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Author Topic: Northwestern Two-Year Program Admissions  (Read 1144 times)

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Northwestern Two-Year Program Admissions
« on: August 01, 2008, 10:43:04 AM »
Since this is a new program, I don't know if a lot of people will be able to answer this, but I am hoping some of you can offer some insight.  I am planning on applying to NU, and I am curious what are my odds of getting in and, assuming I get in, getting into the two-year program.

My numbers are in my signature and my credentials include extensive part-time work experience, including working about 30 hours a week while pulling 18 hour academic semesters.  I have pretty average soft factors (titled president of business honor society, senator in SGA).

Also, what kind of financial aid should I expect from NU?  I have looked at LSN, and it really seems to vary.  Any help on any of these issues would be very helpful.  Thanks in advance!
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Re: Northwestern Two-Year Program Admissions
« Reply #1 on: August 01, 2008, 11:02:01 AM »
If you're straight from undergrad, I'd say your chances are very, very slim of getting into the 2-year program.
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meggo

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Re: Northwestern Two-Year Program Admissions
« Reply #2 on: August 01, 2008, 12:20:57 PM »
yeah I'm unsure about how NU weights different type of work experience. I have 1.5 - 2 years of full time work experience internationally but it wasn't post-university. I took a break from university when doing this so I'm not sure if they'd look at it as post-grad experience (though it was a proper job). Similarly I'm not sure how they view people who work part time, but it's a 'proper' job and is during school.

I really don't think the two year program though is a good idea if you have the time to do 3 years. As someone mentioned, it seems like NU wants it's entrants to be more like the MBA class, and this program, it seems to me is like an executive MBA and is for those who have a lot of work experience and can give up perhaps doing summer associate work or internships

amassherst

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Re: Northwestern Two-Year Program Admissions
« Reply #3 on: August 03, 2008, 03:55:31 PM »
I'm so curious about the NU 2-yr JD program myself.  My case is more hopeless, though, because I graduated college at around a 3.0, so unless I get a 180, Northwestern shouldn't even be a consideration.  Anyhow, I've been working full-time for 4 years and I'm hoping to start law school in 2010, so that'll be six years of full-time work by the time I'd start, so hopefully that'll be a plus. I'm going to follow the 2-yr program.  I wonder if the career prospects will be the same as for people who do three.  And...no Summer Associateships?  Big disadvantage?

nealric

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Re: Northwestern Two-Year Program Admissions
« Reply #4 on: August 04, 2008, 11:00:28 AM »
IMO it would be a big disadvantage for Biglaw. Many firms won't quite know how to handle you. People at the top will probably be fine, but it will cause problems for those on the bubble.
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Re: Northwestern Two-Year Program Admissions
« Reply #5 on: August 24, 2008, 12:33:12 AM »
While I'm by no means and expert on the 2-year program. I have already been in touch with an admissions officer and an NU Law alumni that does admissions interviews and recrutiting for the school. Here's what I do know:

You will NOT get into the accelerated (2-year) program with part time experience. NU law 3 yr prefers work experience and they will look at PT.the 2 year program requires that it be at least 2 years of full-time work POST graduation. It's not just to get you in and out faster. It's a redesigned course. They are teaching based on a new model. Of course all the regular law classes are the same but it is designed to be more like an executive MBA. They want people that have been managers and had increasing responsibility so they bring a certai perspective to the course on day 1.

There will be an opportunity for a summer internship. While it is true that you will be taking classes in the summer it's the summer prior to fall matriculation. So if you plan on starting in Fall 2009 (the first entering class) you will actually start classes in May. You will join the regular 1L's in August/Sept. whenever school starts.
You will have the opportunity to do OCI after only 1 semester of grades.

They have interviewed countless employers and have found that because of the courseload and the difficulty of the program there is no problem hiring accelerated students.

NU has no desire to set you up for failure. They understand there will be challenges. The payoff is that you go intot he work force 1 year earlier, and you are now prepared to be more business-minded and more practical than what they expect a traditional law student to be.

This course is not for everyone. If you're not into statistics, analytical reasoning, quantitative skill-building and learning about business associations this program is probably not right for you.

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Re: Northwestern Two-Year Program Admissions
« Reply #6 on: September 07, 2008, 11:13:28 AM »
Does anyone know if Northwestern's two-year program will be as generous with scholarships as their regular program?

Also, what type of work experience are they looking for? I was a statistical analyst for a state judicial system and now Iím working in a similar capacity for a criminal justice agency.
Thanks!