Law School Discussion

did anyone lie about their race on the lsat?

Re: did anyone lie about their race on the lsat?
« Reply #30 on: October 08, 2008, 07:04:05 PM »
nohomo

Re: did anyone lie about their race on the lsat?
« Reply #31 on: October 09, 2008, 12:59:17 PM »
this is just ridiculous.  although I know plenty of white people check "other" to make it SEEM like they are some kind of minority without actually having to choose one of the minority statuses.

tcwhat

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Re: did anyone lie about their race on the lsat?
« Reply #32 on: October 09, 2008, 04:54:41 PM »
this is just ridiculous.  although I know plenty of white people check "other" to make it SEEM like they are some kind of minority without actually having to choose one of the minority statuses.

Is this speculation or did they tell you their sinister plan? If the latter, you need to find some new people to interact with.

Re: did anyone lie about their race on the lsat?
« Reply #33 on: October 09, 2008, 09:13:21 PM »
this is just ridiculous.  although I know plenty of white people check "other" to make it SEEM like they are some kind of minority without actually having to choose one of the minority statuses.

Is this speculation or did they tell you their sinister plan? If the latter, you need to find some new people to interact with.

haha it actually is the latter.   :P

tcwhat

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Re: did anyone lie about their race on the lsat?
« Reply #34 on: October 10, 2008, 05:55:01 AM »
this is just ridiculous.  although I know plenty of white people check "other" to make it SEEM like they are some kind of minority without actually having to choose one of the minority statuses.

Is this speculation or did they tell you their sinister plan? If the latter, you need to find some new people to interact with.

haha it actually is the latter.   :P

People like that are why my favorite professor is in favor of retroactive abortions.

Re: did anyone lie about their race on the lsat?
« Reply #35 on: October 10, 2008, 04:30:15 PM »
this is just ridiculous.  although I know plenty of white people check "other" to make it SEEM like they are some kind of minority without actually having to choose one of the minority statuses.

They probably just don't want to be discriminated against.  It's not so much that they want to be seen as a minority, they just don't want to be labeled as a "privileged" white person.

This is probably more of a problem for asians, however, who experience the most discrimination in admissions, and are therefore probably most likely to check the "other" box.

x2

Re: did anyone lie about their race on the lsat?
« Reply #36 on: October 10, 2008, 08:47:06 PM »
this is just ridiculous.  although I know plenty of white people check "other" to make it SEEM like they are some kind of minority without actually having to choose one of the minority statuses.

They probably just don't want to be discriminated against.  It's not so much that they want to be seen as a minority, they just don't want to be labeled as a "privileged" white person.

This is probably more of a problem for asians, however, who experience the most discrimination in admissions, and are therefore probably most likely to check the "other" box.

probably don't want to be discriminated against?  ha...

Re: did anyone lie about their race on the lsat?
« Reply #37 on: October 11, 2008, 01:48:30 AM »
Oh, never mind the question, we are dealing with the law and lawyers and government, people that like to over complicate and confuse everything and create gigantic mazes with lots of smoke and mirrors to make $$.   

The Law makes more work for lawyers.  Live it.  Love it.



Re: did anyone lie about their race on the lsat?
« Reply #38 on: October 11, 2008, 10:56:30 AM »
this is just ridiculous.  although I know plenty of white people check "other" to make it SEEM like they are some kind of minority without actually having to choose one of the minority statuses.

They probably just don't want to be discriminated against.  It's not so much that they want to be seen as a minority, they just don't want to be labeled as a "privileged" white person.

This is probably more of a problem for asians, however, who experience the most discrimination in admissions, and are therefore probably most likely to check the "other" box.

probably don't want to be discriminated against?  ha...

Why is this funny?  There's no question that whites and asians are discriminated against in admissions (though it's far worse for asians).  The only question is whether such discrimination is justified by other factors.  That's a debate for other threads.

There's also little question that most people don't like to be discriminated against, period.  And the people who are filling in the "other" box are clearly seeking to avoid this, or they wouldn't be checking the "other" box.  (I doubt they really think it will give them a positive boost, and the truth is, it probably gets them considered as white or even asian in reality.)

Yes, I agree people don't like being discriminated against.  I think what was funny to me is the comment that White's don't want to seem privileged and that somehow this whole "discriminating" thing is really a huge problem for whites.  Don't want to get all philosophical here, but Whites are always more privileged over nonwhites.  It is called "the Racial Contract" in which ALL whites are beneficiaries whether or not they choose to be.  And to try to mask that by checking off another box is pretty low.  But that definitely is a topic for another time and place.

tcwhat

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Re: did anyone lie about their race on the lsat?
« Reply #39 on: October 11, 2008, 03:23:24 PM »

I'm not really sure why you put "discriminating" in quotes.  Do you dispute that different groups are subject to different standards in admission?  If not, then one has to acknowledge that discrimination is taking place.  The only question, again, is whether that discrimination is justified.

Whether or not such discrimination is a "huge problem" for whites probably depends on the white person in question. White people, like every other group, come from all kinds of backgrounds.  A rich, well-supported white person probably won't be hurt much by preferential admissions.  They probably have enough advantages to overcome it.  However, a poor/working-class white person who's had to struggle for everything they have will probably be a more borderline applicant, and may therefore be impacted more (and bothered more) by such policies.

This post is completely off topic but your post reminds me of an essay in which David Foster Wallace discusses, in(unsurprisingly) a foot note, how the words "bias" and "discrimation" have devolved in meaning into the pejorative rather than their other original meanings.

It makes me miss DFW even more.

Carry on.