Law School Discussion

reading comp advice...

reading comp advice...
« on: July 07, 2008, 08:50:17 AM »
so i made almost all of my mistakes on the june lsat on reading comp.

i missed 9 RC, 2 arguments, and no logic games.

when i was taking my practice tests, i was only missing 0 to 2 on reading comp but it's clearly gotten a lot harder in recent years.  i was lulled into a false sense of security, i think, and didn't focus on reading comp when i studied.

my question is: because the reading comp has only increased in difficulty *recently*, there are only so many practice tests i'll have that will give me a good idea of how hard the passages have gotten.  do any other companies (princeton, kaplan, etc) have "imitation" passages that people have found to be good indicators of success for the reading comp section on the lsat?  because clearly a practice test from 2002 just isn't gonna cut it...

thanks, guys.  :)

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Re: reading comp advice...
« Reply #1 on: July 07, 2008, 08:55:07 AM »
Prep Test 40 (June 2003), LSAC, ISBN
   Price ranges from $3.00 used to $8.00 new

Prep Test 41 (October 2003), LSAC, ISBN: 0942639820
   Price ranges from $3.00 used to $8.00 new

Prep Test 42 (December 2003), LSAC, ISBN: 0942639839
   Price ranges from $3.00 used to $8.00 new

Prep Test 43 (June 2004), LSAC, ISBN: 0942639944
   Price ranges from $3.00 used to $8.00 new

Prep Test 44 (October 2004) LSAC, ISBN: 0942639952
   Price ranges from $3.00 used to $8.00 new

Prep Test 45 (December 2004), LSAC, ISBN: 0942639979
Price ranges from $3.00 used to $8.00 new

Prep Test 46 (June 2005), LSAC, ISBN: 0976024527
   Price ranges from $3.00 used to $8.00 new

Prep Test 47 (October 2005), LSAC, ISBN: 0976024535
         Price ranges from $3.00 used to $8.00 new

Prep Test 48 (December 2005), LSAC (Available January 2006)
   Price ranges from $3.00 used to $8.00 new


Also, I would rec. a class if needed. www.powerscore.com

Hope this helps! 8)


Re: reading comp advice...
« Reply #2 on: July 07, 2008, 09:02:28 AM »
Prep Test 40 (June 2003), LSAC, ISBN
   Price ranges from $3.00 used to $8.00 new

Prep Test 41 (October 2003), LSAC, ISBN: 0942639820
   Price ranges from $3.00 used to $8.00 new

Prep Test 42 (December 2003), LSAC, ISBN: 0942639839
   Price ranges from $3.00 used to $8.00 new

Prep Test 43 (June 2004), LSAC, ISBN: 0942639944
   Price ranges from $3.00 used to $8.00 new

Prep Test 44 (October 2004) LSAC, ISBN: 0942639952
   Price ranges from $3.00 used to $8.00 new

Prep Test 45 (December 2004), LSAC, ISBN: 0942639979
Price ranges from $3.00 used to $8.00 new

Prep Test 46 (June 2005), LSAC, ISBN: 0976024527
   Price ranges from $3.00 used to $8.00 new

Prep Test 47 (October 2005), LSAC, ISBN: 0976024535
         Price ranges from $3.00 used to $8.00 new

Prep Test 48 (December 2005), LSAC (Available January 2006)
   Price ranges from $3.00 used to $8.00 new


Also, I would rec. a class if needed. www.powerscore.com

Hope this helps! 8)



yeah, bought those at the harvard coop over the weekend.  :)  i was sort of hoping to find some other material, though, because i'll rip through those in about two weeks...

thanks though :)

Re: reading comp advice...
« Reply #3 on: July 07, 2008, 09:03:23 AM »
I took Powerscore and there was VERY little time dedicated to RC tips and tricks, so I would not recommend dropping $1100 just for that.

The most important tip I've received with the new RC is to treat every question like a Must Be True. Be able to defend your answer to the death with proof from the passage, especially with the inference questions.

huh.  that's a good tip.  thanks!

and i'm wary of classes like kaplan, powerscore, etc...i'm REALLY lucky that my parents are willing to help me pay for a tutor.  :)

Re: reading comp advice...
« Reply #4 on: July 07, 2008, 02:29:58 PM »
The RC sections are not so much harder now than they were in 2003 to render older RC sections useless as practice.  Maybe you just went into the section in the wrong state of mind and bombed as a result.  I had practice tests like that while studying for the LSAT; I just wasn't really paying attention, was distracted, or missed the big picture in one of the passages and tanked as a result.  Have you gone back and done the June 2008 section again?  I don't think it was mind blowing; I'd take that over riddled basins of attraction (or whatever the heck that passage was) from some time a few years ago).

Re: reading comp advice...
« Reply #5 on: July 07, 2008, 04:07:49 PM »
Someone observed elsewhere that the RC in recent years has become more like LR.  Some of the June questions reminded me of parallel reasoning questions.  They tend to be more time-consuming, require more frequent reference to the passage, and address the author's form of argument.  (The exception is the comparative section, which is all about the 'gotcha' answers.  I hate comparative.  >:() There aren't as many questions you can answer without going back to the passage.  That means you have to be comfortable reading the passage quickly and moving on to the questions.  Spending four-five minutes reading the passage carefully just isn't feasible (unless you have an eidetic memory.)

The other problem is that the passages just keep getting more dense.  During the test, I never quite figured out what the groupthink passage was talking about.   ::)  I understood the components, but it never quite came together for me.  But that didn't matter, because the questions were all tied to specific paragraphs or sentences, so I didn't need a clear sense of the whole passage.  I answered the main point question via POE.  (Though I did get a question wrong on that passage, so maybe I should shut up.)

I think the old saying about reading The Economist to prep for RC may no longer apply, because the passages have become much more complex than that magazine.  We need to come up with a source of more challenging reading material. Biology textbooks?  Hardcore philosophy?  Law review articles?  Regardless, focusing on writing intended for a broad audience is no longer sufficient.  Dense writing - one might even go so far as to say bad, or at least unclear writing - is what we need to focus on. 

As always, entirely IMHO...

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Re: reading comp advice...
« Reply #6 on: July 07, 2008, 04:17:27 PM »
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Re: reading comp advice...
« Reply #7 on: July 07, 2008, 04:26:15 PM »
When I took the LSAT in 2003, I read the first sentence of each paragraph, the first and last paragraphs and then the questions (not the answers). I then returned to the passage and read it fast in search of answers to the questions and when I found an answer, I marked it. I was able to only skim many sentences for key words.

I finished with over 10 minutes left to review my answers and missed one question. It worked for me, doesn't mean it'll work for anybody else.

Re: reading comp advice...
« Reply #8 on: July 08, 2008, 09:04:30 AM »
i have the same problem with reading comp, and it seems like many people recommend the nova master the lsat book for its reading comp material.  obviously, it isn't the same as prep tests, but is an idea if you are looking for something else!

Re: reading comp advice...
« Reply #9 on: July 08, 2008, 12:46:10 PM »
copeydokey-

Definitely think you can still use old LSATs for practice, if for no other reason than familiarity with formatting and endurance.

I agree that RC has gotten much more difficult.  I know this has been suggested in other threads, but I would seriously recommend reading other sources daily.  What you read isn't that important, as long as its at a fairly high level - the economist is decent, ideally you would read some science journals too.  The key is how you read - practice what I think of as "aggressive" reading.  Watch for author's perspective, assumptions, implications, etc.  Obviously these skills are required for LSAT RC, but it can be tricky to apply them to longer passages when you know there aren't multiple choice questions coming up.  Still, I found just this conditionning of my brain was the best asset I had going into RC.  Good luck, b/c RC is definitely conquerable.