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Why am I not progressing with self-study?

*devo*

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Why am I not progressing with self-study?
« on: July 30, 2008, 03:37:28 PM »
I have been preparing on my own for a few months. My initial diagnostic was a 151 on an older prep test (the free one on LSAC, December '96 maybe). I have finished both Bibles and found them very helpful.  I feel much more comfortable with the material and my games have improved a lot.  Still, when it comes to practice tests under timed conditions, I am not seeing the progress. I just took Prep Test A out of Superprep and got a 153. 17 correct in LR and RC. 16 correct in the other LR. 15 correct in Games. Comparing my initial diagnostic with Superprep A, my games improved and my other sections got slightly worse.

Should I take more timed sections and tests?  Go back through the Bibles?  I have been very inconsistent on other prep tests but my highest has been 159 on Prep Test 37 (June '02 I think).  I got that 159 a few weeks ago and decided a class would not help me any more than self study would.  I was hoping today's test would show improvement, but I am now wondering what I can do.  I would prefer to not take the class, but anything to improve.

My goal is AT LEAST a 160.  For whatever it is worth, my SAT was a 1230 (80th percentile) with no prep so the 160 should be feasible.  Any input would be appreciated.

meggo

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Re: Why am I not progressing with self-study?
« Reply #1 on: July 30, 2008, 03:51:55 PM »
I understand it's frustrating to study and not see results but I think the best thing to do is go over your missed answers, make sure you understand the logic behind the wrong answers and make sure you really grasp it. You also have to be prepared that it takes time to see the results of studying in their PT scores. Do you have newer tests? Because you will definately need them. And don't get discouraged. I always get a wee bit nervous scoring my PT's because I want my score to be high, but sometimes it isn't and you just have to pour over your wrong answers and make sure you understand everything. I really believe (well for me anyway) doing PT's, and going over my wrong answers with a fine tooth comb, helped me improve my scores a lot and also built up endurance.

just dot

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Re: Why am I not progressing with self-study?
« Reply #2 on: July 30, 2008, 04:41:24 PM »
I agree that it can take a while to see improvement.  You say you've been studying for a few months, but how intensely?  Every day?  A few times a week?  That makes a difference.  It takes a lot of work and an hour or two here or there won't cut it.  Simply reading the Bibles isn't enough if you don't practice the methods.  A lot of people have mentioned that they actually see their scores drop after first using the methods, but with practice they quickly come up. 

I also completely agree with meggo that you have to understand your misses.  Just blowing through PTs isn't enough.  You need to spend a lot of time studying each miss (or guess, mark those, too!) and understand why the correct answer is correct. 

Keep working.  You'll get there!  The LSAT isn't an easy test.

Re: Why am I not progressing with self-study?
« Reply #3 on: July 30, 2008, 10:06:20 PM »
i've also been doing a lot (a lot!) of self-study for a few months now.  i try to study everyday for 2-4 hours a day. 

the first few months were really rough for me, and i didn't do well on any of my practice test. however, a few weeks ago, i started noticing a lot of improvement,and the improvement came after i altered my "thinking."  i started really focusing in on the "lsat mindset." i agree with the prior post; it's not enough to simply go through the materials---you have to really dig in.

but it seems that you are very dedicated; i'm sure you'll figure out your own way and improve.

good luck!!!




oh, are you taking the test in october? how many months do you have lest to study?

*devo*

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Re: Why am I not progressing with self-study?
« Reply #4 on: July 30, 2008, 11:52:43 PM »
Thanks to everyone who replied. To answer a few of the questions about my study habits, I have been studying intensely for the last two weeks, but the month and a half before that was a few hours here and there, with extra emphasis on the games.  As I write this I realize I have not been as dedicated as I could have been, but I have been working full-time so any LSAT prep has felt like a lot.

I have all the LSAT prep tests but have been saving the more recent tests.  I will definitely practice untimed and try to increase my accuracy.

Julie Fern

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Re: Why am I not progressing with self-study?
« Reply #5 on: July 31, 2008, 05:50:13 AM »
You need to work through at least 20 prep tests to really gain any mastery, preferably 25-30. Start out untimed, and increase your speed only gradually. Don't start speeding up until you can achieve your desired score untimed. (No real point otherwise.) Practice the bible techniques as you go, and feel free to reference the bibles as you work through the exams. Take breaks whenever you need them, and spend as long as you want on each exam (a week if necessary). The important thing is that you're thinking through all the questions very carefully and thoughtfully.

As time passes, you'll start to be able to move more quickly, for longer periods of time. At the end, you'll be doing full-length, formally timed exams. (Make sure you add in a 5th section for practice.)

After each test, review the questions you missed or guessed on carefully -- this is where improvement comes from. make sure you understand why the right answer is right, and your choice was not. If you need help on a Q, come here, or find some other resource.

keep in mind this dude total idiot.

Julie Fern

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Re: Why am I not progressing with self-study?
« Reply #6 on: July 31, 2008, 05:51:58 AM »
Thanks to everyone who replied. To answer a few of the questions about my study habits, I have been studying intensely for the last two weeks, but the month and a half before that was a few hours here and there, with extra emphasis on the games. As I write this I realize I have not been as dedicated as I could have been, but I have been working full-time so any LSAT prep has felt like a lot.

I have all the LSAT prep tests but have been saving the more recent tests. I will definitely practice untimed and try to increase my accuracy.

Also remember that the LSAT should be your #1 priority when prepping. Even if you're working full time, that means 70 hours a week when you're not working or sleeping. And as long as you prep 3-4 days a week, a couple/few hours at a time, you should be fine.

Think of it as prepping for a prize worth $150,000, if that helps. Because it's worth at least that much in terms of scholarship money and/or future earnings.

told ya.

Re: Why am I not progressing with self-study?
« Reply #7 on: July 31, 2008, 09:25:00 AM »
no, Lindbergh is an expert in everything.  especially affirmative action.  duh.

Julie Fern

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Re: Why am I not progressing with self-study?
« Reply #8 on: July 31, 2008, 12:42:41 PM »
julie think know what really tingling.  get hands off danger zone.

Julie Fern

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Re: Why am I not progressing with self-study?
« Reply #9 on: July 31, 2008, 02:37:56 PM »
You need to work through at least 20 prep tests to really gain any mastery, preferably 25-30. Start out untimed, and increase your speed only gradually. Don't start speeding up until you can achieve your desired score untimed. (No real point otherwise.) Practice the bible techniques as you go, and feel free to reference the bibles as you work through the exams. Take breaks whenever you need them, and spend as long as you want on each exam (a week if necessary). The important thing is that you're thinking through all the questions very carefully and thoughtfully.

As time passes, you'll start to be able to move more quickly, for longer periods of time. At the end, you'll be doing full-length, formally timed exams. (Make sure you add in a 5th section for practice.)

After each test, review the questions you missed or guessed on carefully -- this is where improvement comes from. make sure you understand why the right answer is right, and your choice was not. If you need help on a Q, come here, or find some other resource.

keep in mind this dude total idiot.

Keep in mind this person's functionally retarded, and has never taken the LSAT.

you know nothing about julie, except she know more about lsat than you.

that gotta hurt.