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Author Topic: How Important Are My LSAT Scores?  (Read 11986 times)

non parata est

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Re: How Important Are My LSAT Scores?
« Reply #40 on: October 10, 2008, 06:44:37 PM »
Post 'em!  Post 'em Post 'em Post 'em!
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Well he's had it in for me ever since I kinda ran over his dog... Well, replace the word "kinda" with "repeatedly" and the word "dog" with "son."

non parata est

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Re: How Important Are My LSAT Scores?
« Reply #41 on: October 10, 2008, 07:30:09 PM »
Ha!  Gold!
Quote from: Lionel Hutz, Esq.
Well he's had it in for me ever since I kinda ran over his dog... Well, replace the word "kinda" with "repeatedly" and the word "dog" with "son."

Jamie Stringer

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Re: How Important Are My LSAT Scores?
« Reply #42 on: October 10, 2008, 08:31:46 PM »
That PM is probably the most f-ing worthless comment I've ever read on LSD.

And that's something.
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SilenceSeaAndSky

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Re: How Important Are My LSAT Scores?
« Reply #43 on: October 11, 2008, 02:13:52 AM »
Hey everyone,

   I'm back to @#!* with you.  It's refreshing to see that so many people were rankled at my initial comments.  Clearly I am a feminine hygiene product who desires only to @#!* with the bad ass Law School Discussion community. Your logical reasoning has persuaded me towards a conclusion of which I was previously unaware.  Please continue to debase me.  I wouldn't expect anything less.  And I don't want anything more. 

Pardon Johnny Cash,

I'm questioning their logic because I'm trying to see just how truthful their claims can be.  So much of what people have said seems to be insufficient based on the evidence alone.  If it were sufficient, then I would not complain or react like I have.  I'm not trying to berate them, but trying to expand on their chain of logic.  I don't claim to have perfect knowledge, which is why I'm posting on this site.  Maybe you are correct, but f-ing show it! 

Lindbergh,

  Thanks for your answer.  I believe that the LSAT is quite possibly the most important factor, and that a decent Master's MIGHT actually mean at least something, which seems quite reasonable.  Take care. 

non parata est

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Re: How Important Are My LSAT Scores?
« Reply #44 on: October 11, 2008, 02:29:30 AM »
I don't think he realizes that we have a record of what he said earlier, and that him just wondering innocently if "a decent Master's MIGHT actually mean at least something" isn't at all consistent with that.

Also, 20 points to whoever knows what the hell "expand on their chain of logic" means.
Quote from: Lionel Hutz, Esq.
Well he's had it in for me ever since I kinda ran over his dog... Well, replace the word "kinda" with "repeatedly" and the word "dog" with "son."

bloomlaw

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Re: How Important Are My LSAT Scores?
« Reply #45 on: October 11, 2008, 03:29:01 AM »
Hey everyone,

   I'm back to @#!* with you.  It's refreshing to see that so many people were rankled at my initial comments.  Clearly I am a feminine hygiene product who desires only to @#!* with the bad ass Law School Discussion community. Your logical reasoning has persuaded me towards a conclusion of which I was previously unaware.  Please continue to debase me.  I wouldn't expect anything less.  And I don't want anything more. 

Pardon Johnny Cash,

I'm questioning their logic because I'm trying to see just how truthful their claims can be.  So much of what people have said seems to be insufficient based on the evidence alone.  If it were sufficient, then I would not complain or react like I have.  I'm not trying to berate them, but trying to expand on their chain of logic.  I don't claim to have perfect knowledge, which is why I'm posting on this site.  Maybe you are correct, but f-ing show it! 

Lindbergh,

  Thanks for your answer.  I believe that the LSAT is quite possibly the most important factor, and that a decent Master's MIGHT actually mean at least something, which seems quite reasonable.  Take care. 


Whoa. You are jumping to conclusions there. I never said you wanted to @#!* with people. I only said you were a DB, nothing more. I just think your arrogant head is stuck so far up your ass that you can't tell left from right.

Thistle

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Re: How Important Are My LSAT Scores?
« Reply #46 on: October 11, 2008, 09:06:59 AM »

Whoa. You are jumping to conclusions there. I never said you wanted to @#!* with people. I only said you were a DB, nothing more. I just think your arrogant head is stuck so far up your ass that you can't tell left from right.


at that depth, does it really matter?

he still hasnt answered my question, nor provided any evidence to support his claims.  we have pointed him multiple times towards LSN, but, who can trust that site, everyone there MUST be lying.  or else its us, we created multiple accounts to discourage him from applying at top schools.

why would he care how "truthful our claims can be"; or seek to "expand on our chain of logic"? arrogant douchebaggery of the highest order.  no one was rankled at his initial comments; it was his condescending and superior replies that pissed everyone off.

at this point, there is no response that he can provide that would not subject him to being eaten again by the mockasaurus.  one cannot believe that his expected payoff is anything less than extra tickets on the titanic.

so, one and all, let us admit our error.  rather than debasing the op, let us laud his accomplishments and wish him well in this cycle, remembering that the cost of applying to every school in the t14 = $1010.00.

money well spent.  you'll get in everywhere you apply.


 

 

non ex transverso sed deorsum


JD

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Re: How Important Are My LSAT Scores?
« Reply #47 on: November 24, 2008, 04:50:44 PM »
Dennis,

   Physics is inherently more difficult than most or every discipline.  If social sciences are so easy, can you give me any insight into the relationship between culture, language and thought?  Or the relationship between economics, culture, and individualism in Western Europe from 1400 to the present?  Have you read Jurgen Habermas, the theories of Gary Becker, Marilyn Strathern, or Adorno?  People like you do not need to comment on subject matter that is well-respected by individuals far more emminent than you will ever be (think Paul Wolfowitz, Milton Friedman and Ben Bernanke).

Dude- you have some legitimate questions that you are asking but you come off as an absolute jerk.  First of all, this is a site populated by people obsessed with applying to and getting into the best law school possible.  So, it should be assumed that everyone knows what U Chicago is and how good of a rep it has (this is referencing your earlier claim that people think it is just some state school).  Second, you do know that political science is one of the most common undergrad major going to law school, right?  In all likelihood a good portion of people on this board have degrees in some sort of social science, and just as good a portion could give you a decent answer to your questions.  Most people here have probably read at least one of those people you mention (not all; there are 100s of big-name scholars you could have filled in for Habermas, Friedman, etc.; we all have different focuses and interests thus read different things).

Comparing physics to social sciences is apples to oranges.  They require different sets of knowledge and skills.  Some people could easily do both but choose one over the other by personal preferences.  Others find one a cakewalk and the other impossible.  Some people less blessed than you struggle every day to get by, but persevere and get it done anyways.  Do you feel the need to prove that you are just as good as those MIT physics students?

Let me break it down for you: you have a good record as a student.  You do your work on time, and get good grades.  That allowed you to go to a good undergrad school and a good grad school.  In terms of admission to law school, the GPA portion basically says, how good of a student is this applicant?  Do they get work done and show up to class?  Grad school is impressive, but it is ultimately showing off the same type of ability that you already demonstrated in undergrad.

The LSAT is important because it says, how well equipped is this applicant to be a good law student?  Do you have the analytical and logical skills necessary to cut it reading case studies and making arguments based on it?  No undergrad or grad work is equivalent to the work you will do in law school.  Law schools, I have heard, almost dislike students who take too many pre-law undergrad classes because the law school then has to 'un-teach' what the student has been taught previously (an approach to studying law that does not jive with law school methods).  Your arrogance in discussing your previous schooling underscores this point- you sound like you think you are already ready to practice law.

If you really have a disability, you can petition the LSAC for special testing circumstances.  If you have to take the test, study hard and maximize your score.  If you get a bad score, write an addendum explaining why you did so, and why you think you'll be a good law student anyways.  Don't, when writing your essay, constantly name drop and say how great you are.  Be humble and say how hungry you are to prove that test wrong, explain what difficulties you encountered with your disability, and how you have overcome it.

But ultimately, if you still get a 150, be prepared to not go to the school of your choosing.

Maybe, since you are so awesome and think you are better than every other law student out there, just go get your PhD in social sciences and teach the theory of the law somewhere.  You sound like you are cut out to be that overbearing obnoxious professor that everyone hates to take.