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...WAZIRISTAN...get ready...more to come....
« on: August 15, 2008, 02:46:40 AM »
...usa is working the wazir region...putting the screws to "the organization" and the taliban...

...shock and awe...






 

 

 


 

 

 



       




 
July 29, 2008  Tuesday  Rajab 25, 1429 





Missile raid on S. Waziristan; six killed




Bureau Report

PESHAWAR, July 28: A missile apparently fired from a Predator drone killed at least six people on Monday in a compound in South Waziristan, near the Afghan border.

A security official said the strike might have killed a senior Al Qaeda trainer known for his expertise in chemicals. The official put the death toll at 12.

“Our report suggests that the missile strike might have killed Abu Khabab Al Misri. But it remains unconfirmed,” the official cautioned.

The 55-year-old Midhat Mursi As-Sayid Umar alias Abu Khabab was earlier reported to have been killed in a US missile strike in Bajaur’s Damadola area in Jan 2006. However, later reports showed that he was not among those killed.

He was a trainer at an Al Qaeda facility in Darunta, near Jalalabad, in the late 1990s.

A graduate in science from an Egyptian university, Abu Khabab was considered to be an expert in conventional explosives and some western media reports said he headed a project named Al Zabadi, or ‘curdled milk’, for making chemical and biological weapons.

The US had offered a $5 million reward on information leading to his capture.

A military spokesman declined to comment. “There is a problem at the local level. We have not received a detailed report. No one has been able to reach there and get details of the information. Therefore, I cannot really make a comment,” Maj-Gen Athar Abbas told Dawn.

A resident of Wana said two missiles struck a seminary and an adjoining compound in the Zyara Leetha area of Azam Warsak early in the morning, killing six people and wounding a woman and her two children.

He said tribal militants immediately encircled the scene of the attack and kept locals at bay. “We are not being allowed to go near the site.”

A local militant commander, Maulvi Nazir, said the strike had left seven people dead. Among them were the head of a seminary and students, he said.

Sources said the woman and two children wounded in the missile strike were the wife and children of Abu Khabab. They said others killed in the strike included Mohammad Hudaifa, Khalid Al Misri and two Saudi citizens. The information could not be verified by independent sources.

 
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Julie Fern

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Re: ...WAZIRISTAN...get ready...more to come....
« Reply #1 on: August 15, 2008, 08:22:17 AM »
sure.  gump really gonnna do something now, right?

he had his chance.

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Re: ...WAZIRISTAN...get ready...more to come....
« Reply #2 on: August 15, 2008, 10:01:08 AM »
9 Suspected Insurgents Killed in Missile Strike, Pakistanis Say
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By ASSOCIATED PRESS
Published: August 13, 2008
DERA ISMAIL KHAN, Pakistan (AP) — A missile strike in a Pakistani tribal region killed at least nine suspected insurgents, including foreigners, Pakistani officials said Wednesday, raising suspicions that the United States was again seeking out militants in Pakistan.

A spokesman for the American military denied that it was behind the four missiles, which reportedly struck late Tuesday, destroying a compound in a mountainous area near Angore Adda in South Waziristan. However, past strikes are believed to have been conducted by the Central Intelligence Agency using Predator drones.

The tribal regions are considered havens for militants linked to Al Qaeda and the Taliban who plot and stage attacks on United States and NATO forces in Afghanistan, and the United States has repeatedly urged Pakistan to bring those areas under control. The missile strikes, however, have strained ties between the United States and Pakistan.

A Pakistani military official said at least nine people died in the latest strike. Two Pakistan intelligence service officials said 22 to 25 people — including Arabs, Turkmens and Pakistani militants — died in the strike, which was apparently launched from Afghanistan.

They said the camp was linked to the group of the Afghan warlord Gulbuddin Hekmatyar, whose followers are fighting in Afghanistan. They said it was not clear if the camp leader, an Afghan identified as Cmdr. Zangeer, or other senior militants had been killed.

A Foreign Ministry spokesman, Mohammed Sadiq, said he had no official information on the strike. In the past, Pakistan has decried the missile strikes as violations of its sovereignty.

An American military spokesman in Afghanistan, First Lt. Nathan Perry, said, “I’ve got no reports of any border incidents, any cross-border incidents, so it wasn’t us.”

Pakistan’s army spokesman was not available for comment. The other Pakistani officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak to the news media.

Suspected American missile strikes have killed at least two senior Qaeda militants inside Pakistan this year, including an Egyptian explosives and poison expert, Abu Khabab al-Masri, who died in a strike in South Waziristan in July.

Separately on Wednesday, Pakistani forces backed by helicopter gunships pounded militant positions in the Bajur tribal region in an operation that has displaced thousands of people.

At least 25 suspected militants were killed on Wednesday and another 30 were wounded in airstrikes in several villages in the region, military officials said.

There has been no way to independently confirm the death toll.

Early Wednesday, gunmen attacked the headquarters of a banned militant group in the Khyber tribal region and shot its leader dead, his spokesman said.

The leader, Hajji Namdar, died of his wounds after he was taken to a hospital from the shooting in Barqambarkhel, about seven miles from the region’s main town of Bara, said the spokesman, Munsaf Khan.

His Vice and Virtue Movement was among three groups banned in June when security forces started an operation to curb militancy and lawlessness in Khyber, amid concern that the main northwestern city of Peshawar could be under threat.

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Julie Fern

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Re: ...WAZIRISTAN...get ready...more to come....
« Reply #3 on: August 15, 2008, 04:28:36 PM »
it funny howe, for all his belligerence, gump not very good at fighting terrorists.

apparently gump figfure his boy musharraf going down anyway and so he better pretend do something before big switch occur.

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Re: ...WAZIRISTAN...get ready...more to come....
« Reply #4 on: August 16, 2008, 12:24:14 PM »
Hundreds dead in fighting along Afghanistan-Pakistan border
By James Cogan
16 August 2008
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Pakistan’s Federally Administered Tribal Agencies (FATA) and North West Frontier Province (NWFP) have been plunged into the heaviest fighting between government troops and Islamist and Pashtun tribal militants in more than two years. Fierce battles have taken place this week in Bajaur, the northern-most tribal agency, which borders Afghanistan’s Konar province. Dozens of fighters on both sides have been killed and tens of thousands of civilians have been forced to flee their homes.

The chief secretary of the FATA, Habibullah Khan, told Agence France-Presse: “We have around 135,000 people who have left their homes there [Bajaur]. We have directed officials in adjoining districts to provide shelter, food and health care to the migrating families. We are setting up more camps to help these people, just like refugees.”

The Pakistani military offensive in Bajaur and the tremendous human suffering it is causing are the direct outcome of US pressure on the new civilian government of Prime Minister Yousuf Rusa Gilani, which took power after elections in February. With increasing heat, the Bush administration and US military commanders have demanded that Gilani order a full-scale crackdown to prevent Afghan guerilla fighters using the FATA as a base for their war against the US and NATO forces occupying Afghanistan.

The Bajaur agency is under the effective control of militants loyal to Maulvi Omar and Faqir Mohammad, the local representatives of the Pakistani Tehrik-e-Taliban movement. It is believed to be one of the main bases for Afghan warlord Gulbuddin Hekmatyar’s Hezb-e Islami movement, which is fighting the US-led occupation in an alliance with supporters of the former Taliban regime. It is alleged that Al Qaeda members are also hiding out in its rugged terrain.

Several hundred militants from Bajaur are believed to have crossed into Afghanistan on July 13 to attack a newly established American post in the Wanat district of Konar. Nine US soldiers were killed and 15 wounded in one of the costliest days for American forces since the October 2001 invasion.

On August 6, some 200 to 300 troops of the Pakistani paramilitary Frontier Corps made what appears to have been a poorly planned attempt to reoccupy abandoned posts near the town of Loyesam and cut off insurgent routes over the border. They came under almost immediate attack by heavily armed tribal fighters.

After three days of fighting, the government troops pulled back, leaving behind over 70 dead or captured and several tanks and armoured vehicles. Since last weekend, Taliban fighters have established defensive positions in the villages surrounding the agency capital, Khar. They have reportedly blocked the main highway line linking Bajaur with the adjoining agency of Mohmand and seized the rail line to the capital of NWFP, Peshawar.

Reports indicate that the Pakistani military has been pounding the Taliban positions with jet fighters and helicopter gunships throughout the week. Dozens of houses, several mosques and at least one school have been reduced to rubble. On Tuesday, Pakistani officials claimed they had killed a senior Al Qaeda leader, Abu Saeed al-Masri, also known as Mustafa Abu al-Yazid. Yazid was alleged to have played a major role in plotting the September 11 attacks and terrorist operations since.

The claim has not been confirmed and may be an attempt to refute recent US accusations that sections of the Pakistani intelligence services are still assisting Islamic extremists, as they officially did until 2001. Government spokesmen have also downplayed their own losses while claiming that “hundreds” of Taliban militants have been killed. The exact number of casualties from the week’s fighting is shrouded by the contradictory reports.

Bajaur is now the third battleground in the Pashtun regions of Pakistan. Fighting was already taking place in the Swat Valley district of NWFP and in areas of the Khyber tribal agency, to the west of Peshawar. The next areas that are likely to be targeted are the agencies of South and North Waziristan—the strongholds of the overall leader of the Pakistani Taliban, Baitullah Mehsud. The area is also the base for the Afghan Taliban warlord Jalaluddin Haqqani. Numerous passes exist in the mountainous region through which his fighters can move into southern Afghanistan.

On Tuesday, Taliban spokesman Maulvi Omar told the Associated Press that the government operations in the Swat Valley and the tribal agencies meant “it is an open war between us and them.” The same day, a Taliban bomb destroyed a military van as it left Peshawar. The massive blast hit other vehicles in the vicinity, killing a five-year-old girl. Nine Pakistani Air Force personnel and civilian employees in the van were killed.

On Thursday, a suicide bomber detonated an explosion outside a police station in the city of Lahore, the capital of Punjab province and far from the front line of the conflict. Seven people were killed. The attack may signal the beginning of a concerted campaign of Islamist bombings targeting Pakistan’s major population centres. Last week, nine prospective suicide bombers from South Waziristan were arrested in Lahore in possession of explosive-laden vests and small arms.


An extension of the Afghan war

The growing violence in Pakistan is an extension of the US military attempt to turn Afghanistan into an American client state in Central Asia. If the insurgent safe havens in Pakistan cannot be closed down, the US and NATO forces occupying Afghanistan face what a British commander referred to as a “generational war”—a conflict lasting for another 20 years and consuming vast resources.

Occupation troops and the Afghan government army and police control the main cities and towns and can secure strategic roads, bridges and landing strips. Insurgents, however, move with relative impunity in the countryside. Large sections of the Pashtun population in southern and eastern Afghanistan openly support the resistance to the US and NATO invaders and provide assistance and information. When necessary, the insurgents can retreat over the border to bases in Pakistan to re-supply, treat their wounded and train new forces.

A classic guerilla war is taking place. Insurgent operations along the major highways linking Kabul with cities in the south and east are creating havoc for the occupation forces. Over recent months, bridges have been destroyed and dozens of supply convoys ambushed. An anonymous manager of a western company contracted to truck supplies to NATO forces told the British Financial Times this week: “In the summer months, I would expect to be attacked once or twice a week.”

If you prick us, do we not bleed?  
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  us, do we not die? and if you wrong us, shall we not  
  revenge? m.of v. w.shaka                                             speare

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Re: ...WAZIRISTAN...get ready...more to come....
« Reply #5 on: August 16, 2008, 12:30:52 PM »
A Kabul-based fuel trader, Matthew Leeming, reported: “The Taliban’s new tactics of blowing up bridges between Kabul and Kandahar, forcing convoys to slow down and become softer targets, is causing severe problems to companies trying to supply Kandahar from Kabul.” In a major attack in June, a convoy of 50 trucks was virtually destroyed.

Over the past week, at least 20 US and NATO troops have been killed or wounded by roadside bombings, ambushes or suicide bombings in various parts of Afghanistan, though mainly in the provinces that border Pakistan. Three American soldiers were killed on Thursday by an explosion and two more on Friday in a Taliban ambush. For the third month in a row, more US troops have been killed in Afghanistan than in Iraq.

Overall, 573 American soldiers have died in the Afghan theatre since October 2001, with close to 2,500 wounded. Britain has lost 115 dead and Canada 90. In a rare attack in the northern areas of the country, where other NATO countries provide most of the occupation troops, the first Latvian soldier to die in the war was killed by a roadside bomb on Monday in the province of Faryab.

The desperation of the occupation forces is reflected in the virtually daily killing of Afghan civilians by indiscriminate air strikes or trigger-happy troops at checkpoints. On Tuesday, British soldiers in Helmand province shot dead a man who did not slow down as he approached a road block. The following day, British forces severely wounded three people in a car that tried to overtake a line of traffic.

The occupation forces are now carrying out more than 20 air strikes on alleged but unconfirmed Taliban targets every day in Afghanistan. Afghan officials reported that an attack last Saturday in the province of Kapisa killed 12 civilians and wounded 18 others.

The NATO-commanded International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) admitted in a press release that at least eight Afghan civilians were killed by helicopter gunships that were called in after an ambush on Australian troops on Monday. ISAF claimed that 25 other people killed by the gunships were all Taliban fighters.

More than 1,000 Afghan civilians have been killed this year as a result of insurgent attacks or by the occupation forces, as well as 1,500 to 2,000 alleged guerillas. As the carnage escalates and the hatred of the Afghan people toward the US-led occupation mounts, so do the calls in the United States for more troops to be sent and for the US military to conduct its own hot pursuits and air strikes over the border into Pakistan. The campaign is being spearheaded by Democratic Party presidential candidate Barack Obama, who has made the escalation of the Afghan war the centre-piece of his foreign policy.

The Pakistani government, fearful of popular opposition to any such incursions, formally denies the US permission to carry out attacks on its territory. The ongoing air strikes on militant camps, however, make clear that covert operations are taking place. On Tuesday evening, an unmanned American Predator surveillance aircraft fired missiles into an alleged Taliban safe-house in South Waziristan, killing at least nine people.

If the Pakistani military proves incapable or unwilling to subjugate the tribal agencies, the next stage of a war that has already dragged on for close to seven years may well be American ground troops crossing the border to attack guerilla safe havens.
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Re: ...WAZIRISTAN...get ready...more to come....
« Reply #6 on: August 19, 2008, 01:38:24 AM »
Taliban kill tribesman 'spy' in Pakistani tribal area
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Updated Mon Aug 18, 2008 4:27am AEST


Taliban militants have shot dead a tribesman in a Pakistani tribal area, accusing him of spying for the US-led military in Afghanistan.

Officials say the body of the man, identified as Said Munir, was found about 60 kilometres west of Miranshah, the main town of volatile North Waziristan tribal district.

The militants left a note on the body saying "he was spying for American forces and anyone spying on the Taliban will be killed like him,".

Militants have killed several tribesmen, accusing them of spying on their activities on behalf of US forces operating across the border in Afghanistan.

Pakistan's newly elected government has drawn criticism from Western allies for earlier negotiations with Taliban militants based near the rugged Afghan frontier.
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  us, do we not die? and if you wrong us, shall we not  
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Re: ...WAZIRISTAN...get ready...more to come....
« Reply #7 on: August 22, 2008, 01:11:55 AM »


Al Qaeda safe house targeted in South Waziristan strike
By Bill RoggioAugust 20, 2008 10:16 PM
 
Pakistan, Afghanistan, and the tribal areas. Map from PBS' Frontline. Click to view.
 
An attack on an al Qaeda safe house in Pakistan's lawless tribal agency of South Waziristan killed at least eight, including foreign terrorists, security officials in Pakistan told AFP.

Reports indicate two missiles struck home that served as "a known hideout for militants" in the town of Wana. The home was owned by a tribesman named Haji Yaqub. "Arabs often stayed with him," a resident in Wana told AFP. Yaqub was reported wounded in the strike. There have been no reports of senior al Qaeda leaders killed in the attack.

The Pakistani military was unable to confirm the details of the attack. "What report we have received is that there is an explosion in a house in Wana," Military spokesman Major General Athar Abbas said. "There are also casualties, but we do not have any confirmation. It is also not confirmed whether it was a missile."

The Pakistani military has a presence on the outskirts of South Waziristan. The military withdrew from bases in South Waziristan after taking heavy casualties and having forts overrun in late 2007 and early 2008.

South Waziristan is a known safe haven for al Qaeda, the Taliban, and allied terrorist movements. Baitullah Mehsud, the leader of the Movement of the Taliban in Pakistan, is based in South Waziristan. Baitullah has conducted a vicious suicide campaign throughout Pakistan and an effective military campaign in the tribal areas.

The Taliban, al Qaeda, and allied terrorist groups have established 157 training camps and more than 400 support locations in the tribal areas and the Northwest Frontier Province, US intelligence officials have told The Long War Journal. Last year, 29 camps were reported to be in operation in North and South Waziristan.

Targeting al Qaeda's safe havens

This year's attack tempo on Taliban and al Qaeda havens in Pakistan is higher than previous years. Ten camps and safe houses were confirmed to have been targeted by the US military in 2006 and 2007. The Wana attack is the seventh confirmed US strike on al Qaeda and Taliban safe houses and camps in Pakistan this year.

Three senior al Qaeda commanders have been killed in this year's strikes.

The US military killed Abu Khabab al Masri during a targeted strike on an al Qaeda safe house in the village of Zeralita in the Azam Warsak region of South Waziristan on July 28. Khabab was al Qaeda's chief bomb maker and headed its chemical and biological weapons programs.

On May 14, a US strike killed Abu Sulayman Jazairi, in an airstrike against a Taliban and al Qaeda safe house in the town of Damadola in Pakistan’s Bajaur tribal agency along with 13 associates. Jazairi was a senior Algerian operative for al Qaeda’s central organization who directed the group’s external operations. He is described as a senior trainer, an explosives expert, and an operational commander tasked with planning attacks on the West.

Abu Laith al Libi was killed in a US strike inside the North Waziristan tribal agency in Pakistan in late January. Al Libi was the leader of the Libyan Islamic Fighting Group and served as a chief spokesman for al Qaeda. Laith also commanded al Qaeda forces in Afghanistan.

Pakistani sources have put out false reports of the death of three senior al Qaeda and Taliban leaders this summer. Ayman al Zawahiri, al Qaeda's second in command, was rumored to have been killed in the South Waziristan strike that killed Khabab. Zawahiri appeared on a videotape a week later, urging Pakistanis to fight the government.

The Pakistani military speculated that Faqir Mohammed, the Taliban emir, or leader in Bajaur and the deputy leader of the Movement of the Taliban in Pakistan, was killed during fighting against Pakistani forces in the tribal agency on August 15. Faqir later spoke to a Pakistani television station.

Mustafa Abu Yazid, al Qaeda's commander in Afghanistan, was also reported killed during the heavy fighting in Bajaur last week. Al Qaeda never confirmed Yazid's death, and the Pakistani military and intelligence agencies never presented evidence he was killed.

While the strikes have disrupted al Qaeda's senior leadership, they have done little to disrupt the growth of al Qaeda and the Taliban in northwestern Pakistan.


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  us, do we not die? and if you wrong us, shall we not  
  revenge? m.of v. w.shaka                                             speare

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Re: ...WAZIRISTAN...get ready...more to come....
« Reply #8 on: August 27, 2008, 01:06:14 AM »
After Bajaur, Pak Taliban declare truce in South Waziristan Agency too
Karachi News.Net
Tuesday 26th August, 2008 (ANI)

Wana (Pakistan), Aug 26 : Exactly a day after the Tehreek-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) had called for a ceasefire in the Bajaur Agency, the extremist group led by pro-government militant commander Maulvi Nazir last evening announced a unilateral ceasefire in the South Waziristan Agency (SWA) following fierce clashes with security forces.

A Jirga of local tribal elders held an emergency meeting with political agent Syed Shahab Ali Shah and informed him of the frequent violation of Pakistan's airspace by the US spy planes and carrying out air strikes in the Agency, killing innocent tribesmen in the name of al-Qaeda, The News quoted TTP sources as saying.

The 40-member Jirga comprising tribal elders of the area including Malik Baa Khan Wazir, Malik Sarwar Khan, Malik Ajmal Wazir, Malik Sharif and Malik Rasul Khan represented the Ahmadzai Wazirs tribal elders in the Jirga.

The Jirga assured the political agent of their cooperation in maintaining law and order in the area and convinced the official that in future Ahmadzai Wazir tribesmen would refrain from attacking security forces.

They added that under the collective responsibility section of the Frontier Crimes Regulations (FCR), they would be responsible to the political administration.

If you prick us, do we not bleed?  
  if you tickle us, do we not laugh? if you poison  
  us, do we not die? and if you wrong us, shall we not  
  revenge? m.of v. w.shaka                                             speare

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Re: ...WAZIRISTAN...get ready...more to come....
« Reply #9 on: September 17, 2008, 12:01:17 AM »
US spy planes make flights over Waziristan

Daily Times Monitor

LAHORE: United States spy planes on Sunday once again made flights over areas of North and South Waziristan agencies, creating panic among the locals.

According to Express News, US drones flew over the Ghulam Khan, Saidki, Miranshahand Miral areas of North Waziristan and Angoor Adda area of South Waziristan. The latest flights have added to the panic and fear among the locals who were already worried by US drone attacks into Pakistan, the channel said, adding that a US spy plane fled the airspace of N Waziristan agency airspace after flights by Pakistani fighter jets in the area on Saturday.

If you prick us, do we not bleed?  
  if you tickle us, do we not laugh? if you poison  
  us, do we not die? and if you wrong us, shall we not  
  revenge? m.of v. w.shaka                                             speare