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Author Topic: book totin' question  (Read 7235 times)

Ender Wiggin

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Re: book totin' question
« Reply #30 on: July 21, 2008, 08:17:10 PM »
I too had no interest in the rolly bag. . . that is until my husband, a physical therapist, threatened to stop giving me back rubs unless I got one.  I decided the back pain just wasn't worth it. 

Please tell me you're not actually considering that.  I would sooner make multiple trips, carrying one book on each.

LSN


Michigan Law Class of 2011

MiamiHurricane

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Re: book totin' question
« Reply #31 on: July 21, 2008, 09:14:06 PM »
I too had no interest in the rolly bag. . . that is until my husband, a physical therapist, threatened to stop giving me back rubs unless I got one.  I decided the back pain just wasn't worth it. 

Please tell me you're not actually considering that.  I would sooner make multiple trips, carrying one book on each.

Actually, I've graduated and am studying for the bar, so yes, I used the rolly bag. 

skeeball

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Re: book totin' question
« Reply #32 on: July 21, 2008, 09:38:45 PM »
One girl in my section actually carried her stuff around in a rolling suitcase.

My Brenthaven bag was the only one I saw that had a big enough laptop compartment AND plenty of room for casebooks. It's not the prettiest bag, but it's been great for me.

almostlegal

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Re: book totin' question
« Reply #33 on: July 21, 2008, 10:12:05 PM »
I got this bag and used it in Europe, and it was horribly painful, so I think I'll use it in law school too (was the reason I bought a bag with a laptop compartment in the first place):

http://www.dakine.com/street-series/guys/packs/campus-lg/

... or something similar.  disc, they have some patterns that aren't horrible..?  I could see you rocking maybe the red plaid one, or if you get the wheeled version there is a brown plaid.

We shall scour the internet and find you something practical and yet dischord-y.

Random, I'm confused by the bolded.  Although, you know, law school IS all about masochism  ;)

I think I could do this, I'd feel like I was on Safari:
http://www.dakine.com/street-series/guys/packs/outpost/

Yeah, I've been looking on Etsy, and while I've found some stuff that LOOKS awesome, none of it looks ergonomically sound. 


If you go to www.zappos.com, you can search for backpacks by material and color.  They also have user reviews.

kolya

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Re: book totin' question
« Reply #34 on: July 21, 2008, 11:33:12 PM »
I just left my books at a locker (and later a journal office) every day.  It helped me get work done more efficiently to be forced to do it at school; if I ever had to take books home, it was never more than one at a time, which isn't bad at all.  I'd recommend that to anyone who has the chance.  Another plus is you never have to worry about leaving one at home, because they're always on campus.

Plus, it is a physical impossibility to look professional with a rolling backpack.

In doing this were you usually able to make it home in time for dinner? (I'm serious -- I really don't want to have to eat out/on campus because of $$).

And re: the bolded . . . I'm not really concerned with looking "professional" or not, but is there anything remotely practical that doesn't look so hopelessly dorky?  I mean, no offense, guys, your taste is your taste.  But I myself am not too happy about having to rock a padded camping backpack with a million straps, and I'd rather die than have a rolling backpack.  I've had my eye on some large satchel-type bags and stuff, but I don't think that's going to work unless I'm okay with weekly appointments with a chiropractor starting at age 25 . . .

Seriously, leave it all at school. If you can compartmentalize your life (school gets this many hours with no interruption, then you go home and do what you want) you will have much more free time to take advantage of, instead of squandered time.  I suggest finding a good place at school you can work at, and staying 'til you're done.  You might have a couple late nights, but there's no avoiding that any way you look at it.  I was able to make it home for dinner and cook for myself pretty much all the time.  If I thought it might go late, I brought a sandwich and maybe a banana.  Instant oatmeal packets are also your best friend.  I never bring more than one book anywhere; usually all I have is a spiral notebook, some pens and a couple highlighters.  The wonderfulness of this approach cannot be overstated, especially as you watch your sweaty friends lumber in late to class and try to squeak by the professor with four law books on their backs.

MaxtoneFour

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Re: book totin' question
« Reply #35 on: July 21, 2008, 11:39:01 PM »
Here's a good lifting program if you're interested.


http://www.defrancostraining.com/articles/archive/articles_westside.htm

It works. I'm deadlifting 300+ lbs. at 160 (ectomorph build).
East 1999 is where you'll find me.

2L at Vanderbilt University Law School (Class of 2010)

dischord

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Re: book totin' question
« Reply #36 on: July 21, 2008, 11:46:35 PM »
I just left my books at a locker (and later a journal office) every day.  It helped me get work done more efficiently to be forced to do it at school; if I ever had to take books home, it was never more than one at a time, which isn't bad at all.  I'd recommend that to anyone who has the chance.  Another plus is you never have to worry about leaving one at home, because they're always on campus.

Plus, it is a physical impossibility to look professional with a rolling backpack.

In doing this were you usually able to make it home in time for dinner? (I'm serious -- I really don't want to have to eat out/on campus because of $$).

And re: the bolded . . . I'm not really concerned with looking "professional" or not, but is there anything remotely practical that doesn't look so hopelessly dorky?  I mean, no offense, guys, your taste is your taste.  But I myself am not too happy about having to rock a padded camping backpack with a million straps, and I'd rather die than have a rolling backpack.  I've had my eye on some large satchel-type bags and stuff, but I don't think that's going to work unless I'm okay with weekly appointments with a chiropractor starting at age 25 . . .

Seriously, leave it all at school. If you can compartmentalize your life (school gets this many hours with no interruption, then you go home and do what you want) you will have much more free time to take advantage of, instead of squandered time.  I suggest finding a good place at school you can work at, and staying 'til you're done.  You might have a couple late nights, but there's no avoiding that any way you look at it.  I was able to make it home for dinner and cook for myself pretty much all the time.  If I thought it might go late, I brought a sandwich and maybe a banana.  Instant oatmeal packets are also your best friend.  I never bring more than one book anywhere; usually all I have is a spiral notebook, some pens and a couple highlighters.  The wonderfulness of this approach cannot be overstated, especially as you watch your sweaty friends lumber in late to class and try to squeak by the professor with four law books on their backs.

Dude.  This is SO my plan.  There are many things in this post that indicate that you and I think alike.

Do you live super close to school?  I'm going to have a bit of a commute, but not TOO much walking I don't think.

Anyway, you are now my law school logistics guru.



I think I could do this, I'd feel like I was on Safari:
http://www.dakine.com/street-series/guys/packs/outpost/

I'm so confused by your aesthetic sensibilities.


I'm kind of into this one: http://www.brenthaven.com/catalog-expandable-trek-titanium.html

It's expandable, so big enough for everything when needed, but not permanently ginormous to make you look like an ant carrying a nibble of sandwich back to the queen. I'd get the orange, of course.

And I by yours.  My selection isn't my dream bag, but still, to each his own, I suppose.




At least I can f-ing think.

jacy85

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Re: book totin' question
« Reply #37 on: July 22, 2008, 07:53:27 AM »

Seriously, leave it all at school. If you can compartmentalize your life (school gets this many hours with no interruption, then you go home and do what you want) you will have much more free time to take advantage of, instead of squandered time.  I suggest finding a good place at school you can work at, and staying 'til you're done.  You might have a couple late nights, but there's no avoiding that any way you look at it.  I was able to make it home for dinner and cook for myself pretty much all the time.  If I thought it might go late, I brought a sandwich and maybe a banana.  Instant oatmeal packets are also your best friend.  I never bring more than one book anywhere; usually all I have is a spiral notebook, some pens and a couple highlighters.  The wonderfulness of this approach cannot be overstated, especially as you watch your sweaty friends lumber in late to class and try to squeak by the professor with four law books on their backs.

People I know who worked at school a lot found the compartmentalization very difficult simply because they weren't productive at school.  The library can be a horrifically distracting place, with classmates wandering around, talking/chatting, etc.

If this is really the plan, then you need to stake out the library ASAP when you start.  Look for the quietest corners; look and see if there's an undergrad library near by, etc.

kolya

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Re: book totin' question
« Reply #38 on: July 22, 2008, 08:00:34 AM »
I just left my books at a locker (and later a journal office) every day.  It helped me get work done more efficiently to be forced to do it at school; if I ever had to take books home, it was never more than one at a time, which isn't bad at all.  I'd recommend that to anyone who has the chance.  Another plus is you never have to worry about leaving one at home, because they're always on campus.

Plus, it is a physical impossibility to look professional with a rolling backpack.

In doing this were you usually able to make it home in time for dinner? (I'm serious -- I really don't want to have to eat out/on campus because of $$).

And re: the bolded . . . I'm not really concerned with looking "professional" or not, but is there anything remotely practical that doesn't look so hopelessly dorky?  I mean, no offense, guys, your taste is your taste.  But I myself am not too happy about having to rock a padded camping backpack with a million straps, and I'd rather die than have a rolling backpack.  I've had my eye on some large satchel-type bags and stuff, but I don't think that's going to work unless I'm okay with weekly appointments with a chiropractor starting at age 25 . . .

Seriously, leave it all at school. If you can compartmentalize your life (school gets this many hours with no interruption, then you go home and do what you want) you will have much more free time to take advantage of, instead of squandered time.  I suggest finding a good place at school you can work at, and staying 'til you're done.  You might have a couple late nights, but there's no avoiding that any way you look at it.  I was able to make it home for dinner and cook for myself pretty much all the time.  If I thought it might go late, I brought a sandwich and maybe a banana.  Instant oatmeal packets are also your best friend.  I never bring more than one book anywhere; usually all I have is a spiral notebook, some pens and a couple highlighters.  The wonderfulness of this approach cannot be overstated, especially as you watch your sweaty friends lumber in late to class and try to squeak by the professor with four law books on their backs.

Dude.  This is SO my plan.  There are many things in this post that indicate that you and I think alike.

Do you live super close to school?  I'm going to have a bit of a commute, but not TOO much walking I don't think.

Anyway, you are now my law school logistics guru.

It's good to be appreciated.

I don't live super-close, but I commute by bike.  It's 25 minutes to school by metro, 15 by bike.  There are a couple hills, so that's why I'm super careful about keeping carrying weight down.  It sucks having to struggle up those things with a full pack.

kolya

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Re: book totin' question
« Reply #39 on: July 22, 2008, 08:02:14 AM »

Seriously, leave it all at school. If you can compartmentalize your life (school gets this many hours with no interruption, then you go home and do what you want) you will have much more free time to take advantage of, instead of squandered time.  I suggest finding a good place at school you can work at, and staying 'til you're done.  You might have a couple late nights, but there's no avoiding that any way you look at it.  I was able to make it home for dinner and cook for myself pretty much all the time.  If I thought it might go late, I brought a sandwich and maybe a banana.  Instant oatmeal packets are also your best friend.  I never bring more than one book anywhere; usually all I have is a spiral notebook, some pens and a couple highlighters.  The wonderfulness of this approach cannot be overstated, especially as you watch your sweaty friends lumber in late to class and try to squeak by the professor with four law books on their backs.

People I know who worked at school a lot found the compartmentalization very difficult simply because they weren't productive at school.  The library can be a horrifically distracting place, with classmates wandering around, talking/chatting, etc.

If this is really the plan, then you need to stake out the library ASAP when you start.  Look for the quietest corners; look and see if there's an undergrad library near by, etc.

Distracting?  I think that if you talk in our library you will be shot.  It hasn't been an issue.  I presume most libraries have quiet spaces?