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Author Topic: "Notes and Questions" after cases  (Read 1151 times)

F. Mercury

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"Notes and Questions" after cases
« on: September 27, 2008, 09:58:44 PM »
How much attention should I pay to those "notes and questions."  They are often good questions, but some are just too hard to answer, and it takes a long time to actually work out the problems.

Thanks,
Eric

Bizarro Jerry

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Re: "Notes and Questions" after cases
« Reply #1 on: September 27, 2008, 10:16:52 PM »
I frequently find them to be more insightful and more important than the case itself.  I know they certainly get discussed in most classes, so I'd say they're fairly important.

F. Mercury

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Re: "Notes and Questions" after cases
« Reply #2 on: September 27, 2008, 10:22:59 PM »
yeah, i actually agree that they are really insightful.  they often involve variations of the case so that you can think about how the law should be applied in different situations.  but sometimes they just ask questions without giving you an answer, or at least how you should be thinking about the problems.  how should i approach those questions?

pig floyd

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Re: "Notes and Questions" after cases
« Reply #3 on: September 27, 2008, 10:38:18 PM »
I just read them quickly without actually thinking through the answers.  Mainly that's just so I have an idea what it's about if it comes up in class.
I hate science because I refuse to assume that a discipline based in large part on the continual scrapping and renewal of ideas is unconditionally correct in a given area.

jsb221

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Re: "Notes and Questions" after cases
« Reply #4 on: September 28, 2008, 02:31:05 PM »
In my experience, the notes are full of tidbids profs love to test on. As for the questions, I usually would briefly outline an answer so I had an opportunity to apply what I read to a hypo.