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Author Topic: Politics and school choices  (Read 1491 times)

gabe487

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Politics and school choices
« on: October 05, 2008, 09:38:02 PM »
I'm politically pretty moderate. Not an activist. Liberals annoy me. I understand conservatives, but I would not count myself among them (my family is straight up evangelical christian, me, not so much). Are all the top tier schools liberal havens?

What top 20 schools out there can offer an equally balanced group of students?

Brito

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Re: Politics and school choices
« Reply #1 on: October 05, 2008, 10:57:22 PM »
I'm politically pretty moderate. Not an activist. Liberals annoy me. I understand conservatives, but I would not count myself among them (my family is straight up evangelical christian, me, not so much). Are all the top tier schools liberal havens?

What top 20 schools out there can offer an equally balanced group of students?

Harvard is pretty balanced -- more liberals than conservatives, but vocal people on all sides.
Harvard 2010

pig floyd

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Re: Politics and school choices
« Reply #2 on: October 06, 2008, 02:52:15 AM »
I'm politically pretty moderate. Not an activist. Liberals annoy me. I understand conservatives, but I would not count myself among them (my family is straight up evangelical christian, me, not so much). Are all the top tier schools liberal havens?

What top 20 schools out there can offer an equally balanced group of students?

None.  Honestly.

(And, also, honestly, you're not "moderate" if liberals annoy you but you "understand" conservatives, especially when the specific conservatives you mention are those who tend to be on the freakish fringe).

(Also, honestly, I bet this poster is flame).

HTFH.
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j23

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Re: Politics and school choices
« Reply #3 on: October 06, 2008, 02:23:44 PM »
Pig floyd, what specific conservatives did he mention? He said his family was evangelical Christian, but said he didn't identify with them. Also, what would you define a moderate as? Is it impossible to be annoyed by liberals, while understanding conservatives, but still be a moderate?

augusta

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Re: Politics and school choices
« Reply #4 on: October 06, 2008, 02:41:32 PM »
Pig floyd, what specific conservatives did he mention? He said his family was evangelical Christian, but said he didn't identify with them. Also, what would you define a moderate as? Is it impossible to be annoyed by liberals, while understanding conservatives, but still be a moderate?

I find many self-professed liberals annoying. I often find the arguments given in support of their views to be weak and unfounded, and in fact they are frequently at least as judgmental and dictatorial as the worst of the far right-wingers(which is why I specified "self-professed"). But I also think democratic socialism is probably one of the best systems out there, and I support a whole host of policies that conservatives shun. I guess that could make me a moderate. But mostly I just think it makes me an intelligent, thoughtful citizen.

::self-selects::   
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lawboy81

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Re: Politics and school choices
« Reply #5 on: November 18, 2008, 11:55:22 PM »
I'd imagine most are overwhelmingly liberal, however, I think Virginia has a conservative reputation.  I'm sure there are lots of conservatives at Vanderbilt and Texas too.

moonpie

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Re: Politics and school choices
« Reply #6 on: November 20, 2008, 05:08:19 PM »
having strong analytical skills and being liberal have a strong, though certainly not absolute correlation.

katjust

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Re: Politics and school choices
« Reply #7 on: November 21, 2008, 09:12:00 AM »
having strong analytical skills and being liberal have a strong, though certainly not absolute correlation.

Misleading and irrelevant
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CTL

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Re: Politics and school choices
« Reply #8 on: November 21, 2008, 09:25:41 AM »
I'm with the OP and Augusta here.  I find most extreme Liberals are incredibly annoying, and many borderline on conspiracy theorists.  

I'm probably more fiscally conservative than most Republicans (I believe that there should be absolutely NO govt. money 'loaned' to the dying American auto industry for instance), but I am socially 'liberal' (a position which I don't believe is extreme whatsoever).  

To that extent I am moderate.  I typically vote Republican locally, since there is no pandering to religious groups in my district and IMO Republicans tend to be more productive at the local level.  On the other hand, I have voted Dem in the past two presidential elections.  That is more a function of Republicans having terrible options (Palin on the ticket?  Get real..) than my strong support of Democrats.

I think you'll find conservatives and liberals at all schools.  I think you'll find that the majority of people are like you and me though...moderate.
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Re: Politics and school choices
« Reply #9 on: November 21, 2008, 01:57:42 PM »
I'm pretty far right, and don't worry at all about the libs in law school. you're there to learn law, not get in pointless political debates