Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: Law Schools Placing Well in DC  (Read 1907 times)

pd112aux

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 25
    • View Profile
Re: Law Schools Placing Well in DC
« Reply #10 on: August 02, 2008, 03:49:24 PM »
My mistake.  But they're representative of most of the other firms on NALP, all of which take fewer than 50 people.  Since DC is a popular yet small market, I'm sure that most "good" DC firms could fill their ranks with HYSCCN types.

And MV types.  With a good amount of GULC grads.

That surprised me quite a bit.  Take for example Skadden's DC office: 37 GULC associates v. 19 YHS (9/9/1).

Lindbergh

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 4358
    • View Profile
Re: Law Schools Placing Well in DC
« Reply #11 on: August 02, 2008, 04:28:17 PM »
I want to live in the Washington DC area upon graduation from law school, as I would eventually like to get into politics.  Besides the obvious (American, George Mason, George Washington, and Georgetown), what other schools place well in the DC area?  Are there any out of the DC area that place well in the DC area?  I've heard W&L does, but that's it.

By the way, I'm excluding T14's from my list because I know they would place well most anywhere, but I don't have the numbers to get in there.

Is this a reasonable ambition?  You might be better off as a mayor, or a state legislator.  I know that at least a few graduates of my T14 are currently serving as the latter, in places as far removed from federal politics as Alaska.

What makes you think that working in DC will help you break into politics?

It's good that you focus on this point.  Working for a law firm in D.C. probably won't help you much in terms of breaking into politics.  In fact, If you really want to get into politics, you should probably attend your flagship state school, make local/state connections, and work for your local congressperson or Senator.  Eventually, you could hopefully transfer to their D.C. office, or run for office yourself, but you'll generally be better off going that way than attending a D.C. school. 

This would also keep your costs down, which is important when working in politics, as it doesn't pay much.

Here's the alternative view: if you attend a DC school, you're still there when everybody else goes home.  So if you're willing to haul ass during the academic year, Congressional committees and offices seek externs all the time.  Play your cards right, and I think you can be set.

I guess this is true as well, although it seems to assume that the OP wants to work in politics right out of law school.  His post indicates that he wants to work in a firm first, as he's worried about placement, and says "eventually" with regard to politics. 

It also depends on what he means by "get into" politics.  If he wants to run for office, the conventional wisdom (that I've seen) is that you're best off attending your state school, building networks, volunteering and interning at the local level, etc.  That could eventually position you for a run for Congress.  If he just wants to work for someone on capitol hill, your approach might be easiest. 

Lindbergh

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 4358
    • View Profile
Re: Law Schools Placing Well in DC
« Reply #12 on: August 02, 2008, 04:31:49 PM »
My mistake.  But they're representative of most of the other firms on NALP, all of which take fewer than 50 people.  Since DC is a popular yet small market, I'm sure that most "good" DC firms could fill their ranks with HYSCCN types.

And MV types.  With a good amount of GULC grads.

That surprised me quite a bit.  Take for example Skadden's DC office: 37 GULC associates v. 19 YHS (9/9/1).


Not too surprising.  HYSCMV grads go all over the country, but the remaining T14's have traditionally been more focused on their specific regions, especially since they had large local urban markets to feed students into.  A large proportion of GULC grads remain in D.C..  (The Supply/Demand dynamics this creates, however, is why you'd probably have better odds of placing in D.C. coming from another T14, unless you're planning on doing the legwork yourself while you're in school.)

Kirk Lazarus

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 2042
  • I'm a lead farmer, mofo
    • View Profile
Re: Law Schools Placing Well in DC
« Reply #13 on: August 02, 2008, 05:44:40 PM »
My mistake.  But they're representative of most of the other firms on NALP, all of which take fewer than 50 people.  Since DC is a popular yet small market, I'm sure that most "good" DC firms could fill their ranks with HYSCCN types.

And MV types.  With a good amount of GULC grads.

That surprised me quite a bit.  Take for example Skadden's DC office: 37 GULC associates v. 19 YHS (9/9/1).


Not too surprising.  HYSCMV grads go all over the country, but the remaining T14's have traditionally been more focused on their specific regions, especially since they had large local urban markets to feed students into.  A large proportion of GULC grads remain in D.C..  (The Supply/Demand dynamics this creates, however, is why you'd probably have better odds of placing in D.C. coming from another T14, unless you're planning on doing the legwork yourself while you're in school.)

lol. Something tells me you got to Mich or Virgina.
YLS c/o 2009

Lindbergh

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 4358
    • View Profile
Re: Law Schools Placing Well in DC
« Reply #14 on: August 02, 2008, 09:44:13 PM »
My mistake.  But they're representative of most of the other firms on NALP, all of which take fewer than 50 people.  Since DC is a popular yet small market, I'm sure that most "good" DC firms could fill their ranks with HYSCCN types.

And MV types.  With a good amount of GULC grads.

That surprised me quite a bit.  Take for example Skadden's DC office: 37 GULC associates v. 19 YHS (9/9/1).


Not too surprising.  HYSCMV grads go all over the country, but the remaining T14's have traditionally been more focused on their specific regions, especially since they had large local urban markets to feed students into.  A large proportion of GULC grads remain in D.C..  (The Supply/Demand dynamics this creates, however, is why you'd probably have better odds of placing in D.C. coming from another T14, unless you're planning on doing the legwork yourself while you're in school.)

lol. Something tells me you got to Mich or Virgina.

Nope, Michigan and UVa are simply among the most national schools in the country in terms of placement, after Harvard.  (Probably more so than Stanford, whose grads tend to favor the West Coast somewhat.)  This is partly due to their not having a major local market nearby, and partly due to them having a strong national reputation traditionally.  Both place a good amount in D.C., especially UVa, which probably places more grads in D.C. than CCN.  (D.C. is the closest thing UVa has to a home market, and it's highly respected there.)

If you're referring to my comment about "a good amount of GULC grads", I probably should've said "and, obviously, a ton of GULC grads".  You'll certainly find more GULC grads in D.C. than grads from any other school.

If you're referring to my exclusion of CLS, NYU and the other T14 from my reference, it's because they, as noted, have large home markets that they send a disproportionate share of their graduates into, particularly NYU.  (For some reason, UC doesn't do so as much.) 

If you check the Leiter and Ciolli national placement rankings, I think they'll bear this out.  Obviously, this is largely due to self-selection, especially with schools like NYU and Boalt, but that wasn't my point.

timebomb116

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 8
    • View Profile
Re: Law Schools Placing Well in DC
« Reply #15 on: August 03, 2008, 03:35:14 PM »
what about University of Maryland?  Good public school with great regional rep.

Lindbergh

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 4358
    • View Profile
Re: Law Schools Placing Well in DC
« Reply #16 on: August 03, 2008, 04:30:08 PM »
what about University of Maryland?  Good public school with great regional rep.

It's a decent school, and obviously people in D.C. know about it.  However, you'll generally have to do pretty well in your class at UMD to get a job in D.C..  As noted, you have the T14 all sending tons of grads to D.C., including the factory that is GULC, and you then have higher-ranked schools like GW, W&L, W&M, GMU and even American filling in most of the remaining slack, along with competitors like Catholic. 

DC is one of the most competitive markets in the country.

amassherst

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 70
    • View Profile
Re: Law Schools Placing Well in DC
« Reply #17 on: August 03, 2008, 04:40:30 PM »
Quote from: slinkman116 on Today at 03:35:14 PM
what about University of Maryland?  Good public school with great regional rep.

It's a decent school, and obviously people in D.C. know about it.  However, you'll generally have to do pretty well in your class at UMD to get a job in D.C..  As noted, you have the T14 all sending tons of grads to D.C., including the factory that is GULC, and you then have higher-ranked schools like GW, W&L, W&M, GMU and even American filling in most of the remaining slack, along with competitors like Catholic.

DC is one of the most competitive markets in the country.

^Any other thoughts on American?  It's not discussed much on LSD and it's a place that I may be looking at.  I don't have a shot at GULC nor GWU in D.C., so American would probably me my most solid choice of school in that area.  So, when you write "...and even American" I just wondered if it's not very highly respected or something like that. 

Lindbergh

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 4358
    • View Profile
Re: Law Schools Placing Well in DC
« Reply #18 on: August 03, 2008, 04:51:25 PM »
Quote from: slinkman116 on Today at 03:35:14 PM
what about University of Maryland?  Good public school with great regional rep.

It's a decent school, and obviously people in D.C. know about it.  However, you'll generally have to do pretty well in your class at UMD to get a job in D.C..  As noted, you have the T14 all sending tons of grads to D.C., including the factory that is GULC, and you then have higher-ranked schools like GW, W&L, W&M, GMU and even American filling in most of the remaining slack, along with competitors like Catholic.

DC is one of the most competitive markets in the country.

^Any other thoughts on American?  It's not discussed much on LSD and it's a place that I may be looking at.  I don't have a shot at GULC nor GWU in D.C., so American would probably me my most solid choice of school in that area.  So, when you write "...and even American" I just wondered if it's not very highly respected or something like that. 

American's a good school, but it suffers from the same problems at UMD -- it's situated in one of the most competitve markets in the country.  It's borderline T1/T2 most years, and it used to be the #3 local school in the market, but now it's basically #4 after GMU, so that can make things tough.  Of course, if you do well at AU, you can get biglaw, but if you don't, you're going to be struggling, like most grads from most schools. 

Of course, if you follow the advice of Mattheis, and bust your ass during school to find work and make connections, you may well be okay at graduation regardless -- and at least there are a lot of firms in town to make contact with.  But you can't count on getting one through OCI.