Law School Discussion

*Real* Employment prospects for your law school

Re: *Real* Employment prospects for your law school
« Reply #40 on: September 14, 2008, 12:02:55 PM »


a 50k salary has the trajectory of topping out at or below 100K
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When you say "topping out", does that presume a 3-5 year window or does it account for a longer period of time under the assumption that the attorney does not become a partner? $100k or below seems low for a partner at a firm of say 3-10 attorneys. Typically, gaining a partnership would take longer than 3-5 years, though.

$100k seems low for the government, as well. Experienced attorneys for both the SEC and DoJ top out at over $120k (I believe $150 for the SEC), even though the entry level positions start at $40k (I think $60k for the SEC). This probably entails supervisory work, though.

In any event, I agree with the gist of your posts: that the legal market is not fraught with six figure positions fresh out of law school. Only the select few can get such positions. It may be even worse than what you state because there are so many sons and daughters of Big Law partners who are virtually guaranteed a job upon a graduation, regardless of school, class rank, or GPA. The prevailing statistics don't account for those folks. Let's not forget the sons and daughters of the major clients of Big Law firms who are attending law school either. I doubt that the wait in the same line as the rest of us for jobs. This is the nature of life, however. It's inherently unfair.

Many will call me naive, but I truly believe that your skills and talents will make room for you. If you develop skills and talents superior to your peers (or at least on par with the best of your peers), you will be successful, despite lack of prestige or social connections. Of course, this takes hard work and determination... traits that too many members of the Nintendo Generation seem to lack.

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Re: *Real* Employment prospects for your law school
« Reply #41 on: September 14, 2008, 12:17:53 PM »


a 50k salary has the trajectory of topping out at or below 100K

When you say "topping out", does that presume a 3-5 year window or does it account for a longer period of time under the assumption that the attorney does not become a partner? $100k or below seems low for a partner at a firm of say 3-10 attorneys. Typically, gaining a partnership would take longer than 3-5 years, though.

$100k seems low for the government, as well. Experienced attorneys for both the SEC and DoJ top out at over $120k (I believe $150 for the SEC), even though the entry level positions start at $40k (I think $60k for the SEC). This probably entails supervisory work, though.

In any event, I agree with the gist of your posts: that the legal market is not fraught with six figure positions fresh out of law school. Only the select few can get such positions. It may be even worse than what you state because there are so many sons and daughters of Big Law partners who are virtually guaranteed a job upon a graduation, regardless of school, class rank, or GPA. The prevailing statistics don't account for those folks. Let's not forget the sons and daughters of the major clients of Big Law firms who are attending law school either. I doubt that the wait in the same line as the rest of us for jobs. This is the nature of life, however. It's inherently unfair.

Many will call me naive, but I truly believe that your skills and talents will make room for you. If you develop skills and talents superior to your peers (or at least on par with the best of your peers), you will be successful, despite lack of prestige or social connections. Of course, this takes hard work and determination... traits that too many members of the Nintendo Generation seem to lack.
[/quote]


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I agree. So the answer is: kiss ass. Network  like crazy. Meet partners. Like me, I could get a job at my sister's firm but I don't want to. (I don't like working with family..lol). But another reason is that I want to bail out of law altogether. I just don't like what is going on between the caste system, the outsourcing, and the work/ life balancing issues. But the fact remains, just like the entertainment industry connections are king.

Re: *Real* Employment prospects for your law school
« Reply #42 on: September 14, 2008, 01:26:28 PM »
So, if not law, then what?

Re: *Real* Employment prospects for your law school
« Reply #43 on: September 16, 2008, 03:10:26 PM »
Anyone else think it's awesome that Franklin Pierce and Dayton have better placement in NLJ250 firms than Loyola LA, Syracuse, and Hofstra?
Yes, and John Marshall (Chicago) also places about 5% into the NLJ250.

But.

What you have to remember is that these people are often the ones who already have an "in" with the firms.  A biglaw firm I talked with some time ago suggested going to work for them and going to JM(C) part-time.  Unfortunately I was unable to take the patent bar at that time, and that was a hard-and-fast requirement (they didn't want a tech spec, I had to be able to sign documents).

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Re: *Real* Employment prospects for your law school
« Reply #44 on: September 16, 2008, 03:25:11 PM »
So, if not law, then what?

I'm weighing my options...lol. I graduated with a tech degree. so I might go back into that industry.

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Re: *Real* Employment prospects for your law school
« Reply #45 on: September 16, 2008, 10:45:43 PM »
So, if not law, then what?

I'm weighing my options...lol. I graduated with a tech degree. so I might go back into that industry.

No interesting IP work in that field?

well patent work requires more than an IT degree. Something like a hard science or engineering degree. But I am keeping an open mind. I will finalize after I take the bar in Feb.

Re: *Real* Employment prospects for your law school
« Reply #46 on: September 16, 2008, 10:47:37 PM »

well patent work requires more than an IT degree. Something like a hard science or engineering degree. But I am keeping an open mind. I will finalize after I take the bar in Feb.

Sort of.

Re: *Real* Employment prospects for your law school
« Reply #47 on: September 16, 2008, 11:23:09 PM »
Anyone else think it's awesome that Franklin Pierce and Dayton have better placement in NLJ250 firms than Loyola LA, Syracuse, and Hofstra?
Yes, and John Marshall (Chicago) also places about 5% into the NLJ250.

But.

What you have to remember is that these people are often the ones who already have an "in" with the firms.  A biglaw firm I talked with some time ago suggested going to work for them and going to JM(C) part-time.  Unfortunately I was unable to take the patent bar at that time, and that was a hard-and-fast requirement (they didn't want a tech spec, I had to be able to sign documents).

For the record, I wasn't trying to make the point that Dayton or FP are better schools than Loyola, Hofstra, or Syracuse. The latter schools are just higher ranked (and closer to major legal markets) than the former, which makes the placement numbers sort of funny.

Re: *Real* Employment prospects for your law school
« Reply #48 on: September 17, 2008, 12:11:27 AM »
So, if not law, then what?

I'm weighing my options...lol. I graduated with a tech degree. so I might go back into that industry.

What made you want to go to law school in the first place? Call me crazy, but why shift gears before you even gain some traction in your career field?

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Re: *Real* Employment prospects for your law school
« Reply #49 on: September 17, 2008, 01:22:55 PM »
So, if not law, then what?

I'm weighing my options...lol. I graduated with a tech degree. so I might go back into that industry.

What made you want to go to law school in the first place? Call me crazy, but why shift gears before you even gain some traction in your career field?

She seems a little flighty.


Not everyone goes to law school to practice. The majority do. But some go into academia, others go into the corporate world and others who are enterprising may even start their own businesses. I plan to do that. Nothing flighty or crazy about that.