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Author Topic: SMU Reduced Load Program  (Read 3718 times)

hopeful1985

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Re: SMU Reduced Load Program
« Reply #10 on: October 02, 2008, 02:39:32 PM »
hopeful, you're just telling the truth.  With tuition of $15K per year, it might be worth it to go to SMU, but anything beyond $20 per year, SMU is not worth it considering the number of its graduates being unemployed, under-employed, etc. 

In-state tuition at UH and Texas Tech are worth considering. 

Pretty much why I posted what I originally posted but didnt give any further explanation (my fault). The normal tuition is just too high.

Holden Caulfield

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Re: SMU Reduced Load Program
« Reply #11 on: October 02, 2008, 02:47:13 PM »
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Contract2008

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Re: SMU Reduced Load Program
« Reply #12 on: October 02, 2008, 03:39:34 PM »

hopeful, you're just telling the truth.  With tuition of $15K per year, it might be worth it to go to SMU, but anything beyond $20 per year, SMU is not worth it considering the number of its graduates being unemployed, under-employed, etc. 

In-state tuition at UH and Texas Tech are worth considering. 

Pretty much why I posted what I originally posted but didnt give any further explanation (my fault). The normal tuition is just too high.

You actually believe that it has 100% reporting rate?  Look at stats at all top 14 law schools and you'll see that none of them have 100% reporting rate.  The reporting rate goes down substantially after the top 20 law schools or so and you actually buy the fact that SMU, a barely tier 1 law school has 100% reporting rate? 

Do you know any 2008 SMU law grduates?  Did you ever asked them about the employment statues of their classmates/friends?  What about class of 2007 and class of 2006?  Encounter any of them who are still working as clerk at some small firm or waiting tables?

Actually 80% of students were employed at graduation and 97% were employed 9 months later (2006 data). According the the Dean of the law school, this is with 100% reporting (seriously). The numbers speak for themselves.

Also consider the major difference in starting salary between SMU, Tech, and Houston.

gooseisland

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Re: SMU Reduced Load Program
« Reply #13 on: October 02, 2008, 07:49:59 PM »
im from texas and SMU's tuition is insanely high. even with a 25,000 scholarship it's beyond affordable for me.

$11,000 a year is a steal for an education at a tier 1 school if you ask me

Sorry didnt see the 25k a year part.. in that case I would def. agree! haha.. but I think that doesnt happen too often.

Well thank you for the extra information that you added to my thread. It was really helpful, I don't think I will even consider SMU now. Out of the few response that I did get your added advice hit the nail on the head, don't go to SMU. Oh and by the way if you didn't see the 25k part then why did you say "even with a 25,000 scholarship?" Again, thanks for your input.

cajunchris

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Re: SMU Reduced Load Program
« Reply #14 on: October 03, 2008, 02:20:12 AM »
I am also looking at SMU Law Evening Program. I have a 3.48, played an NCAA sport, and I am about to take the October LSAT. What do you guys think is the lowest I can get to assure acceptance? 157, 158, 159? Thanks for the input.

hopeful1985

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Re: SMU Reduced Load Program
« Reply #15 on: October 03, 2008, 09:17:21 AM »
im from texas and SMU's tuition is insanely high. even with a 25,000 scholarship it's beyond affordable for me.

$11,000 a year is a steal for an education at a tier 1 school if you ask me

Sorry didnt see the 25k a year part.. in that case I would def. agree! haha.. but I think that doesnt happen too often.

Well thank you for the extra information that you added to my thread. It was really helpful, I don't think I will even consider SMU now. Out of the few response that I did get your added advice hit the nail on the head, don't go to SMU. Oh and by the way if you didn't see the 25k part then why did you say "even with a 25,000 scholarship?" Again, thanks for your input.

hey no problem! thank you for noticing!  :)

Holden Caulfield

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Re: SMU Reduced Load Program
« Reply #16 on: October 03, 2008, 12:16:21 PM »
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Holden Caulfield

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Re: SMU Reduced Load Program
« Reply #17 on: October 03, 2008, 12:24:36 PM »
hopeful, you're just telling the truth.  With tuition of $15K per year, it might be worth it to go to SMU, but anything beyond $20 per year, SMU is not worth it considering the number of its graduates being unemployed, under-employed, etc. 

In-state tuition at UH and Texas Tech are worth considering. 

I haven't seen any real data suggesting SMU grads have a hard time finding jobs. I'll I've seen are people on this forum saying such things with nothing to back it up. Don't give the school a bad rap unless you have valid info supporting what you say.

I personally wouldn't pay full price at SMU if I had a scholarship to Texas Tech or Houston. I think Tech is a good school. However, if there was only at 10K or 15K difference I would seriously think about SMU. Just the differences in average starting salary would make up for the difference in tuition in no time.

Contract2008

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Re: SMU Reduced Load Program
« Reply #18 on: October 04, 2008, 10:33:58 AM »

As far as reporting rate, I'm just telling you what they told me. As far as 2008 graduates, I personally know none (How many do you know?). I do, however, know many 2L's and 3Ls; none know of any 2008 graduates still looking for jobs, much less waiting tables.


Com'on now.  Use common sense. There is no school that would have 100% reporting rate (though not sure about small top schools like Yale and Stanford, even them, I am somewhat skeptical, because the last stats I've seen, in those schools, the reporting rate is still in the 90s or 80s). 

2Ls and 3Ls are in school and they are being asked all the time.  But, once someone graduated, they don't go around advertising their unemployment or underemployment stats.  I know many 2008 grads (including those on some law review or journals) who are unemployed and some 2007-2005 who are employed, but not as lawyers. 

Holden Caulfield

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Re: SMU Reduced Load Program
« Reply #19 on: October 06, 2008, 10:47:09 PM »

As far as reporting rate, I'm just telling you what they told me. As far as 2008 graduates, I personally know none (How many do you know?). I do, however, know many 2L's and 3Ls; none know of any 2008 graduates still looking for jobs, much less waiting tables.


Com'on now.  Use common sense. There is no school that would have 100% reporting rate (though not sure about small top schools like Yale and Stanford, even them, I am somewhat skeptical, because the last stats I've seen, in those schools, the reporting rate is still in the 90s or 80s). 

2Ls and 3Ls are in school and they are being asked all the time.  But, once someone graduated, they don't go around advertising their unemployment or underemployment stats.  I know many 2008 grads (including those on some law review or journals) who are unemployed and some 2007-2005 who are employed, but not as lawyers. 

LSAC says they reported 100%; check it out:

http://officialguide.lsac.org/SearchResults/SchoolPage.aspx?sid=139

93.2% Employed
1.5% Pursuing Graduate Degrees
5.0% Unemployed (Seeking, not seeking, or studying for the bar)

Surely LSAC wouldn't let them put up bad numbers...