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Author Topic: Terrified of the LSAT  (Read 8505 times)

augusta

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Re: Terrified of the LSAT
« Reply #20 on: September 24, 2008, 04:50:53 PM »
The Top Law Schools site is a good resource too. Has a set of rankings, and links to each school on it so you can get an idea of what they're all about--location, tuition, quality of life, specialties, things like that. But it also has a ton of information on the application process, from taking the LSAT to writing personal statements.

I think it's top-law-schools.com, but you can also just google "top law schools", and it should be at or very near the top of the first page.
3.67/Oct. LSAT

angiej

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Re: Terrified of the LSAT
« Reply #21 on: September 24, 2008, 04:55:51 PM »
And what about my undergrad major, poli sci and women's studies.  Does women's studies seem bogus?

augusta

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Re: Terrified of the LSAT
« Reply #22 on: September 24, 2008, 05:23:12 PM »
There seem to be a couple answers to that question:

1) It doesn't matter what your major is.

2) It kinda matters what your major is, but mostly not in cases like yours.

Women's studies can look a little hazy as a major, but you said poli-sci is your major; so I wouldn't worry about it. Having a minor is pretty neutral, as far as I can tell. In fact, unless you're passionate about your minor, I would recommend against it--in other words, if you're getting a minor for the sake of looking "tougher" academically, I think your time will be better spent elsewhere. On the other hand, if you love it, go for it. I majored in Philosophy, and would've loved to have taken a poli-sci minor if I'd had time; but I decided I'd rather forge ahead than hang out in undergrad for a few extra courses.

3.67/Oct. LSAT

Lindbergh

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Re: Terrified of the LSAT
« Reply #23 on: September 25, 2008, 01:51:32 AM »
Thank you for saying that its good I am thinking ahead.  I get really tired of people telling me to focus on my undergrad and that I may change my mind, etc.  I hate to admit this, but the entire reason for going ahead with my bachelors is specifically so that I can get into law school.  Sure, there is a pretty large possibility that I may not get in, etc. and then atleast I will have a bachelors to compliment my paralegal certificate, but I am pretty goal oriented and hell bent on law school.

I guess I just want to know, is it possible to go to a state law school with an lsat score around 150?  That is pretty average, right?


150 is very average.  (The statistical median is right around 151/152.) 

That said, most law schools require higher scores, including most public schools.  You should generally shoot for at least a 155 to be reasonably competitive.

On the other hand, there are some schools where you can get in with an LSAT below 150.  They're obviously not the best, but they're still out there.

One thing to think about -- if you have a strong relationship with your current firm (and it seems that you do), then you may be able to get a job there even if you just attend a modest local law school.  It depends on the firm, but if it's not a real snooty place, and they know you and like you, and know you're a good worker, they might be able to take you on once you get your JD, regardless of where it's from.  Studying PT and continuing to work may be good for this, as it will maintain the relationship and make the segue from paralegal to attorney fairly seamless.

In other words, you're relatively well-positioned.  You have grades and contacts, which are a huge part of the picture.  Just work steadily on the LSAT -- it's very learnable -- starting out completely untimed, and just focusing on the concepts.  Start with a basic Kaplan book, and then carefully work through the powerscore books, or take a quality course.  Give yourself a good amount of lead time, ease into the process, and you'll feel much more comfortable with the test fairly soon.

angiej

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Re: Terrified of the LSAT
« Reply #24 on: September 25, 2008, 08:40:48 AM »
Women's studies can look a little hazy as a major, but you said poli-sci is your major; so I wouldn't worry about it. Having a minor is pretty neutral, as far as I can tell. In fact, unless you're passionate about your minor, I would recommend against it--in other words, if you're getting a minor for the sake of looking "tougher" academically, I think your time will be better spent elsewhere. On the other hand, if you love it, go for it. I majored in Philosophy, and would've loved to have taken a poli-sci minor if I'd had time; but I decided I'd rather forge ahead than hang out in undergrad for a few extra courses.



At my school, the college of liberal arts and studies makes in mandatory to select a minor.  Kinda stinks, b/c I'd rather not bother with it.  I suppose I could minor in philosophy, but yes, women's studies is something I am passionate about, though I fear it will not get me anywhere.

angiej

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Re: Terrified of the LSAT
« Reply #25 on: September 25, 2008, 08:47:40 AM »
Thank you for saying that its good I am thinking ahead.  I get really tired of people telling me to focus on my undergrad and that I may change my mind, etc.  I hate to admit this, but the entire reason for going ahead with my bachelors is specifically so that I can get into law school.  Sure, there is a pretty large possibility that I may not get in, etc. and then atleast I will have a bachelors to compliment my paralegal certificate, but I am pretty goal oriented and hell bent on law school.

I guess I just want to know, is it possible to go to a state law school with an lsat score around 150?  That is pretty average, right?


150 is very average.  (The statistical median is right around 151/152.) 

That said, most law schools require higher scores, including most public schools.  You should generally shoot for at least a 155 to be reasonably competitive.

On the other hand, there are some schools where you can get in with an LSAT below 150.  They're obviously not the best, but they're still out there.

One thing to think about -- if you have a strong relationship with your current firm (and it seems that you do), then you may be able to get a job there even if you just attend a modest local law school.  It depends on the firm, but if it's not a real snooty place, and they know you and like you, and know you're a good worker, they might be able to take you on once you get your JD, regardless of where it's from.  Studying PT and continuing to work may be good for this, as it will maintain the relationship and make the segue from paralegal to attorney fairly seamless.

In other words, you're relatively well-positioned.  You have grades and contacts, which are a huge part of the picture.  Just work steadily on the LSAT -- it's very learnable -- starting out completely untimed, and just focusing on the concepts.  Start with a basic Kaplan book, and then carefully work through the powerscore books, or take a quality course.  Give yourself a good amount of lead time, ease into the process, and you'll feel much more comfortable with the test fairly soon.


Awesome, thanks for the advice.  I hope you are all right about the LSAT being "learnable."  I do have several years to work on it which is helpful.

I do not think I could maintain my position at my firm while I am attending school b/c the nearest local school that would accept part time students is 2 hours away.  I am about 30 mins away from Notre Dame, but I do not believe they have part time programs.  (Plus I highly doubt I could get into ND, though it has been a life-long dream). My hope is to be accepted to either IU Bloomington or IU Indy.  Bloomington would be my first choice (ND is just a fantasy) but I read somewhere on the IU Bloomington website that this year their accepted students had higher gpa and lsat scores than the norm.  So the bar has been raised! 

TimMitchell

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Re: Terrified of the LSAT
« Reply #26 on: September 25, 2008, 09:17:19 AM »
Thank you for saying that its good I am thinking ahead.  I get really tired of people telling me to focus on my undergrad and that I may change my mind, etc.  I hate to admit this, but the entire reason for going ahead with my bachelors is specifically so that I can get into law school.  Sure, there is a pretty large possibility that I may not get in, etc. and then atleast I will have a bachelors to compliment my paralegal certificate, but I am pretty goal oriented and hell bent on law school.

I guess I just want to know, is it possible to go to a state law school with an lsat score around 150?  That is pretty average, right?


150 is very average.  (The statistical median is right around 151/152.) 

That said, most law schools require higher scores, including most public schools.  You should generally shoot for at least a 155 to be reasonably competitive.

On the other hand, there are some schools where you can get in with an LSAT below 150.  They're obviously not the best, but they're still out there.

One thing to think about -- if you have a strong relationship with your current firm (and it seems that you do), then you may be able to get a job there even if you just attend a modest local law school.  It depends on the firm, but if it's not a real snooty place, and they know you and like you, and know you're a good worker, they might be able to take you on once you get your JD, regardless of where it's from.  Studying PT and continuing to work may be good for this, as it will maintain the relationship and make the segue from paralegal to attorney fairly seamless.

In other words, you're relatively well-positioned.  You have grades and contacts, which are a huge part of the picture.  Just work steadily on the LSAT -- it's very learnable -- starting out completely untimed, and just focusing on the concepts.  Start with a basic Kaplan book, and then carefully work through the powerscore books, or take a quality course.  Give yourself a good amount of lead time, ease into the process, and you'll feel much more comfortable with the test fairly soon.


Awesome, thanks for the advice.  I hope you are all right about the LSAT being "learnable."  I do have several years to work on it which is helpful.

I do not think I could maintain my position at my firm while I am attending school b/c the nearest local school that would accept part time students is 2 hours away.  I am about 30 mins away from Notre Dame, but I do not believe they have part time programs.  (Plus I highly doubt I could get into ND, though it has been a life-long dream). My hope is to be accepted to either IU Bloomington or IU Indy.  Bloomington would be my first choice (ND is just a fantasy) but I read somewhere on the IU Bloomington website that this year their accepted students had higher gpa and lsat scores than the norm.  So the bar has been raised! 

Don't sell yourself short. Two years ago I was just really starting college and was hoping someday I'd be able to transfer to a better school, some big public, because mine sucked. Now ND is a very real possibility for me, maybe even with a scholarship. Don't be pessimistic, you have everything going for you right now.

angiej

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Re: Terrified of the LSAT
« Reply #27 on: September 25, 2008, 09:28:17 AM »


Don't sell yourself short. Two years ago I was just really starting college and was hoping someday I'd be able to transfer to a better school, some big public, because mine sucked. Now ND is a very real possibility for me, maybe even with a scholarship. Don't be pessimistic, you have everything going for you right now.
[/quote]

Thanks, that makes me feel better.  You'll have to look me up if you come to ND, S.B. is a pretty bland town, with very little "fun" things to do.

TimMitchell

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Re: Terrified of the LSAT
« Reply #28 on: September 25, 2008, 10:08:36 AM »


Don't sell yourself short. Two years ago I was just really starting college and was hoping someday I'd be able to transfer to a better school, some big public, because mine sucked. Now ND is a very real possibility for me, maybe even with a scholarship. Don't be pessimistic, you have everything going for you right now.

Thanks, that makes me feel better.  You'll have to look me up if you come to ND, S.B. is a pretty bland town, with very little "fun" things to do.
[/quote]

 :-[ How is the campus life?

angiej

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Re: Terrified of the LSAT
« Reply #29 on: September 25, 2008, 10:28:04 AM »

[/quote]

 :-[ How is the campus life?
[/quote]

From what I understand the campus life makes up for the lack of what South Bend has to offer.  Students have more on campus socials and parties and create their own fun.  South Bend has a minor league softball team and is (thank god) not too far from Chicago.  Also about an hour and a half from Ft. Wayne and 3 hours from Indy, so if you are a big city person, there are options, if your willing to travel.  There are a couple of movie theatres, one shopping mall that is fairly good sized with nationaly known stores, and there are alot of jobs here for college students (lots of retail opportunities, restaraunts, bookstores, etc.)  We are in a real economy slump right now as our main economic anchor has been the manufacturing industry (mostly recreational which is really poor right now).  In the city in which I live which is 20 miles east of South Bend, most of our workers are laid off and our companies have shut down which is very, very scary.  South Bend is home to the AM General Plant (where they make hummers) so that's sort of a big deal, other than that, not much to boast about. You may be interested in reading this:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Bend,_IN

The ND campus is beautiful. I grew up within a short bike ride distance and used to visit frequently (which is how/why I developed the life long dream of attending there).  There are two large lakes that are absolutely breathtaking and the architecture of the buildings is amazing.  They are currently remodeling the law library after receiving a very large multi million dollar anonymous donation to the law program.