Law School Discussion

Native Americans, AA, and Law School

mbw

  • ****
  • 2426
  • TTTundra Law 2012
    • View Profile
Re: Native Americans, AA, and Law School
« Reply #10 on: July 08, 2008, 09:41:37 PM »
Native Americans/American Indians (or as I shorthand, NDN  ;)) are very underrepresented in law school.  Less than 500 Indians (average over the past 5 years) apply to law school, less than 350 actually matriculate (and I suspect a fair number of those are Indians in Card/Ancestor Only, with little to no cultural affiliation.)  The T20 take 40 of those, traditional NDN programs such as Arizona, NM, OK and Denver, another 80-90.  The mean LSAT for NDNs in 2006 was around 149, versus 154 for white/Asians; fewer than 1% of NDNs score a 165+.

I'm Maine/Quebec Abenaki, strongly culturally affiliated (as well as involved in pan-Indian politics), and will be applying to most of the T14 from T6 on down (although I'll probably throw an app at Stanford.)  What are you thinking about for schools?



What's with the big "cultural affiliation" obsession?  ::)  Do you think blacks should carry a spear and wear bones in their noses in order to claim URM status?

Due to the nation-to-nation relationship between the federal government and the domestic-dependent Indian Nations, being NDN in the US is political and cultural - it is not about "race" or ethnicity, as is being "black"/African-American.  Thus, cultural/political affiliation is central to one's "Indianness".  There is no "status" Indian designation, as in Canada - you're Indian if you're enrolled/culturally affiliated, not because your great-great-granny was supposedly a Cherokee Princess.

UFBoldAsLove

  • ****
  • 1519
  • Go Gators.
    • View Profile
Re: Native Americans, AA, and Law School
« Reply #11 on: July 09, 2008, 11:05:08 AM »
Tag for later.

mbw

  • ****
  • 2426
  • TTTundra Law 2012
    • View Profile
Re: Native Americans, AA, and Law School
« Reply #12 on: July 09, 2008, 05:58:00 PM »
Native Americans/American Indians (or as I shorthand, NDN  ;)) are very underrepresented in law school.  Less than 500 Indians (average over the past 5 years) apply to law school, less than 350 actually matriculate (and I suspect a fair number of those are Indians in Card/Ancestor Only, with little to no cultural affiliation.)  The T20 take 40 of those, traditional NDN programs such as Arizona, NM, OK and Denver, another 80-90.  The mean LSAT for NDNs in 2006 was around 149, versus 154 for white/Asians; fewer than 1% of NDNs score a 165+.

I'm Maine/Quebec Abenaki, strongly culturally affiliated (as well as involved in pan-Indian politics), and will be applying to most of the T14 from T6 on down (although I'll probably throw an app at Stanford.)  What are you thinking about for schools?



What's with the big "cultural affiliation" obsession?  ::)  Do you think blacks should carry a spear and wear bones in their noses in order to claim URM status?

Due to the nation-to-nation relationship between the federal government and the domestic-dependent Indian Nations, being NDN in the US is political and cultural - it is not about "race" or ethnicity, as is being "black"/African-American.  Thus, cultural/political affiliation is central to one's "Indianness".  There is no "status" Indian designation, as in Canada - you're Indian if you're enrolled/culturally affiliated, not because your great-great-granny was supposedly a Cherokee Princess.

For some reason, my posts are disappearing on threads, yet they show up in my "latest posts" on my profile.  Anyone else having this problem?

Re: Native Americans, AA, and Law School
« Reply #13 on: July 09, 2008, 06:28:52 PM »
For some reason, my posts are disappearing on threads, yet they show up in my "latest posts" on my profile.  Anyone else having this problem?

Actually, yes, now that you mention it.  A big chunk of the June LSAT score release thread disappeared, but my posts are still in my history.  I assumed that it was just due to the score day traffic overload, but perhaps the problem is more widespread.   ???

Re: Native Americans, AA, and Law School
« Reply #14 on: July 09, 2008, 08:40:26 PM »
I'm not certain how being Native American is relevant to looking or acting Native American.  If I choose to be involved in the culture and I can prove my authenticity, does it matter that I no longer live on a reservation or am more assimilated?  I must admit that I have already had a school give me a cold shoulder because I no longer look NA.  If they want me for diversity, it should not matter what I look like, as long as I am what I say I am.