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Author Topic: Commercial Outlines  (Read 1255 times)

jenzchenz

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Commercial Outlines
« on: July 18, 2008, 04:43:39 PM »
Would you recommend Emanuel's or Gilbert's? I'm just looking for general 1L class outlines so let me know what you recommend for the core classes! Thanks.

BoredAtWork2112

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Re: Commercial Outlines
« Reply #1 on: July 18, 2008, 06:39:51 PM »
If you are determined to use a commercial outline, you must get one that matches the textbook you're using.  If there is both a Gilbert's and an Emanuel's matching, you need to decide on a class-by-class basis--some of the Gilbert's are better than some of the Emanuel's.

That said, don't use a commercial outline.  Use a student outline from a previous class.  Read the E&E, Read Getting To Maybe, and go to class.  Actually read the cases.  You'll do much better that way.

jenzchenz

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Re: Commercial Outlines
« Reply #2 on: July 18, 2008, 07:10:28 PM »
Oh I was planning on reading the cases -- I've just heard that it's good to supplement that with a commercial outline.

BoredAtWork2112

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Re: Commercial Outlines
« Reply #3 on: July 18, 2008, 07:18:34 PM »
In my experience (top 10% at NYU), they're not that useful.  The broad strokes are all contained in the relevant E&E and the details will vary depending on your particular class.  The only real use for them is in using them as the basis for your eventual outline, but a student outline serves that purpose much better. 

jsb221

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Re: Commercial Outlines
« Reply #4 on: July 19, 2008, 11:07:27 AM »
I found some of the E&Es helpful but not all. Definitely think Glannon's Torts and Civ Pro were great. I agree that the best thing, other than preparing your own outline, is to make friends with a 2L or 3L who had the same prof then supplement your outline with theirs. Commercial outlines can be good for this too, but just not as good. I also agree with getting something keyed to your casebook or at least written by the same author (ex. Dukeminier is popular casebook among Property profs and he also authored several study guides). Its important to find what works best for you. That's why I recommend trying a few different ones out (there's a zillion out there besides Gilbert and Emanuel, such as Blonds, the Lexis Understanding Series, Crunchtime, Law in a Flash, which is especially good for short hypos, Q&A series or Exam Pro (good for exam prep) and for briefs the High Court Case Summaries or Casenote or Legalines series. And that's just the tip of the iceberg. ;)

jacy85

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Re: Commercial Outlines
« Reply #5 on: July 19, 2008, 01:34:33 PM »
In my experience (top 10% at NYU), they're not that useful.  The broad strokes are all contained in the relevant E&E and the details will vary depending on your particular class.  The only real use for them is in using them as the basis for your eventual outline, but a student outline serves that purpose much better. 

Agreed (and also w/ this poster's earlier response).  You are MUCH better off with an old outline from a student who took the class in the last couple of years.

Wait a few weeks into the class to see if you want/need a commercial outline.  If you do want to use them, see if your school's library has any.  If so, sit down and flip through one of each (or do this at the bookstore); it's especially helpful to look at a subject you've already covered in class.  The few times I used a commercial outline (and note that this was hardly ever), I didn't constantly prefer gilberts or emmanual.  It depended on the subject.  So you might like one more than the other for torts, but choose the other one for a different subject.