Law School Discussion

Michigan's New "No LSAT" Admissions

Michigan's New "No LSAT" Admissions
« on: September 17, 2008, 12:35:12 AM »
http://www.law.umich.edu/prospectivestudents/admissions/applyingtomichigan/Pages/WolverineScholars.aspx

LSAT requiredment waived for UMICH undergrads!

Expect Michigan's ranking to go up in the coming years. This policy allows Michigan to fill their in-state residency requirement with high GPA people. While boosting median GPA, it doesn't affect their median LSAT (actually, that means median LSAT will go up, since residents pull down their median LSAT). I expect that it will also increase application volume and yield rate. Very smart move.

bloomlaw

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Re: Michigan's New "No LSAT" Admissions
« Reply #1 on: September 17, 2008, 01:35:41 AM »
Interesting. But they are trying it this year? Was that timeline right? They decide in the 09 summer for students starting fall '10. But I guess its a neat idea.

In the long run, it will help high LSAT splitters to get in there, I guess, right? Too bad it won't be started this year.

bloomlaw

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Re: Michigan's New "No LSAT" Admissions
« Reply #2 on: September 17, 2008, 01:41:31 AM »
Interesting. But they are trying it this year? Was that timeline right? They decide in the 09 summer for students starting fall '10. But I guess its a neat idea.

In the long run, it will help high LSAT splitters to get in there, I guess, right? Too bad it won't be started this year.

If you have a high LSAT, it obviously won't help you.  It would rather hurt you.

(I don't believe they average anymore, do they?)

I thought it might weaken their student body as well. But I don't see how it would hurt high lsats. They can buoy our bad gpa's with their high, unconnected to LSAT gpa. Therefore, gpa would be minimized a bit when looking at other applicants, making LSAT more important. Right? Or am I missing something?

bloomlaw

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Re: Michigan's New "No LSAT" Admissions
« Reply #3 on: September 17, 2008, 02:00:07 AM »
Interesting. But they are trying it this year? Was that timeline right? They decide in the 09 summer for students starting fall '10. But I guess its a neat idea.

In the long run, it will help high LSAT splitters to get in there, I guess, right? Too bad it won't be started this year.

If you have a high LSAT, it obviously won't help you.  It would rather hurt you.

(I don't believe they average anymore, do they?)

I thought it might weaken their student body as well. But I don't see how it would hurt high lsats. They can buoy our bad gpa's with their high, unconnected to LSAT gpa. Therefore, gpa would be minimized a bit when looking at other applicants, making LSAT more important. Right? Or am I missing something?

Okay, I was thinking in terms of those applying under the program.  In that case, if you had a high LSAT, and didn't disclose it, then that would clearly hurt you.

However, for other applicants, you may be right.

I still don't see how USNews would let them get away with this without penalizing them in some way, though.

So what do they expect the UG kids to do? Take the LSAT in June? They won't know if they would be accepted or not until late July, so thats out, meaning they could hamper their chances in the cycle by waiting on michigan acceptance. But say they take it but also get accepted by UM, and then get their score back and its like a 155? Or what if they get accepted and decide to take the LSAT in october, than bomb it, like something in the 130s. Thats possible, right? And US NEWS would know the score.

Re: Michigan's New "No LSAT" Admissions
« Reply #4 on: September 17, 2008, 05:25:07 AM »
I'm assuming students will take the October LSAT if they do not get in / are not satisfied with Michigan's offer. in response to Lindburgh, I do not think it will lower the standard. Considering UM's median UG gpa of 3.2, it's likely that a MINIMUM GPA of 3.8 just to APPLY will yield very smart students.

While being tied with NW is actually quite unfortunate, it's not like michigan's ACTUAL reputation has fallen (ie..  employment, supreme court clerkships, alumni, reputation survey). it can go up to #6 on US news in a blink if it wants to. Michigan never focused so much on numbers (relative to what it can do), and probably never will.

bloomlaw

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Re: Michigan's New "No LSAT" Admissions
« Reply #5 on: September 17, 2008, 05:53:21 PM »
I'm assuming students will take the October LSAT if they do not get in / are not satisfied with Michigan's offer.

But what if they want to test the waters of other law schools after being accepted to Michigan, take the lsat, and suck, or do average, or just above average. They could still just go to michigan and their lsat wouldn't hurt them, but would hurt michigan.

Re: Michigan's New "No LSAT" Admissions
« Reply #6 on: September 17, 2008, 07:35:08 PM »
I think that's why one of the rules of the program is that you cannot take the LSAT.

Ninja1

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Re: Michigan's New "No LSAT" Admissions
« Reply #7 on: September 21, 2008, 01:10:17 AM »
Just another example of Michigan continuing its march towards irrelevance (as a school and a state)...

Ninja1

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Re: Michigan's New "No LSAT" Admissions
« Reply #8 on: September 21, 2008, 02:06:52 AM »
Just another example of Michigan continuing its march towards irrelevance (as a school and a state)...

In Michigan's defense, it will always be a better school than FSU.  ;)  And I believe the state itself is one of the 10 most populous states in the nation, as well as the largest west of the Mississippi, with one of the longest shorelines. 

That said, I certainly prefer the Florida beaches, especially where they show their boobies.

Michigan is the largest state west of the Mississippi?

I'm just saying if you look at it though, Michigan (more the state here) doesn't have a whole lot going for it right now. It's core industry has been collapsing for the last 8 years and shows little promise down the line, its economy generally sucks from what I gather, and Detroit is still a *&^% hole.

As for the school, well, you saw the ND game. ;)