Law School Discussion

*Real* Employment prospects for your law school

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*Real* Employment prospects for your law school
« on: August 27, 2008, 10:36:00 AM »
Here is a chart by the national law journal that shows where the graduates from each law school found work.

It shows the percentage of graduates that were employed, found big law jobs, etc..

Screw the US news. This is what you should be using!


http://pdfserver.amlaw.com/nlj/20080414employment_trends.pdf

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Re: Employment prospects for law schools
« Reply #1 on: August 27, 2008, 10:41:04 AM »
Here is another article on how to select a law school and boost job prospects:

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB119370191229675648.html?mod=Leader-US


This should help you decide among law schools.

Re: *Real* Employment prospects for your law school
« Reply #2 on: August 27, 2008, 02:43:03 PM »
Hi. Let's assume that I could speak and write Chinese and that I was interested in going to law school and then working for a company that does biz with China. Any ideas on how i might find out how difficult it would be to land such a job or what people who have this type of work think of it? Aside from calling up Walmart HQ and saying "yeah, let me speak to sb in your china legal division... :-\"

Also, thanks much for the above links. Berry useful...

Re: *Real* Employment prospects for your law school
« Reply #3 on: August 27, 2008, 02:59:46 PM »
Anyone else think it's awesome that Franklin Pierce and Dayton have better placement in NLJ250 firms than Loyola LA, Syracuse, and Hofstra?

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Re: *Real* Employment prospects for your law school
« Reply #4 on: August 27, 2008, 03:12:55 PM »
Anyone else think it's awesome that Franklin Pierce and Dayton have better placement in NLJ250 firms than Loyola LA, Syracuse, and Hofstra?

Yes, i agree, this whole list is shocking. It turns a lot of the US news rankings on its head. I didnt even know that this list existed until today.

I think that these types of rankings could displace the US news style of ranking. Because it focuses on what is most important: the cost benefit analysis--job prospects. And it breaks it down into the type of employment. Because other employment surveys dont distinguish between graduates who are working in firms and graduates who are flipping burgers at wendys. Unfortunately, US News did not get the memo...

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Re: *Real* Employment prospects for your law school
« Reply #5 on: August 27, 2008, 03:20:39 PM »
Hi. Let's assume that I could speak and write Chinese and that I was interested in going to law school and then working for a company that does biz with China. Any ideas on how i might find out how difficult it would be to land such a job or what people who have this type of work think of it? Aside from calling up Walmart HQ and saying "yeah, let me speak to sb in your china legal division... :-\"

Also, thanks much for the above links. Berry useful...


I actually bought a book that discusses this. It tells you exactly what you need to do in order to break into certain specialties. It is called "the official guide to legal specialties." They have a whole section on international law. You have to get into big law or intern at a transnational corp during the summer. And take plenty of business law classes.

Re: *Real* Employment prospects for your law school
« Reply #6 on: August 27, 2008, 06:57:48 PM »
The NLJ chart is interesting, but I wouldn't look at it or draw conclusions without reading the following article, which came along with that chart:

http://www.law.com/jsp/nlj/PubArticleNLJ.jsp?id=1207904889498

Basically, the authors of the article offer some advice about law school selection and debt that is unconventional, especially on boards like this one.

B

Re: *Real* Employment prospects for your law school
« Reply #7 on: August 27, 2008, 08:24:42 PM »
I haven't browsed these forums in awhile, but I recall a discussion about these charts.

While they are extremely valuable, they aren't perfect.  I think the general consensus was that schools that do well in the south got shafted a bit, because although there are firms that pay big money, a relatively high percent of them are not reflected in the NLJ250.

I'll probably forget about this thread and fail to reply to it.

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Re: *Real* Employment prospects for your law school
« Reply #8 on: August 29, 2008, 12:20:40 AM »
I haven't browsed these forums in awhile, but I recall a discussion about these charts.

While they are extremely valuable, they aren't perfect.  I think the general consensus was that schools that do well in the south got shafted a bit, because although there are firms that pay big money, a relatively high percent of them are not reflected in the NLJ250.

I'll probably forget about this thread and fail to reply to it.

It is not perfect, but it is extremely helpful. Waay better than what is provided by US news.

Re: *Real* Employment prospects for your law school
« Reply #9 on: August 29, 2008, 12:34:39 AM »
Hey all, I'm a law student at a public law school in CA, and thought I might share some info. with you guys about what else is out there besides looking at where large law firms hire from.
Some things to think about..
1. Not everyone wants to work in a huge firm where they have to put 60-80 hours in a week (and those that do work for these firms usually quit within a year, the attrition rate is through the roof)
2. Many schools will pay your tuition back in FULL if you make under a certain amount a year for a while (usually working for a public interest firm for about 5 years, you know actually helping people who NEED it).
3. A bill waiting to be signed by the Pres. (which he has said he will sign) was recently passed that forgives up to 90K in student law loans to those who go into public practice for 3 years
4. Most (and by most I mean over 75%) lawyers work in small to midsize firms who feed out of the Tier 1 and Tier 2 schools, and your pay within that category will reflect what tier school you come out of.

It seems like were either looking at how many people are employed at huge firms from the graphs, or were talking about going to a 3rd or 4th tier school as a means to be a "big fish" in the hope of getting into a top firm. If you donít get into a T-14 school and you choose a bottom tier school by this logic, you are limiting your options.  First off,  something like 80% of all Lawyers work for small to medium size firms, and while the pay rate (and hours) aren't as great as those huge firms (although you can easily make 90k at a med. Sized law firm), it does make a difference if you went to a tier 1 (top 50),2, 3, or 4 school, and your pay in that sector will reflect this difference.  Plus, if you think it doesnít matter where you went to school because you can always work in public practice (you know, if it just so happens you donít graduate top of your class at that tier 4 school you chose, and now no medium or even small sized firm will hire you) think again.  Public practice, while not as selective on class ranking, in many cases, is much more selective in their choices of school than most small to medium sized firms.  I guess I'm just saying that you should go to the best school possible, and when you get accepted to a certain tier, do the research within that tier, you will have many more options.