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Author Topic: One Year of Prep/Where should I start?  (Read 2110 times)

BrentZ10

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One Year of Prep/Where should I start?
« on: July 18, 2008, 06:39:10 PM »
I'm a junior and planning on taking the LSAT next June. I've really just started looking into what I need to do to prep for the exam. My dad got me the PR Cracking the LSATs book a few months ago and I've looked over it briefly but I still haven't started anything in depth. What would be people's recommendations as far as where to start and a system to follow over the next year to be as prepared as possible.

Should I start with books? Taking a preptest? Time or untimed? Any help people have would be greatly appreciated.

And I also realize all this has probably been discussed before so I apologize about that.

PaleForce

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Re: One Year of Prep/Where should I start?
« Reply #1 on: July 18, 2008, 10:04:37 PM »
cliff, chill out.  The OP probably just wants info specific to his situation.  And, most posters have started threads that are intended to answer questions that have already been beaten to death.

Anyway, to the OP: if I were you, I'd take a timed practice test, just to get a baseline.  The LSAC has one on their website that you can print. ( http://www.lsat.org/pdfs/2007-2008/SamplePTJune07.pdf )  Take it as close to test conditions as possible.  A quieter  floor of the public library (rustling papers, but no talking) would work well.  This should give you an idea of how much independent prep you'll need or whether you'd benefit from a class.  Good luck!

FatUncle

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Re: One Year of Prep/Where should I start?
« Reply #2 on: July 18, 2008, 10:50:16 PM »
Start by not starting for six months.

snickersnicker

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Re: One Year of Prep/Where should I start?
« Reply #3 on: July 18, 2008, 11:24:34 PM »
Start out by not taking FatUncle's advice. I'm going to be a junior next year and have been studying since last October and it has made a world of difference. Personally, this is how I would do things:

Take an untimed LSAT just to get a feel for the questions. Answer every question, and once you're done, see why you got the incorrect ones wrong. My pre-law department had a booklet of the June 96 LSAT (one of LSAC's free ones) which had explanations for each question after the exam itself. If you can't find a copy, pick up the LSAT SuperPrep, which has three full LSATs with explanations as well as some tips for how to do each section at the beginning. Don't get bummed if the first exam in SuperPrep trips you up; it's got a pretty rough scale and is all around pretty difficult.

Once you've got a feel for the question types, take a timed LSAT in realistic circumstances, like PaleForce suggested. That should give you an idea of how the test works under timed conditions. From there, I would take a couple more timed tests to see what kind of trends show up. You might find you're weak in logic games, or in one of the other sections. If it ends up being LG (which gives most people problems), pick up Powerscore's Logic Games Bible. Actually, you should pick that up unless you're scoring super-well on LG. If LR is giving you the most trouble, Powerscore has an LR Bible which is supposed to be great as well (I've never used it). I can't give any recommendations for reading comprehension, but I'm sure some people here can. Work through whatever books you need to, and take prep tests from the LSAT collection books that LSAC put out. Closer to your test date, buy the more recently released LSATs and take those.

If you want more tips, feel free to PM me. I'm a huge proponent of taking as much time as possible to prep for the LSAT and have a systematic (and wildly neurotic) method for analysing your results and so on.
LSAT: 166 (:()
UGPA: 4
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BrentZ10

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Re: One Year of Prep/Where should I start?
« Reply #4 on: July 18, 2008, 11:48:12 PM »
Magic 8-ball says Reading comp is going to be a problem for you.  Forget to read the sticky threads or was it going to be too much of a hassle to spend 5 minutes doing that?

Very constructive and helpful. Thanks.

To the others, thanks for the input. I appreciate it. I was looking for what I need to do to get started and you guys really helped out, thanks!

AspenLizzy

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Re: One Year of Prep/Where should I start?
« Reply #5 on: July 19, 2008, 12:00:02 AM »
Keep in mind there are different schools of thought in LSAT prep.  I love the powerscore series, but the TestMasters weekend course I took was also good.  the only problem was the systems weren't compatable.  Pick one and stick with it.  I did a year of prep too in 2005 and it still pays off daily.

BrentZ10

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Re: One Year of Prep/Where should I start?
« Reply #6 on: July 19, 2008, 09:27:52 AM »
cliff, chill out.  The OP probably just wants info specific to his situation.  And, most posters have started threads that are intended to answer questions that have already been beaten to death.

Anyway, to the OP: if I were you, I'd take a timed practice test, just to get a baseline.  The LSAC has one on their website that you can print. ( http://www.lsat.org/pdfs/2007-2008/SamplePTJune07.pdf )  Take it as close to test conditions as possible.  A quieter  floor of the public library (rustling papers, but no talking) would work well.  This should give you an idea of how much independent prep you'll need or whether you'd benefit from a class.  Good luck!
Hey, I am chill, and its not like 3 of the 6 sticky threads AT THE TOP of the board index (they are stickied so they stay at the top FOR A REASON, Earlcat did a fine job with that) don't cover SOOOOOOO much of the important basics.  Not trying to be a d!ck, just providing straight up harsh reality, anybody that does not take a few minutes to read a few things and do a little research and THINK, especially with things that are RIGHT in FRONT OF THEIR face and well organized WILL NOT perform well on the LSAT, WILL NOT GET ACCEPTED to a good LS, and God forbid if such a person manages to get into A LS (why am I thinking Cooley?), they will fail miserably unless they get their act together and realize that this entire process REQUIRES doing a LOT of READING, RESEARCH and THINKING.  This process is not easy boys and girls and it requires a LOT of work!  So there it is, if someone can't handle that and wants to just look for some easy quick fix/magic bullet to make it easy and to avoid the work and wants other people to do the very BASIC work for them, they should SERIOUSLY reconsider trying to become a lawyer.  Yeah, it sucks I know, but hey, I didn't create the system, but it is what it is.  Call this some tough love from Cliffy.

And case in point, user Tracy T came off as lazy and such with her first few posts, I nailed her on it and she quickly woke up or whatever and with her subsequent posts has demonstrated that she is putting in the work and seems to show that she has what it takes to deal with all this and is somebody that will likely succeed and excel in the process and she also demonstrates a decent sense of humor as well.  Learn from it people, or just go to the movies with friends and complain that life is not fair and that you got screwed by the man.  Your choice.


I really appreciate your concern but I'm not that worried about the possible correllation between how hard I work on internet forum and how my LSAT score and success in law school is going to be. But just so you feel better, I actually did read the stickied threads, which I found were helpful but didn't answer what I was really looking for and were fairly cluttered. And it would seem what I did would be a useful skill in law school. Using the resources around me, aka this board and its members.

Again to the others, I appreciate your answers. All I wanted were a few perspectives on where I should get started.

FatUncle

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Re: One Year of Prep/Where should I start?
« Reply #7 on: July 19, 2008, 11:36:55 AM »
Start out by not taking FatUncle's advice. I'm going to be a junior next year and have been studying since last October and it has made a world of difference.

Wow.  I guess someone who has wasted so much of their time would have to believe that it's been worthwhile.  I wish I had more information about you so I could be sure to never hire you if and when you become an attorney.  It would be terribly unfortunate to wind up with the lawyer who would bill me 300 hours for work that could have been done in 80. 

Matthies

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Re: One Year of Prep/Where should I start?
« Reply #8 on: July 19, 2008, 12:16:19 PM »
Start out by not taking FatUncle's advice. I'm going to be a junior next year and have been studying since last October and it has made a world of difference.

Wow.  I guess someone who has wasted so much of their time would have to believe that it's been worthwhile.  I wish I had more information about you so I could be sure to never hire you if and when you become an attorney.  It would be terribly unfortunate to wind up with the lawyer who would bill me 300 hours for work that could have been done in 80. 

You've not worked in a law firm yet have you? Thats the whole point
*In clinical studies, Matthies was well tolerated, but women who are pregnant, nursing or might become pregnant should not take or handle Matthies due to a rare, but serious side effect called him having to make child support payments.

BrentZ10

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Re: One Year of Prep/Where should I start?
« Reply #9 on: July 19, 2008, 01:40:21 PM »
cliff, chill out.  The OP probably just wants info specific to his situation.  And, most posters have started threads that are intended to answer questions that have already been beaten to death.

Anyway, to the OP: if I were you, I'd take a timed practice test, just to get a baseline.  The LSAC has one on their website that you can print. ( http://www.lsat.org/pdfs/2007-2008/SamplePTJune07.pdf )  Take it as close to test conditions as possible.  A quieter  floor of the public library (rustling papers, but no talking) would work well.  This should give you an idea of how much independent prep you'll need or whether you'd benefit from a class.  Good luck!
Hey, I am chill, and its not like 3 of the 6 sticky threads AT THE TOP of the board index (they are stickied so they stay at the top FOR A REASON, Earlcat did a fine job with that) don't cover SOOOOOOO much of the important basics.  Not trying to be a d!ck, just providing straight up harsh reality, anybody that does not take a few minutes to read a few things and do a little research and THINK, especially with things that are RIGHT in FRONT OF THEIR face and well organized WILL NOT perform well on the LSAT, WILL NOT GET ACCEPTED to a good LS, and God forbid if such a person manages to get into A LS (why am I thinking Cooley?), they will fail miserably unless they get their act together and realize that this entire process REQUIRES doing a LOT of READING, RESEARCH and THINKING.  This process is not easy boys and girls and it requires a LOT of work!  So there it is, if someone can't handle that and wants to just look for some easy quick fix/magic bullet to make it easy and to avoid the work and wants other people to do the very BASIC work for them, they should SERIOUSLY reconsider trying to become a lawyer.  Yeah, it sucks I know, but hey, I didn't create the system, but it is what it is.  Call this some tough love from Cliffy.

And case in point, user Tracy T came off as lazy and such with her first few posts, I nailed her on it and she quickly woke up or whatever and with her subsequent posts has demonstrated that she is putting in the work and seems to show that she has what it takes to deal with all this and is somebody that will likely succeed and excel in the process and she also demonstrates a decent sense of humor as well.  Learn from it people, or just go to the movies with friends and complain that life is not fair and that you got screwed by the man.  Your choice.


I really appreciate your concern but I'm not that worried about the possible correllation between how hard I work on internet forum and how my LSAT score and success in law school is going to be. But just so you feel better, I actually did read the stickied threads, which I found were helpful but didn't answer what I was really looking for and were fairly cluttered. And it would seem what I did would be a useful skill in law school. Using the resources around me, aka this board and its members.

Again to the others, I appreciate your answers. All I wanted were a few perspectives on where I should get started.
Ok, you have caught me in rare form in this thread and I will make some rational sense before I get back to talking nonsense with obscure references and trying to get Julie Fern into bed as well as insulting lazy day dreamers.
Pardon me if some of this seems insulting or condescending.  Get used to that if you are going to carry through with getting into LS and becoming a lawyer.
You asked a super basic set of questions on a discussion forum therefore seeking advice from the peanut gallery of strangers about stuff that, YES, is largely addressed in the sticky threads.
Should I start with books? Taking a preptest? Time or untimed? Any help people have would be greatly appreciated.
It's really nice that you could use the word correlation and are not concerned with how much work you put into using the resources of one that is FILLED with experts while also seeking out very simple basic information from one in which the information is right in front of your face.  If you are not inclined to browse the threads and sort through the clutter and just want to make a few posts with silly general questions and get somebody to give you some magic silver bullet for free without doing some research on your own and exercising some judgment, you are sadly conflicted and looking for some stranger to do the basic required work for you for free.
If you want somebody to hold your hand and tell you what to do and exactly how to do it without you having to put in some leg work to figure it out, PAY somebody or some organization that is qualified and DO WHAT THEY TELL YOU TO DO.
Otherwise, spend some time browsing and reading some stuff on this free publicly available forum to collect information and educate yourself and try to have some fun and a sense of humor about it and learn to sort through all of what it contains with the fun and games and all.
FYI, Earlcat, the global moderator here who has taught LSAT classes for TPR for a while (and got a 179 on the June test after taking it again before he starts LS next month) busts his ass to help people out on this forum with posts, moderation, stickies and all that.  He himself strongly recommends staying away from the 'cracking the LSAT' book.  It has been referred to as LSAT crack by many people and you got it a while ago and admitted that you have only perused it briefly and have not looked into anything in depth, yet you ask for a comprehensive plan from anonymous people on a discussion board. 
If you want it all dished up on a silver platter cough up the cash and take a good course or get a good tutor, otherwise, get used to doing some independent research and sorting through all the accompanying BS and clutter. 
You getting the main points?  That skill might do you some good with the RC section. 
To get started you READ a lot of stuff and do a LOT of research and check things out and don't ask anonymous strangers to do all that work for you for free. 

Now I am going to hope that Julie Fern wakes up soon so I can continue to try to get her into bed.  Julie is the light of my life and puts fire in my loins!  Come hither honey! 


Honestly, if its that big of a deal, just ignore my question and thread and move on. No need to make a big deal of it.