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Author Topic: Majors  (Read 700 times)

dsig2201

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Majors
« on: August 27, 2008, 10:13:52 AM »
On the application, do law schools take into consideration what major you were?  A major in something such as Finance or Economics vs something else maybe seen as easier? 

heartbreaker

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Re: Majors
« Reply #1 on: August 27, 2008, 10:20:50 AM »
No, they don't care.

libera me

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Re: Majors
« Reply #2 on: August 27, 2008, 10:24:45 AM »
it matters minimally, maybe as a tiebreaker (key word maybe), if you and someone from the same school applied with identical numbers and you majored in bible and he/she majored in physics, guess what? physics wins

heartbreaker

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Re: Majors
« Reply #3 on: August 27, 2008, 10:28:22 AM »
Quote
it matters minimally, maybe as a tiebreaker (key word maybe), if you and someone from the same school applied with identical numbers and you majored in bible and he/she majored in physics, guess what? physics wins

This is my least favorite pre-law thought experiment. Things like this never happen. Ever. It is a total waste of time to even think about it. There's no such thing as one factor that is a tiebreaker. Maybe that person who majored in "bible" has served as a minister or a rabbi and brings interesting life experience to the table. Maybe that physics major isn't able to write an articulate personal statement. A major will never be a tiebreak.

Study what interests you. Law schools don't care.

Spor

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Re: Majors
« Reply #4 on: August 28, 2008, 06:08:45 PM »
I've heard varying opinions on this.  Some people say if you have something like an engineering or science degree they can be more forgiving of a slightly lower GPA.  I also don't think it can hurt the "diversity" factor of your application.  If 90% of the applicants all have the same major it can't hurt to be different, offer a different point of view.

But who really knows...
I want this and I won't be denied.

xferlawstudent

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Re: Majors
« Reply #5 on: August 28, 2008, 06:26:08 PM »
I generally agree that law schools don't much care about your UG major.  However, they will likely evaluate your GPA based on this.  For instance, a 4.0 in criminal justice is not as impressive as a 4.0 in physics.

Another point to think about is getting exposed to areas in UG that may help you with practice.  For example, if you want to work in BIGLAW it may be helpful to get a degree in business/accounting/finance because a lot of big firm work is large business transactions.  A background in financial statements and similar would give you a slight edge in your career (but probably not in OCI/hiring).

Similarly, if you want practice criminal law maybe look towards sociology or similar.

TeeTwenty

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Re: Majors
« Reply #6 on: August 29, 2008, 09:47:52 AM »
Most law schools want to have a couple kids every year that will go on the lucrative IP track. Those kids need to be engineers/physicists/Biochem/other technical. With the exception that a lower GPA in those subjects MAY be accepted, the schools don't really seem to care what your major is at all. If anything, there is a general trend toward accepting diverse majors.

Anyway, this question is generally annoying and comes up repeatedly throughout the application cycle.

Technical degrees are hard because they are graded by examination, lend themselves to the curve and engineering/science professors tend to make difficult exams. Everything else is pretty much equal. Even your econ/finance degree.

The best major-selection advice: Pick a major that you enjoy, because you are more-likely to do well in those classes, and maybe end up as a reasonably well-adjusted person in the process.