Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: ...WAZIRISTAN...get ready...more to come....  (Read 20800 times)

! B L U E WAR R I O R..!

  • LSD Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 8173
  • "make a friend who was once a stranger" br.war.
    • View Profile
Re: ...WAZIRISTAN...get ready...more to come....
« Reply #50 on: July 27, 2009, 01:24:33 AM »
Better news from the frontier

Jul 23rd 2009

From The Economist

A modest success against the Taliban in Malakand; now the battle must be taken to more powerful militants

LONG reviled for their reluctance to fight the Islamist militancy that they themselves helped unleash, Pakistan’s generals have a rare victory to boast of. In a three-month offensive against the Taliban in North-West Frontier Province (NWFP), the army has regained control of the lofty Malakand region, killing hundreds of militants. This has done less damage to civilian life and property than two previous, failed offensives in Malakand. The local Pushtuns, over 2m of whom were displaced by the fighting, are now returning home. They mostly support the army’s efforts.

This success is not hard to fathom. The Taliban’s takeover in Malakand caused an outcry not just in Washington, DC, but also in Pakistan’s own media. Many blamed it on the army, which had made several truces with the militants in Malakand. Thus goaded, the top brass launched an unusually serious attack. Having previously failed to control Swat, the Taliban’s regional base, with a division, the generals sent in three divisions. Rather than allowing the militants to withdraw in good order, this time they chased them into Malakand’s hills.

There is much to celebrate in this, not least a hope that it will boost army morale. Over the course of a hapless six-year campaign in north-western Pakistan, the ideological aversion many Pakistani soldiers initially felt to killing their Muslim compatriots has often ceded to despair at their poor progress. Some 1,900 Pakistani troops have been killed and hundreds taken hostage, as the Taliban’s influence spread. It is therefore crucial that the army’s recent advances are not reversed. The generals seem to appreciate this. The troops are supposed to remain in Malakand for a year, while the local police force is retrained and enlarged. That is asking a lot of NWFP’s government, which must also swiftly restore refugees to their homes and rebuild shattered infrastructure. But if it fails, grievances will fester that the Taliban might well exploit.

The tougher forms of Taliban
Having done well in Malakand, the army should now be expected to put up a stiffer fight elsewhere—starting with a more hostile quarter, the semi-autonomous tribal agency of South Waziristan. On public demand, it is plotting a renewed campaign against the Pakistani Taliban’s supreme leader, Baitullah Mehsud, who has his fief there. This is overdue. Mr Mehsud is chiefly responsible for the suicide-blasts that have ripped through Pakistan’s main cities in recent years, terrorising Pakistanis and banishing foreign investors. Eliminating him may be hard; with the backing of his bellicose tribe, in remote terrain, Mr Mehsud is a more formidable militant than those in Swat. Yet, for the first time, it seems likely to happen.

This is welcome. But it is too soon to speak of a watershed in Pakistan’s faltering campaign against militancy. Success in South Waziristan, which Pakistan only notionally administers, would look much more modest than that in Malakand. To protect its supply-lines there, for example, the army may have to buy support from two other Taliban commanders. And having dealt with Mr Mehsud, in what would in effect be a joint operation with his Taliban rivals, the army may well intend to withdraw from South Waziristan. That would be wrong. If Pakistan is serious about defeating the Taliban, the tribal areas must be somewhat tamed.

With rough control over the tribal areas, the army could do a better job of quelling jihadist raids into Afghanistan. Several Pakistani militant leaders dedicate their forces chiefly to such jaunts—including the pair the army is allegedly courting in Waziristan. The army has not made much effort to stop them. The ostensible excuse—that it is unable to do so—looks less tenable now it has some military successes against the Taliban. But there remains a suspicion that some generals want Afghanistan’s government to fail. Recent moaning that the American-led surge in Afghanistan may drive militants over the border suggests that at best many are loth to help their neighbour.

How shortsighted. If, as Pakistan’s commanders also like to complain, their Taliban insurgency is largely a consequence of the jihad next-door, it is in their interest to try harder to help NATO and the Afghan government to end it. That would really be a watershed.
If you prick us, do we not bleed?  
  if you tickle us, do we not laugh? if you poison  
  us, do we not die? and if you wrong us, shall we not  
  revenge? m.of v. w.shaka                                             speare

Julie Fern

  • LSD Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 27223
  • hillary clinton say "boo!"
    • View Profile
Re: ...WAZIRISTAN...get ready...more to come....
« Reply #51 on: August 21, 2009, 08:23:07 AM »
kurds = turds.

! B L U E WAR R I O R..!

  • LSD Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 8173
  • "make a friend who was once a stranger" br.war.
    • View Profile
Re: ...WAZIRISTAN...get ready...more to come....
« Reply #52 on: August 21, 2009, 11:40:39 PM »
US Predators target the Haqqanis in North Waziristan

By Bill RoggioAugust 20, 2009 6:22 PM

An unmanned US Predator aircraft fired missiles at the Haqqani Network in Pakistan’s Taliban-controlled tribal area of North Waziristan.

Two Hellfire missiles struck in the town of Darpa Khel near Miramshah, a known stronghold of the Haqqani Network. Twelve Taliban fighters from Afghanistan were reported killed, but no high value Taliban or al Qaeda targets have been reported killed at this time.

A senior Haqqani Network commander and an al Qaeda operative were the targets of the strike, a US intelligence official told The Long War Journal. The official would not identify the names of the leaders targeted.

The strike in Danda Darpa Khel is the third in the town since September 2008. The Haqqani Network has a strong presence in the town. The Haqqanis' madrassa, known as the Manba Ulom, is in the town of Danda Darpa Khel. In the two strikes last year, the Manba Ulom compound was struck both times.

The Taliban have stepped up attacks against Pakistani military convoys, bases, and checkpoints in North Waziristan. Even though the Taliban have conducted several suicide attacks and ambushes against military convoys moving through the region, the military has only retaliated, usually with air and artillery strikes. The Pakistani military continues to insist that a 16-month-old peace agreement with North Waziristan Taliban leader Hafiz Gul Bahadar is intact.

Third strike this month

Today's attack in North Waziristan is only the third strike in August as well as the third since July 17. The last attack took place on Aug. 11 in South Waziristan. During the first 17 days of July, the US conducted seven airstrikes in Pakistan.

The US has shifted the focus of its covert air campaign in Pakistan's tribal areas almost exclusively to targeting Pakistani Taliban leader Baitullah Mehsud in South Waziristan. Of the 34 US strikes carried out in Pakistan this year, 24 have taken place in South Waziristan.

The US and Pakistani governments believe that Baitullah was killed in the Aug. 5 strike but have not provided evidence to back up the claim. The Taliban have insisted that Baitullah is alive but suffering from an illness. Just yesterday, Faqir Mohammed, Baitullah’s deputy, temporarily took control of the Taliban.

The US is well on its way to exceeding last year's total of 36 airstrikes in Pakistan.

Danda Darpa Khel and the Haqqani Network

The Manba Ulom madrassa was established by Jalaluddin Haqqani, the family patriarch and renowned mujahedeen commander who has close ties with Osama bin Laden and Mullah Omar. In the 1980s, the madrassa was used to train mujahedeen to fight the Soviet Union in Afghanistan. After the US invasion of Afghanistan in 2001, the Haqqani family used the Manba Ulom madrassa as a training center and meeting place for senior al Qaeda leaders.

The Pakistani government closed the madrassa down in 2002, but it was reopened in 2004. Since then, Taliban fighters and members of al Qaeda's network have been known to take shelter in the madrassa compound.

The madrassa serves as the headquarters for the Haqqani Network, while the forward operating command center in Afghanistan is located in the village of Zambar in the northern Sabari district of Khost province, Afghanistan. The network is active in the Afghan provinces of Khost, Paktia, Paktika, Ghazni, Logar, Wardak, and Kabul, and provides support to Taliban networks in Kunar, Nangarhar, Helmand, and Kandahar provinces.

The Haqqanis have extensive links with al Qaeda and with Pakistan’s military intelligence agency, the Inter-Service Intelligence, or ISI. These relationships have allowed the Haqqani Network to survive and thrive in North Waziristan. The Haqqanis control large swaths of North Waziristan, and run a parallel administration with courts, recruiting centers, tax offices, and security forces.

Siraj Haqqani, a son of Jalaluddin, has risen in prominence over the past year. He is believed to be the mastermind of the most deadly attacks inside Afghanistan and to be the senior military commander in eastern Afghanistan. The US military has described Siraj as the primary threat to security in eastern Afghanistan.

Siraj is considered dangerous not only for his ties with the Afghan Taliban, but also because of his connections with al Qaeda's central leadership, which extend all the way to Osama bin Laden. On March 25, the US Department of State put out a $5 million bounty for information leading to the capture of Siraj.


Background on US strikes against al Qaeda and Taliban networks in northwestern Pakistan
US intelligence believes that al Qaeda has reconstituted its external operations network in Pakistan's lawless, Taliban-controlled tribal areas. This network is tasked with hitting targets in the West, India, and elsewhere. The US has struck at these external cells using unmanned Predator aircraft and other means in an effort to disrupt al Qaeda's external network and decapitate the leadership. The US also has targeted al Qaeda-linked Taliban fighters operating in Afghanistan, particularly the notorious Haqqani Network.

As of last summer, al Qaeda and the Taliban operated 157 known training camps in the tribal areas and the Northwest Frontier Province. Al Qaeda has been training terrorists holding Western passports to conduct attacks, US intelligence officials have told The Long War Journal. Some of the camps are devoted to training the Taliban's military arm; some train suicide bombers for attacks in Pakistan and Afghanistan; some focus on training the various Kashmiri terror groups; some train al Qaeda operatives for attacks in the West; some train the Lashkar al Zil, al Qaeda's Shadow Army; and one serves as a training ground for the Black Guard, the elite bodyguard unit for Osama bin Laden, Ayman al Zawahiri, and other senior al Qaeda leaders.

There were 36 recorded cross-border attacks and attempts in Pakistan during 2008, according to numbers compiled by The Long War Journal. Twenty-nine of those attacks took place after Aug. 31. There were only 10 recorded strikes in 2006 and 2007 combined.

During 2008, the US strikes inside Pakistan's tribal areas killed five senior al Qaeda leaders. All five were involved in supporting al Qaeda's external operations directed at the West.

Abu Laith al Libi, a senior military commander in Afghanistan, was killed in a strike in North Waziristan in January 2008.

Abu Sulayman Jazairi, al Qaeda’s external operations chief, was killed in a strike in Bajaur in March 2008.

Abu Khabab al Masri, al Qaeda's weapons of mass destruction chief, and several senior members of his staff were killed in a strike in South Waziristan in July 2008.

Khalid Habib, the leader of al Qaeda's paramilitary Shadow Army, was killed in a region controlled by Baitullah Mehsud in South Waziristan in October 2008.

Abu Jihad al Masri, the leader of the Egyptian Islamic Group and a member of al Qaeda's top council, was killed in North Waziristan in October 2008.

In 2009, US strikes have killed two senior, long-time al Qaeda leaders. Osama al Kini and his senior aide, Sheikh Ahmed Salim Swedan, were killed in a New Year's Day strike in South Waziristan. Kini was al Qaeda's operations chief in Pakistan. Both men were behind the 1998 bombings of the US embassies in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania; and Nairobi, Kenya; which killed 224 civilians and wounded more than 5,000 others.



Read more: http://www.longwarjournal.org/archives/2009/08/us_predators_target.php#ixzz0OndpB3Bd
If you prick us, do we not bleed?  
  if you tickle us, do we not laugh? if you poison  
  us, do we not die? and if you wrong us, shall we not  
  revenge? m.of v. w.shaka                                             speare

! B L U E WAR R I O R..!

  • LSD Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 8173
  • "make a friend who was once a stranger" br.war.
    • View Profile
Re: ...WAZIRISTAN...get ready...more to come....
« Reply #53 on: September 01, 2009, 01:31:06 AM »
...ahha....


Pakistan Asks Swat Residents to Back Police After Mingora Bomb

 

By Paul Tighe and Khaleeq Ahmed

Aug. 31 (Bloomberg) -- Pakistan called on residents of the Swat Valley to help security forces tackle extremists after a suicide bomb attack in Mingora, the region’s main city, killed 16 trainee policemen.

The bombing yesterday at Mingora police station shows the “barbaric and retrogressive mindset” of the extremists, the state-run Associated Press of Pakistan cited Owais Ahmed Ghani, the governor of North West Frontier Province, as saying yesterday. People need to cooperate with security forces to ensure lasting peace in the region, he said.

The bomber may have jumped the wall at the police center and detonated his explosives while the trainees were exercising, APP reported, citing police. President Asif Ali Zardari and Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani condemned the attack.

Pakistan’s army said it retook control of the Swat Valley from Taliban fighters last month after a 10-week offensive. More than 1 million people who fled the conflict have returned to the region in recent weeks, according to the United Nations, many going to Mingora. The city had a population of 200,000 people before the fighting.

The extremists, who are already on the run, are killing civilians in frustration, APP cited Ghani as saying.

Pakistani soldiers arrested 44 militants during search operations in the Swat region, the army said yesterday.

Taliban Leadership

The Taliban leadership in Pakistan is “almost finished” after the death of Baitullah Mehsud, the leader of the Tehrik-e- Taliban Pakistan in the South Waziristan region bordering Afghanistan, Interior Minister Rehman Maliksaid yesterday.

Security forces are trying to ensure that the terrorists aren’t able to regroup, he said.

Taliban spokesman Maulvi Omar, who was arrested on Aug. 17, confirmed to his captors that Mehsud was killed in a U.S. missile strike earlier this month, the Dawn newspaper reported Aug. 19. Mehsud led the 5,000-member TTP, an alliance of about five groups he formed in 2007 in South Waziristan, according to the U.S. Military Academy’s Combating Terrorism Center at West Point.

U.S. government and military officials, including Richard Holbrooke, the special envoy for Pakistan and Afghanistan, and General Stanley McChrystal, the commander of U.S. and NATO forces in Afghanistan, pressed Pakistan to continue its offensives against the Taliban when they visited the capital, Islamabad, earlier this month.

President Barack Obama has said a U.S. non-military aid package to Pakistan worth $1.5 billion a year is conditional on the government cracking down on Taliban and al-Qaeda fighters in regions bordering Afghanistan.

Several vehicles carrying supplies for NATO forces in Afghanistan were set on fire by a bomb yesterday in Chaman, a Pakistani town near the border, APP reported, citing local police. Hundreds of trucks have been delayed near Chaman for the past two days because of security concerns, it said.

To contact the reporters on this story: Paul Tighe in Sydney at ptighe@bloomberg.net; Khaleeq Ahmed in Islamabad, Pakistan at paknews@bloomberg.net.
If you prick us, do we not bleed?  
  if you tickle us, do we not laugh? if you poison  
  us, do we not die? and if you wrong us, shall we not  
  revenge? m.of v. w.shaka                                             speare

Julie Fern

  • LSD Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 27223
  • hillary clinton say "boo!"
    • View Profile
Re: ...WAZIRISTAN...get ready...more to come....
« Reply #54 on: September 01, 2009, 07:25:01 AM »
please, tell us more.

! B L U E WAR R I O R..!

  • LSD Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 8173
  • "make a friend who was once a stranger" br.war.
    • View Profile
Re: ...WAZIRISTAN...get ready...more to come....
« Reply #55 on: September 02, 2009, 02:19:09 AM »
tell you more? you hear voices?  :D :D :D :D


please, tell us more.
If you prick us, do we not bleed?  
  if you tickle us, do we not laugh? if you poison  
  us, do we not die? and if you wrong us, shall we not  
  revenge? m.of v. w.shaka                                             speare

! B L U E WAR R I O R..!

  • LSD Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 8173
  • "make a friend who was once a stranger" br.war.
    • View Profile
Re: ...WAZIRISTAN...get ready...more to come....
« Reply #56 on: September 02, 2009, 02:20:52 AM »
Pakistani Forces Attack Militants in South Waziristan
 
By VOA News
26 August 2009
 

 
Pakistani officials say their helicopter gunships have stepped up attacks on Taliban targets in South Waziristan, near the Afghan border.

Security officials say Wednesday's military strikes were aimed at suspected militant hideouts east of South Waziristan's main town of Wana. They add that two soldiers have been killed in the operations.

The attacks come a day after commanders of the Pakistani Taliban announced that their former leader, Baitullah Mehsud, died Sunday from wounds suffered in a U.S missile strike more than two weeks earlier.

U.S. and Pakistani officials had said they believed Mehsud was killed in an August 5 missile strike in South Waziristan, but until Tuesday, the Taliban had insisted he was alive.

On Saturday, another Taliban commander said the group had named Hakimullah Mehsud to replace Mehsud
If you prick us, do we not bleed?  
  if you tickle us, do we not laugh? if you poison  
  us, do we not die? and if you wrong us, shall we not  
  revenge? m.of v. w.shaka                                             speare

Julie Fern

  • LSD Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 27223
  • hillary clinton say "boo!"
    • View Profile
Re: ...WAZIRISTAN...get ready...more to come....
« Reply #57 on: September 02, 2009, 08:37:25 PM »
you bucking for extra credit with your middle school teacher?

! B L U E WAR R I O R..!

  • LSD Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 8173
  • "make a friend who was once a stranger" br.war.
    • View Profile
Re: ...WAZIRISTAN...get ready...more to come....
« Reply #58 on: September 03, 2009, 02:23:43 AM »
....more operations to follow...pakistan is finally engaged in this...drones aid the battle...finally tribal leaders one at a time will turn this around for the region...and diplomacy will end this thing....


PAKISTAN: Tension in Waziristan prompts fear of further displacements   


ISLAMABAD, 2 September 2009 (IRIN) - Two suicide bombings which have claimed 38 lives over the past week have heightened tension in the tribal agency of South Waziristan, bordering Afghanistan: People fear a fierce army operation may be about to be launched.

The attacks - the first at the Torkham border post between Pakistan and Afghanistan on 27 August, and the second three days later in Mingora, the principal city of Swat - targeted security forces and have been claimed by the Pakistani Taliban.

"The security forces are determined to defeat anti-state elements and the operation against them is continuing at all levels," Brig Tahir Hamid, the army officer in charge of the operation in Swat, told the media after the Mingora attack.

The suicide attacks, which have raised fears of a Taliban revival, mean there is a greater likelihood of a full-fledged military operation in South Waziristan - now seen as the most important stronghold of the militants, say observers.

Last month, Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan announced its new leader following the death of Baitullah Mehsud, the man thought to be behind attacks which have claimed hundreds of lives in Pakistan over the past two years.

"All the terrorist elements have not yet been vanquished. There is a need to do more to defeat them," Mian Iftikhar Hussain, information minister for the North West Frontier Province (NWFP), said.

Displacement in North, South Waziristan
I am shifting my wife, my parents and my four children to Peshawar. I don't want to be caught in a situation where roads are closed due to fighting, or transport becomes impossible to find. 

At least 126,300 people have already fled from the adjoining North and South Waziristan agencies and have been registered, according to the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), in the Tank and Dera Ismail Khan Districts. It is not yet known how many more may join them, but people continue to leave the area each day.

"I am shifting my wife, my parents and my four children to Peshawar. I don't want to be caught in a situation where roads are closed due to fighting, or transport becomes impossible to find," Azim Wazir, 40, told IRIN from Wana, the principal city of South Waziristan.

Waziris are familiar with the destruction conflict can bring and there have indeed been periodic displacements from the agency.

UN agencies have been preparing for possible displacements from Waziristan. UN Humanitarian Coordinator in Pakistan Martin Mogwanja told a press conference in Islamabad "the number of IDPs eventually depends on the scale and nature of the military operation." He also said goods had been stockpiled at a base in Bhakkar District, Punjab Province, in preparation for such an eventuality.

As people displaced from Swat, Dir and Buner districts of NWFP return home and start re-building their lives, a fresh wave of displacements could lie just ahead, analysts say.

"We are scared of this. Things are very tense here and we believe it may be just weeks before we find ourselves caught in war," Azim Wazir said
If you prick us, do we not bleed?  
  if you tickle us, do we not laugh? if you poison  
  us, do we not die? and if you wrong us, shall we not  
  revenge? m.of v. w.shaka                                             speare

Julie Fern

  • LSD Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 27223
  • hillary clinton say "boo!"
    • View Profile
Re: ...WAZIRISTAN...get ready...more to come....
« Reply #59 on: September 03, 2009, 08:14:56 AM »
you still not going pass social studies.