Law School Discussion

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« on: August 01, 2008, 12:33:35 PM »
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LittleRussianPrincess, Esq.

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Re: Anyone else feel like they wasted their summer at their post-1L job?
« Reply #1 on: August 01, 2008, 01:11:57 PM »
It's unfortunate that you had a bad experience, but you have to learn to see it in a positive light. Very quickly if you're doing 2L OCI this fall. And even if you aren't, your 1L experience is a spring board to other employment, so even if it wasn't a positive one, you have to learn to spin it, to identify some positive aspects of the experience which you will share with your interviewers. I don't care what you did, there are always, always transferrable skills that you picked up and that you can apply in your next job. I know it's frustrating when things don't work out the way you expected and those responsible for your professional development don't invest the time or don't have the pedagogical skills to provide you with meaningful work, but you have to, you absolutely must spin this!

Re: Anyone else feel like they wasted their summer at their post-1L job?
« Reply #2 on: August 01, 2008, 01:14:44 PM »
I'm not fully in the same boat as you, as I actually have enjoyed my gig and have learned an awful lot. However, the work morphed from IP research and applying patent principles to performing marketing and social research -- the company is launching a new Web concern, and everything else was put on hold so that all R&D hands could work on it. So I haven't gotten nearly as much legal training as I'd like, and I'll be leaving with little written product that I can actually use as samples (hard when 90% of it is confidential).  That's disappointing. BUT 1. You can only push so much and 2. The work is not irrelevant at all (I've been studying the the demographic, linguistic and socioeconomic trends of the BRIC world -- all U.S. lawyers will need to know this stuff in 10 more years, and that puts me ahead of that curve). 

Luckily, I'll be doing an externship, taking Evidence in a simulation format (awesome, but brutal) and writing a ton in my Crim Pro class in the fall. Combined with lots of moot court and (hopefully) a research assistantship, I should more than make up for lost time. And I am parting with what could be a long-term relationship with my company. Straight law or no straight law, that's a good chip to have in the post-Bush economy (especially since my boss invented priceline.com and knows as much about 'Net law and the IP process as anyone in the country).

BTW, try not to succumb to negativity ... easy to do in law, I've learned, because the energy patterns can be so chaotic and the people around you can be so obnoxious. I've fallen into that trap intermittenly myself, and I understand your frustration. However, 1. As long as you're learning and moving forward, you're progressing. 2. Very little in life proceeds according to plan. 4. It's up to you to fight to get where you want ... nobody will hand you your opportunities. and 4. the people interviewing you for jobs ostensibly still like what they  do, and a bad attitude can work against you.   

jd06

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Re: Anyone else feel like they wasted their summer at their post-1L job?
« Reply #3 on: August 01, 2008, 02:10:48 PM »
It is laughable to say I applied anything from law school here.

You learned a valuable lesson and you didn't even realize it.  The practice of law and the study of law are two different animals.  The mantra that "law school teaches you how to think like a lawyer" is true.  There's not a lot of practical application, largely because you spend the majority of your time in law school studying appellate cases and memorizing common law elements of causes of action.  Those of us in practice simply rely (at least for the most part) on the applicable code.  We keep busy trying to flush out facts (which are always given to you in law school.)  I have law clerks try to make fancy policy arguments to me all the time and I tell 'em the court just doesn't have time to hear that crap. 

And the above poster is correct re attitude.  If you really want to stand out in this business show up w/ a positive attitude and certainly don't be presumptuous enough to think you've got it all figured out.  None of us do.