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Author Topic: ...WAZIRISTAN...get ready...more to come....  (Read 20825 times)

Julie Fern

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Re: ...WAZIRISTAN...get ready...more to come....
« Reply #30 on: December 30, 2008, 10:47:56 AM »
your ability post articles quite masterful.  apparently this impress your barnyard girlfriends.

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Re: ...WAZIRISTAN...get ready...more to come....
« Reply #31 on: March 02, 2009, 05:42:34 PM »
john...here it is and you have to check the fifteenth and sixteenth  paragraph...guess who wrote it?


Obama has destroyed the anti-war Left
March 1st, 2009 11:04 pm  |  by "look it up" |  Published in Activism, Blowback, Commentary, Foreign Policy, Liberty, Politics, War, terrorism  |  (0 Comments)

What decade am I describing: The United State has chosen an impoverished, agrarian region halfway around the world to demonize and to pound into submission with its most advanced weaponry. The central governments of the region have never attacked the U.S., but we are told that militants in the area hate us and will harm us if allowed to. The U.S. strikes kill a certain number of politicized militants, along with hundreds of civilians, including, in large numbers, women and children.

The weak central governments within whose borders we operate have no ability to stay in power on their own, but are dependent on U.S. manipulation to hold up their political “leaders,” who routinely invite the U.S. to continue its assistance against their “insurgent” forces. Our President announces that in addition to the mechanized attacks on civilian areas of the region, he is significantly increasing U.S. ground forces, with a resultant rise in American troop deaths a certainty.

Have I describe the late 60’s and early 70’s, or today? Hard to tell, unless I add one more fact: The American public, including, in its entirety, the left, is entirely silent on the intervention. That makes it easy, doesn’t it? The period of time in question is right now. The target of our intervention is the border area between Pakistan and Afghanistan, and the President is Obama.


The problem with the left is that it has a hard time grasping that the American war movement, which I’ll call the MIC (after Eisenhower’s more descriptive “Military-Industrial Complex”), is managed by very clever people, fully capable of maneuvering and outwitting its opponents. The left is fond of mocking MIC thinkers as imbeciles, playground bullies who can’t think beyond a crude desire to beat someone up. That is far from the reality, as a quick history lesson will show.

The MIC in the 60’s was in a transitional stage, having recently emerged from the spotlight, the last of its kind, wielded by Eisenhower. The transition entailed a U.S. military and citizenry with a certain sense of being in the right, engendered by a morally clear World War, and fading but still present after the relatively clear Korean War. But mistakes were made by the MIC, as can happen in transition periods.

Most importantly, in invading Vietnam the MIC misjudged the American public’s willingness to attack an “enemy” that had not attacked us, that in fact seemed incapable of attacking us. It took a bit of time for the WWII generation to grasp the distinction on a wide scale, but the younger generation, subject to the draft, grasped it right away, and its opposition spread fast and furiously. The MIC was as much caught off-guard by the domestic opposition to the Vietnam War as it was by the Tet Offensive. It lost its balance and was never quite able to regain it. The rest is history.

But it is at this juncture that the left began to lose its advantage. It dismissed the MIC as brutish and un-intellectual, incapable of higher-order thinking on the level of the left. It mistakenly localized MIC thinking to intellectual organs of the right like The National Review which expressed an ideology that could be as easily opposed as supported, which presented no threat to the left’s clout.

But while Wm. F. Buckley et al were presenting erudite cases for sending B-52s to bomb mainland China and other schemes equally subject to refutation, the real MIC was focusing on more practical concerns. How do you get the American people to support a war whose only purpose is to secure oil or otherwise make money? The question was reduced to: How do we get support for an attack on people who have not attacked us? The answer was simple enough: There needs to be an attack on us.

At this point I’m going to distance myself from the idea that 9/11 was somehow engineered or allowed to happen by U.S. interests. No ordinary person is in a position know such a thing, and there isn’t much point in speculating about it. The fact is, though, that 9/11 happened, and it was the closest thing to a Pearl Harbor since Pearl Harbor. Whether or not there was MIC complicity or foreknowledge, 9/11 is the event that made possible the current scenario, and the MIC is using it to the fullest extent to solve the problem it encountered in the 60’s.

The region we are going to war against is, roughly, Waziristan, straddling the border between northwest-Pakistan and eastern Afghanistan, an area every bit as impoverished, non-industrial and remote as any area of Southeast Asia was. We are told, however, that this Waziristan attacked us, that it blew up the Twin Towers, killing thousands of American citizens. It is a super-threat and the entirety of American military might must be thrown against it. In the face of this reasoning, the left is stunningly silent. How can this be? Enter Obama.

Let’s preface the Obama story by positing that Bush made Obama possible. The contrast between the men is, most would agree, quite flattering to Obama. Bush is a crude speaker, a man born into power who never learned the subtle arts of cajoling regular folk, who seems not to know that such arts can be required- the antithesis of Obama.  Bush’s invasion of Iraq, also predicated on fears of our 9/11 enemies, made no attempt to establish a credible link between the attack and our response. The left experienced a resurgence under Bush, as even the organs of the MIC stated that the perpetrators of 9/11 operated out of mobile camps in Pakistan and Afghanistan, with little or no Iraqi connection.

It was based on the MIC’s own public intel that Obama was in a position to speak against the Iraq invasion, and it is based on MIC intel that Obama proclaimed that we must overthrow war-monger Bush by directing American military might against mobile camps using goat herders as cover. The left, so enamored by Obama’s status as the first black president, by his eloquence on behalf of the underprivileged (in such contrast to Bush’s preference for his own privileged class), is sold on him to an astounding degree.

Look no further than its silence when, a few days before the Democratic Convention that nominated Obama, CIA drones blew up a wedding party in Waziristan, killing 40. Even from official American sources, one gathers that there was not a confirmed militant among the party. We massacred the families and extended families of a young bride and groom. Obama said not a word, and the left faulted him not.

Here are the questions that a more principled anti-war movement than the one currently enjoying that designation would be asking:

What is Waziristan? It’s easier to say what it is not. It is not a country. It has no central government and no military, and cannot be a conventional threat to anyone. It is a region of semi-nomadic tribes with a history of violent opposition to outside, imposed authority. There is, however, no history of aggression beyond its medieval reach- in other words, there are no instances of Waziri attacks on faraway places like England of Russia. Rather, these tribal people identify with their historical region and do not like the presence in their midst of outside, imposed authority. They are provincial in nature; they do not obsess about international events, but rather look for ways to become wealthy and amass wives on their own turf. Left to themselves, they wouldn’t care about us.

Yes, Waziristan could indeed be home to dangerous people of the Al Qaeda type. It could even be the home of the very men who planned 9/11. So, for that matter, could London, or Los Angeles. After all, Al Qaeda is not a mass movement, is not associated with any nation-state or specific area. It appears to be a rather small outfit, though it is clearly supported, financially and logistically, by powerful, wealthy groups (though the left, apparently, does not think it necessary to identify those groups, or go after them directly). With such support, Al Qaeda operatives should be able to reside just about anywhere, and if fact we are informed by the CIA that we can expect them to roam freely throughout the U.S.


Consider also that Al Qaeda would not necessarily find a welcome in Waziristan. It is, after all, an outside force, originating and receiving early support from the middle-east. Why would this foreign element be accepted among Waziri tribespeople? Why would they go out of their way to hide and maintain Al Qaeda forces? They have no history of accepting outsiders, but the oft quoted wisdom of the middle-east, that “the enemy of my enemy is my friend,” obtains everywhere. If we blithely blow up wedding parties, without a peep from our President, press, or “anti-war” movement, will we not be perceived as racists, who would never blow up a city bus in, say, Paris, because we suspect an Al Qaeda leader is on board, but will slay Waziri civilians right and left in support of suspected evil?

A credible U.S. policy would be an attack on Al Qaeda suited to Al Qaeda’s nature, a strike one could call “surgical” in the true sense, where a small force infiltrates Al Qaeda cells and takes them out, much as we infiltrate American organized crime cells and take out their leaders without blowing up restaurants filled with innocent diners.

What about it, American Left? Any chance you could wake up from your current dream and smell the coffee? If not, the dustbin of history awaits you.

If you prick us, do we not bleed?  
  if you tickle us, do we not laugh? if you poison  
  us, do we not die? and if you wrong us, shall we not  
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Julie Fern

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Re: ...WAZIRISTAN...get ready...more to come....
« Reply #32 on: March 07, 2009, 06:01:43 AM »
yes,julie can tell from your apparent lack familiarty with subject-verb agreement you big writer.

not buying it,dipshit.

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Re: ...WAZIRISTAN...get ready...more to come....
« Reply #33 on: April 13, 2009, 09:15:37 PM »
Close aide of Baitullah Mehsud arrested

 By Faraz Khan

KARACHI: The Criminal Investigation Department (CID), in collaboration with an intelligence agency, has arrested a close aide of banned Tehreek-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) chief Baitullah Mehsud.

CID SSP Fayyaz Khan disclosed on Monday that 59-year-old Badshah Deen Mehsud, son of Gul Khadeen Mehsud, a resident of Shah Noorani Goth, Karachi and South Waziristan, was arrested from Pyala Hotel, which is located within the jurisdiction of Sachal police station.

Badshah, who speaks Urdu and Pashto, is affiliated with the TTP and is a close aide of Baitullah Mehsud. One of his sons, Mehrban is also working for the TTP. Mehrban is currently in Waziristan and comes to Karachi for terror activities. “Basically, Badshah provided logistical support to Mehsud. He was involved in various crimes including robbing money changers and banks, and providing vehicles and shelter to those working for TTP in Karachi,” said Khan, adding that he also provided medical treatment to the injured associates. Badshah was on CID’s wanted list in its Red Book, page No 41.

SSP Khan said that the raid for his arrest was conducted upon receiving information by an intelligence agency about the culprit’s whereabouts. Badshah also helped the TTP members when the Anti Violent Crime Unit and intelligence agency officials conducted a raid in Sohrab Goth area for the arrests of the terrorists involved in the kidnapping of renowned filmmaker and distributor Satish Anand. The filmmaker has now been released from the captivity of Ilyas Kashmiri, who currently is running the banned religious organisation Harkatul Jihadul Islami. “Further investigations are underway into the matter,” the SSP added.

If you prick us, do we not bleed?  
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  us, do we not die? and if you wrong us, shall we not  
  revenge? m.of v. w.shaka                                             speare

Julie Fern

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Re: ...WAZIRISTAN...get ready...more to come....
« Reply #34 on: June 03, 2009, 02:30:06 PM »
your cut-paste skills beyond compare!

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Re: ...WAZIRISTAN...get ready...more to come....
« Reply #35 on: June 03, 2009, 09:26:10 PM »
Pakistani Militants Abduct 400 Students in North Waziristan 
By Catherine Maddux
Islamabad
01 June 2009
 

Pakistani officials say Taliban militants in North Waziristan have kidnapped about 400 students at a military college in Bannu district. 

Police in Bannu district say the students were traveling in around 30 vehicles and were stopped Monday evening after leaving Razmak Cadet College by heavily armed militants. Police say two of those vehicles were able to reach a police station, but 28 remain missing.

A council of local tribal elders, known as a jirga, was quickly arranged to try to negotiate with the kidnappers, whose demands were not immediately known. The police say the militants are associated with extremists based in North and South Waziristan.

Shaukat Khattak is a Pakistani television journalist based in Peshawar. He says the students were most likely abducted because they are easy targets.

"They [the militants] are engaged in a war with against Pakistani forces, not only in Swat Valley, but in different areas in Waziristan," said Shaukat Khattak. "And I think the students were a soft target for them. That's why they've been kidnapped. Because there was no proper security for the students."

Reports in Pakistan about the incident are conflicting. Some media quote school officials as saying only two or three vehicles were taken. But Bannu district police say 28 vehicles were missing with hundreds of students being held captive.

North and South Waziristan are strongholds for the Taliban and al-Qaida. Pakistani military troops have clashed with militants in recent days in South Waziristan, even as they battle Taliban militants further north in Swat Valley. 

Top Taliban leaders have vowed to stage attacks to avenge the month-long military offensive in Swat Valley following the collapse of a controversial peace deal to impose strict Islamic law in the region.
If you prick us, do we not bleed?  
  if you tickle us, do we not laugh? if you poison  
  us, do we not die? and if you wrong us, shall we not  
  revenge? m.of v. w.shaka                                             speare

Julie Fern

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Re: ...WAZIRISTAN...get ready...more to come....
« Reply #36 on: June 04, 2009, 08:06:06 AM »
cut!  paste!

not you heard?  u.s. getting ass kicked.

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Re: ...WAZIRISTAN...get ready...more to come....
« Reply #37 on: June 08, 2009, 08:43:03 PM »
Angry Pakistani villagers fight, surround Taliban

By Kamran Haider
Reuters
Monday, June 8, 2009; 5:42 AM

ISLAMABAD (Reuters) - Pakistani villagers enraged with the Taliban after the bombing of a mosque battled the militants on Monday, underscoring a shift in public opinion away from the hardline Islamists.

The military has been fighting the Taliban in the Swat valley, northwest of the capital, for more than a month after the militants took advantage of a peace pact to conquer new areas.

In retaliation for the offensive, the Taliban have stepped up bomb attacks and are suspected of being behind a suicide blast at a mosque in the Upper Dir region, near Swat, that killed about 40 people on Friday.

Outraged by the attack, villagers formed a militia, known as a lashkar, of about 500 men and began fighting the militants on Saturday in an bid to force them out of their area.


A top government official in Upper Dir, Atif-ur-Rehman, said the militia fighters had pushed the Taliban out of three villages and surrounded them in another two.

"About 150 militants are believed to be there putting up resistance. But the villagers are doing well, they're squeezing the militants," Rehman told Reuters by telephone.

The United States, which needs sustained Pakistani action to help defeat al Qaeda and to cut off militant support for the Afghan Taliban, has been heartened by the resolve the government and military are showing in the Swat offensive.

Alarmed by the prospect of nuclear-armed Pakistan drifting into chaos, the United States had criticized a February pact with the Taliban in the former tourist valley of Swat.

The Swat offensive also has broad public support in a country where many people have long been suspicious of the United States and government critics have decried fighting "America's war."


The February pact aimed at placating the Taliban in Swat by introducing Islamic sharia law sailed through parliament with only one or two voices of dissent.

But much has changed since then.

A Taliban push into a district 100 km (60 miles) from Islamabad, a widely circulated video of Taliban flogging a teenaged girl and the Islamists' denunciation of the constitution as "unIslamic" have sharply shifted public opinion.

The villagers' action in Upper Dir is the latest in a series of instances of people turning on the Taliban. Rehman said security forces could help the militia if necessary.

"We don't want to step in right now as they're fighting at close quarters and there is a chance of losses on the villagers' side if we use artillery," he said.

While the government retains public support for the offensive, it could lose it if the 2.5 million people displaced by fighting in the northwest languish in misery.

The government is organizing relief with the help of the United Nations and other agencies but aid officials say Pakistan faces a long-term humanitarian crisis.


The military says it has snuffed out organized resistance in Swat and it hopes people can begin returning home after the middle of this month. On Monday, the military relaxed a curfew in areas near Swat to allow people to flee or shop for supplies.

Meanwhile, cities are on alert for bomb attacks.

Police in Karachi said on Sunday they had arrested an associate of Pakistani Taliban leader Baitullah Meshud and seized "jackets" to be used in suicide attacks. Police said the suspect had confessed to planning attacks.
If you prick us, do we not bleed?  
  if you tickle us, do we not laugh? if you poison  
  us, do we not die? and if you wrong us, shall we not  
  revenge? m.of v. w.shaka                                             speare

Julie Fern

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Re: ...WAZIRISTAN...get ready...more to come....
« Reply #38 on: June 09, 2009, 07:52:57 AM »
cut!  paste!

Julie Fern

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Re: ...WAZIRISTAN...get ready...more to come....
« Reply #39 on: July 07, 2009, 06:56:33 AM »
if tree fall forest and land you, anyone make sound?