Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: Judicial Clerkships  (Read 1749 times)

Remarq

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 254
    • View Profile
Judicial Clerkships
« on: September 23, 2008, 12:18:01 AM »
Are judicial clerkships a ticket into big law firms or are they more beneficial for people trying to do government or public sector law? I had always assumed it was for people who wanted to be D.A.ís or judges is that the case?

pig floyd

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 852
    • View Profile
Re: Judicial Clerkships
« Reply #1 on: September 23, 2008, 12:19:28 AM »
clerkships are for everyone.
I hate science because I refuse to assume that a discipline based in large part on the continual scrapping and renewal of ideas is unconditionally correct in a given area.

nealric

  • Global Moderator
  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 2261
  • a.k.a. Miguel Sanchez
    • View Profile
Re: Judicial Clerkships
« Reply #2 on: September 23, 2008, 12:58:52 AM »
Only federal or state supreme court clerkships are really beneficial to biglaw. Their usefulness probably depends on your intended practice area. Practice areas like appellate litigation pretty much demand that you have done a clerkship.

Generally speaking, such clerkships are harder to get than just getting biglaw upfront but they probably offer a better experience for a new lawyer.
Georgetown Law Graduate

Chief justice Earl Warren wasn't a stripper!
Now who's being naive?

Tetris

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 2146
  • Michigan Rocks
    • View Profile
    • LSN
Re: Judicial Clerkships
« Reply #3 on: September 24, 2008, 12:45:24 PM »
Would a clerkship from a small state SC, like Wyoming or Montana, carry a lot of weight? Is it the "state connection" aspect of clerking at a state SC that is so valuable, or just the experience itself no matter where it is?
_______
.|E|R|S.

smiley

  • Guest
Re: Judicial Clerkships
« Reply #4 on: September 25, 2008, 04:00:19 PM »
Would a clerkship from a small state SC, like Wyoming or Montana, carry a lot of weight? Is it the "state connection" aspect of clerking at a state SC that is so valuable, or just the experience itself no matter where it is?

Carry a lot of weight in what sense? There are a lot of compelling reasons to clerk for a state supreme court and "small" states or not the most popular states (i.e. NY, MA, etc.) have very interesting dockets that might appeal to people with particular interests. You have to think about a couple of things when you look to clerk at state supreme courts. States can be really parochial sometimes (which is what I was told by our clerkship advisors - I see you go to Michigan as well, go talk to them when you are a 2L, I have found them to be the most helpful and supportive people on campus) so you might have to have a good reason or a good connection to get noticed, even from a school like Michigan.

I think the "state connection" aspect can be really important for breaking into a state, or even a region of the country, where otherwise your connections or work experience are not as strong. This is what I'm doing as I will be clerking for a state supreme court in a very distinct region of the country where I've never lived or worked before but I really intend to practice there, etc. I know some other people who have worked their former connections to an area and will clerk for that state's supreme court in hopes of establishing themselves in the region once again to lead into better firm job prospects.

I also just really want to clerk. I think it will be a great experience and I'm looking forward particularly to the cases and litigants that will appear before the court in the state I'm clerking in. And, I really like legal research and writing, and bluebooking (no lie).

3Loser

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 38
    • View Profile
Re: Judicial Clerkships
« Reply #5 on: October 09, 2008, 03:18:46 PM »
All clerkships are valuable.

A state clerkship, including some state SC clerkships, is a ticket to state connections, which is valuable if you plan on practicing state law. Generally, speaking, BIGLAW does not care about state clerkships.

A federal clerkship is a ticket to almost anything you want. BIGLAW, yes. State practice, yes. Another clerkship, yes.


Ninja1

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 3089
  • ☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Judicial Clerkships
« Reply #6 on: October 10, 2008, 11:36:13 PM »
All clerkships are valuable.

A state clerkship, including some state SC clerkships, is a ticket to state connections, which is valuable if you plan on practicing state law. Generally, speaking, BIGLAW does not care about state clerkships.

A federal clerkship is a ticket to almost anything you want. BIGLAW, yes. State practice, yes. Another clerkship, yes.



This gets me thinking, how many clerkships can you do in a row? I've heard of back to back, but never more than that.
I'mma stay bumpin' till I bump my head on my tomb.

Private David Lewis

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 462
    • View Profile
Re: Judicial Clerkships
« Reply #7 on: October 10, 2008, 11:45:29 PM »
All clerkships are valuable.

A state clerkship, including some state SC clerkships, is a ticket to state connections, which is valuable if you plan on practicing state law. Generally, speaking, BIGLAW does not care about state clerkships.

A federal clerkship is a ticket to almost anything you want. BIGLAW, yes. State practice, yes. Another clerkship, yes.



This gets me thinking, how many clerkships can you do in a row? I've heard of back to back, but never more than that.

I've heard of people doing District Ct, COA, Sup Ct.  There are also some clerkships that are for two years. 
The main partner in their Entertainment Law group went to CLS, but he was Fiske and on LR, so be careful.  You don't want to set yourself goals that are too high.