.