Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: ..DAR..FUR...tantalizing diplomacy...  (Read 14113 times)

! B L U E WAR R I O R..!

  • LSD Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 8173
  • "make a friend who was once a stranger" br.war.
    • View Profile
..DAR..FUR...tantalizing diplomacy...
« on: June 29, 2008, 01:59:57 AM »
Burkina Faso minister to be Darfur mediator

Sat 28 Jun 2008, 8:26 GMT
 


UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - Burkina Faso Foreign Minister Djibril Bassole has been chosen as the new U.N. and African Union joint chief mediator for Darfur, though his appointment has yet to be confirmed, diplomats said on Friday.

Several diplomats told Reuters the United Nations and AU had settled on Bassole as the best choice to try to broker a resolution to the five-year-old conflict in Sudan's western region of Darfur.

 "Bassole has been chosen," said one diplomat. "Now the question is whether everyone involved will give their final agreement."

The diplomats spoke on condition of anonymity because the appointment is not yet official. They said it was still possible that Sudanese President President Omar Hassan al-Bashir could object to Bassole's appointment.

However, they said the AU was expected to endorse Bassole as the mediator at its foreign ministers meeting now under way in the Egyptian Red Sea town of Sharm el-Sheikh.

If confirmed, Bassole will replace the dual negotiating team of AU special envoy for Darfur Salim Ahmed Salim and his counterpart at the United Nations, Jan Eliasson.

Burkina Faso helped mediate talks between the government and rebels in Ivory Coast's civil war and Bassole was actively involved.

Diplomats on the U.N. Security Council have said there is wide agreement that the idea of having two mediators going in and out of Darfur has not been an effective way of getting the Sudanese government and Darfur rebels to make peace.

The appointment of a single U.N.-AU mediator permanently based in Darfur is long overdue, they said.

International experts estimate that some 200,000 people have died and another 2.5 million been left homeless because of the conflict in Darfur. Khartoum says 10,000 have died.

Darfur's stalled peace talks were dealt another blow last month when the rebel Justice and Equality Movement attacked a suburb of Khartoum.

Eliasson and Salim said this week an international summit should be called to put pressure on the parties to come back to the negotiating table.

If you prick us, do we not bleed?  
  if you tickle us, do we not laugh? if you poison  
  us, do we not die? and if you wrong us, shall we not  
  revenge? m.of v. w.shaka                                             speare

! B L U E WAR R I O R..!

  • LSD Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 8173
  • "make a friend who was once a stranger" br.war.
    • View Profile
Re: ..DAR..FUR...tantalizing diplomacy...
« Reply #1 on: July 02, 2008, 11:43:50 PM »
...chad needs to get on board...where is the president momar quahdahfi?
If you prick us, do we not bleed?  
  if you tickle us, do we not laugh? if you poison  
  us, do we not die? and if you wrong us, shall we not  
  revenge? m.of v. w.shaka                                             speare

! B L U E WAR R I O R..!

  • LSD Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 8173
  • "make a friend who was once a stranger" br.war.
    • View Profile
Re: ..DAR..FUR...tantalizing diplomacy...
« Reply #2 on: July 02, 2008, 11:45:34 PM »
Summit needed to jumpstart peace in Darfur - UN, AU
Wed 25 Jun 2008, 6:02 GMT
 
[-] Text
  • By Louis Charbonneau


UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - Top U.N. and African Union envoys on Tuesday called for an international summit on the 5-year-old conflict in Darfur to pressure Sudan and rebel groups to end violence and restart stalled peace talks.

In a bleak report to the U.N. Security Council on the situation in Darfur, U.N. special envoy Jan Eliasson said there was "reason to seriously question whether the parties are ready to sit down at the negotiation table and make the compromises necessary for peace."

 Eliasson and his African Union counterpart Salim Ahmed Salim said international organizations, the 15 members of the Security Council and other U.N. member states should pressure the government and rebels to end hostilities and make peace.

They said that a "high-level international meeting" including Sudan, Security Council countries, other major powers and African states, as well as probably the rebels, might help force Khartoum and the rebels to make peace.

"As a new approach is required in dealing with this crisis, such a meeting will provide a unique opportunity for reflection, consideration and action," Salim told the council.

Eliasson said a summit would provide an opportunity for countries to use their influence and "bilateral leverage" to pressure Khartoum and the rebels to resume peace talks.

Human rights activists have called on China to use its substantial influence to push Khartoum to remove obstacles to the full deployment of a U.N.-AU peacekeeping force, known as UNAMID, in Darfur. So far only 9,000 of the planned 26,000 UNAMID troops and police are on the ground in western Sudan.

Salim made it clear that negotiations between Khartoum and the rebels had ground to a halt.

"The political process has reached an impasse," Salim said. "There is a need to rethink the strategy on the way forward."

In a new report on UNAMID, U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said last month's attack by the rebel Justice and Equality Movement (JEM) on Omdurman, a suburb of Khartoum, was "a stark reminder that peace in Darfur remains elusive."

"The JEM attack on Omdurman and the continued fighting between rebel groups and the government and its allied forces indicate that the parties are not ready for serious talks," Ban said in his report to the Security Council.

Since the attack, the government has been reluctant to talk to JEM, which Khartoum says is backed by Chad.

ESCALATING VIOLENCE

International experts estimate that some 200,000 people have died and another 2.5 million been left homeless because of the conflict in Darfur. Khartoum says 10,000 have died.

Eliasson and Salim both listed several things that must happen if there was to be peace in Darfur. First of all, the 2005 peace deal between northern and southern Sudan that ended two decades of civil war must be fully implemented so that the Sudanese government could show it is a trustworthy partner.

Secondly, Chad and Sudan needed to normalize relations and put an end to the escalating violence, they said. Both Chad and Sudan accuse each other of supporting rebel groups that oppose the other's government.

Finally, peace talks must resume and UNAMID must be fully deployed. Western countries have blamed Khartoum for the slow deployment, accusing it of handpicking nationalities and blocking non-African contingents.

But U.N. officials complain that troop-contributing countries have failed to provide essential hardware, such as helicopters, which UNAMID need to travel across Darfur, a region roughly the size of France.

Salim warned the council that even if all 26,000 UNAMID troops were deployed in Darfur, they would not bring calm to western Sudan if the government and rebels did not want peace.

If you prick us, do we not bleed?  
  if you tickle us, do we not laugh? if you poison  
  us, do we not die? and if you wrong us, shall we not  
  revenge? m.of v. w.shaka                                             speare

! B L U E WAR R I O R..!

  • LSD Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 8173
  • "make a friend who was once a stranger" br.war.
    • View Profile
Re: ..DAR..FUR...tantalizing diplomacy...
« Reply #3 on: July 16, 2008, 11:16:24 PM »
Bush, Compaore discuss Mugabe, Darfur
By: iStockAnalyst   Wednesday, July 16, 2008 7:26 PM



U.S. President George W. Bush said Wednesday he is disappointed that Russia and China vetoed a U.N. arms embargo against Zimbabwe.

The United States strongly supported the U.N. Security Council resolution to sanction Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe following his re-election last month after his opponent exited the race amid fears for his life.



"We deeply care about the plight of the citizens of Zimbabwe. And we hope there's a peaceful resolution soon," Bush said after meeting with Burkinabe President Blaise Compaore. "I made my position abundantly clear that, one, we are disappointed with the veto of the U.N. Security Council resolution."

Bush called Compaore "a constructive force for peace and stability."

Compaore said he and Bush also talked about the need for a political solution to the crisis in Darfur, which he said is "weighing very heavily in all Africa."

Burkina Faso has qualified for a five-year, $480-million grant from the U.S. Millennium Challenge Corp. to help farmers by investing in irrigation, expanding access to land titles and credit, among other things.
If you prick us, do we not bleed?  
  if you tickle us, do we not laugh? if you poison  
  us, do we not die? and if you wrong us, shall we not  
  revenge? m.of v. w.shaka                                             speare

! B L U E WAR R I O R..!

  • LSD Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 8173
  • "make a friend who was once a stranger" br.war.
    • View Profile
Re: ..DAR..FUR...tantalizing diplomacy...
« Reply #4 on: July 16, 2008, 11:30:13 PM »
indigos sign on...us reads like we going there aye think...get ready...or are we there al ready.


Bashir charged with Darfur genocide
By Barney Jopson in Khartoum and Megan Murphy in London

Published: July 15 2008 03:00 | Last updated: July 15 2008 03:00

Omar al-Bashir, the Sudan-ese president, has been formally charged with genocide in Darfur by the prosecutor of the Inter-national Criminal Court, a move that threatens to cause further instability in Sudan and puts the ICC's credibility on the line.

Luis Moreno-Ocampo, the ICC's chief prosecutor, said he could no longer "stay silent" over the campaign of murder, rape and displacement being carried out in Sudan's Darfur region, where about 300,000 people have been killed and 2.5m forced from their homes since 2003, according to United Nations estimates.

A total of 10 charges have been filed against the president: three counts of genocide, five of crimes against humanity and two of -murder.

The indictment, which was widely trailed, was met with anger and indignation by the Khartoum government, which has not recognised the court and has -characterised the charges as evidence of a western conspiracy to remove Mr Bashir from power.

The move has split opinion among politicians and diplomats outside the country: some applaud the ICC's pursuit of justice at the highest level but others fear it could kill off any chance of ending the Darfur conflict by negotiation with the government.

Darfur, in the west of Sudan, has been racked by violence since rebels seeking a greater share of power and wealth launched an insurgency five years ago. It triggered aerial bombardment and attacks by Arab militia groups sponsored by the government.

Mr Moreno-Ocampo said Mr Bashir had masterminded and implemented a plan to destroy three Darfur tribes seen to be challenging the province's marginalisation. "His motives were largely political. His alibi was a 'counterinsurgency'. His intent was genocide,"

he said in a statement. He asked ICC judges to issue an arrest warrant for Mr Bashir and their ruling is expected in one to three months.

Ali al-Sadiq, a Sudanese foreign ministry spokesman, said: "The ICC indictment of the president has completely disregarded the efforts undertaken by the government, the regional powers and the international community [on Darfur]."

Some Darfur experts say the indictments risk creating a siege mentality within the Khartoum regime that prevents any form of productive engagement aimed at bringing peace to Darfur.

The African Union said: "The AU's position is that nothing should be done that might jeopardise the peace processes in Sudan."

But Sudan activists say resorting to the ICC was a necessary step, since the efforts of the inter-national community - encompassing sanctions, peace processes and a joint UN-AU peacekeeping force - have yielded few positive results.

Staff at the UN, which the Sudanese regime views as the ICC's master, had feared the indictments would trigger reprisals. But those fears receded on Monday as a government spokesman said the UN and its peacekeepers would not be expelled and Khartoum would actively seek to protect them.

The streets of the capital remained calm before and after the announcement of the indictment, but one student leader said a large demonstration was being planned for today.

The US is the only country to have said the conflict in Darfur amounts to genocide. Mr Moreno-Ocampo's indictment is likely to put the US on the spot because it has refused to become a member of the ICC over concern that its own citizens might be charged.
If you prick us, do we not bleed?  
  if you tickle us, do we not laugh? if you poison  
  us, do we not die? and if you wrong us, shall we not  
  revenge? m.of v. w.shaka                                             speare

! B L U E WAR R I O R..!

  • LSD Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 8173
  • "make a friend who was once a stranger" br.war.
    • View Profile
Re: ..DAR..FUR...tantalizing diplomacy...
« Reply #5 on: July 16, 2008, 11:31:44 PM »
tuesday july 22nd...

dear al...how are things...
If you prick us, do we not bleed?  
  if you tickle us, do we not laugh? if you poison  
  us, do we not die? and if you wrong us, shall we not  
  revenge? m.of v. w.shaka                                             speare

! B L U E WAR R I O R..!

  • LSD Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 8173
  • "make a friend who was once a stranger" br.war.
    • View Profile
Re: ..DAR..FUR...tantalizing diplomacy...
« Reply #6 on: July 23, 2008, 12:12:46 AM »
Beshir to tour Darfur under war crimes cloud
2 hours ago

KHARTOUM (AFP) Sudanese President Omar al-Beshir, facing a possible international arrest warrant for allegedly masterminding genocide in Darfur, is to make a rare visit to the war-torn region on Wednesday.

The two-day trip will take the head of state, a bevy of officials and a plane load of journalists, to the three state capitals in the vast arid region, El Fasher in the north, Nyala in the south and El Geneina in the west.

At each stop he is scheduled to address popular ceremonies organised in his honour, as well as hold talks with state government officials, local leaders and political party representatives, the presidency announced.

Beshir heads first to El Fasher, the old capital of Darfur and headquarters for a poorly manned and equipped UN-led peacekeeping mission.

He then proceeds to Nyala, where he will inaugurate development projects and visit a water station, before flying on to El Geneina, not far from the Chadian border, on Thursday and returning to Khartoum.

International Criminal Court prosecutor Luis Moreno-Ocampo accuses Beshir of instructing his forces to annihilate three non-Arab groups in Darfur, masterminding murder, torture, pillaging and using rape to commit genocide.

Members of those groups, the Fur, Masalit and Zaghawa, some of whom belong to Beshir's National Congress Party in the complex overlapping nature of the Darfur conflict, are also expected to greet the president.

State media quoted Beshir as reiterating to Arab lawyers on Monday that Sudan rejected any outside interference, "blackmail and pressure" and vowed again never to surrender any citizen to the international community.

The United Nations says that up to 300,000 people have died and more than 2.2 million have fled their homes since the conflict erupted in February 2003. Sudan says 10,000 have been killed.

The war began when African ethnic minority rebels took up arms against the Arab-dominated Khartoum regime and state-backed Arab militias, fighting for resources and power in one of the most remote and deprived places on earth.

Presidency officials refused to comment on the purpose or the timing of Wednesday's visit, but analysts predicted the move was part of Sudan's intense diplomatic offensive to stave off potential ICC charges.

"I think the purpose of the visit is to show that the people of Darfur do not agree with the ICC," said Adil el-Baz, editor in chief of the independent Al-Ahdath newspaper.

"It makes him look politically very good if the people of Darfur welcome him and observers see thousands of people rushing to welcome him. This will give him a new image in the international community," he told AFP.

The government is in full control of the three main towns of Darfur, which are heavily protected from the open desert and scrub where the conflict pitting the army and state-backed militias against ethnic rebels has been conducted.

Beshir's regime is focused on trying to persuade the UN Security Council to freeze possible legal proceedings should ICC judges actually issue an arrest warrant, on the grounds that it could jeopardise peace prospects.

The African Union, supported by the Arab League, on Monday urged the UN Security Council to stall possible legal action against Beshir.

The Council can pass a resolution to defer for a period of 12 months, renewable, any investigation or prosecution by the ICC with a majority of nine votes, including the concurring votes of all five permanent members.

Of those five, China and Russia are concerned about the ICC move. The United States does not recognise the ICC but has said genocide is taking place in Darfur.

France, where Sudanese Foreign Minister Deng Alor has been holding talks, and Britain have signed up to the ICC.

Of the 10 rotating members, Sudan hopes to bank on the support of at least Burkina Faso, Libya, South Africa and Indonesia.

The remaining members are EU countries Belgium and Italy; Croatia, Costa Rica, Panama and Vietnam.

Beshir last visited Darfur in 2007 in a bid to demonstrate commitment to developing the region.
If you prick us, do we not bleed?  
  if you tickle us, do we not laugh? if you poison  
  us, do we not die? and if you wrong us, shall we not  
  revenge? m.of v. w.shaka                                             speare

! B L U E WAR R I O R..!

  • LSD Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 8173
  • "make a friend who was once a stranger" br.war.
    • View Profile
Re: ..DAR..FUR...tantalizing diplomacy...
« Reply #7 on: July 23, 2008, 01:18:56 AM »
Beshir to tour Darfur under war crimes cloud
2 hours ago

KHARTOUM (AFP) Sudanese President Omar al-Beshir, facing a possible international arrest warrant for allegedly masterminding genocide in Darfur, is to make a rare visit to the war-torn region on Wednesday.

The two-day trip will take the head of state, a bevy of officials and a plane load of journalists, to the three state capitals in the vast arid region, El Fasher in the north, Nyala in the south and El Geneina in the west.

At each stop he is scheduled to address popular ceremonies organised in his honour, as well as hold talks with state government officials, local leaders and political party representatives, the presidency announced.

Beshir heads first to El Fasher, the old capital of Darfur and headquarters for a poorly manned and equipped UN-led peacekeeping mission.

He then proceeds to Nyala, where he will inaugurate development projects and visit a water station, before flying on to El Geneina, not far from the Chadian border, on Thursday and returning to Khartoum.

International Criminal Court prosecutor Luis Moreno-Ocampo accuses Beshir of instructing his forces to annihilate three non-Arab groups in Darfur, masterminding murder, torture, pillaging and using rape to commit genocide.

Members of those groups, the Fur, Masalit and Zaghawa, some of whom belong to Beshir's National Congress Party in the complex overlapping nature of the Darfur conflict, are also expected to greet the president.

State media quoted Beshir as reiterating to Arab lawyers on Monday that Sudan rejected any outside interference, "blackmail and pressure" and vowed again never to surrender any citizen to the international community.

The United Nations says that up to 300,000 people have died and more than 2.2 million have fled their homes since the conflict erupted in February 2003. Sudan says 10,000 have been killed.

The war began when African ethnic minority rebels took up arms against the Arab-dominated Khartoum regime and state-backed Arab militias, fighting for resources and power in one of the most remote and deprived places on earth.

Presidency officials refused to comment on the purpose or the timing of Wednesday's visit, but analysts predicted the move was part of Sudan's intense diplomatic offensive to stave off potential ICC charges.

"I think the purpose of the visit is to show that the people of Darfur do not agree with the ICC," said Adil el-Baz, editor in chief of the independent Al-Ahdath newspaper.

"It makes him look politically very good if the people of Darfur welcome him and observers see thousands of people rushing to welcome him. This will give him a new image in the international community," he told AFP.

The government is in full control of the three main towns of Darfur, which are heavily protected from the open desert and scrub where the conflict pitting the army and state-backed militias against ethnic rebels has been conducted.

Beshir's regime is focused on trying to persuade the UN Security Council to freeze possible legal proceedings should ICC judges actually issue an arrest warrant, on the grounds that it could jeopardise peace prospects.

The African Union, supported by the Arab League, on Monday urged the UN Security Council to stall possible legal action against Beshir.

The Council can pass a resolution to defer for a period of 12 months, renewable, any investigation or prosecution by the ICC with a majority of nine votes, including the concurring votes of all five permanent members.

Of those five, China and Russia are concerned about the ICC move. The United States does not recognise the ICC but has said genocide is taking place in Darfur.

France, where Sudanese Foreign Minister Deng Alor has been holding talks, and Britain have signed up to the ICC.

Of the 10 rotating members, Sudan hopes to bank on the support of at least Burkina Faso, Libya, South Africa and Indonesia.

The remaining members are EU countries Belgium and Italy; Croatia, Costa Rica, Panama and Vietnam.

Beshir last visited Darfur in 2007 in a bid to demonstrate commitment to developing the region.
If you prick us, do we not bleed?  
  if you tickle us, do we not laugh? if you poison  
  us, do we not die? and if you wrong us, shall we not  
  revenge? m.of v. w.shaka                                             speare

! B L U E WAR R I O R..!

  • LSD Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 8173
  • "make a friend who was once a stranger" br.war.
    • View Profile
Re: ..DAR..FUR...tantalizing diplomacy...
« Reply #8 on: July 24, 2008, 12:46:31 AM »
Genocide's legacy in Bosnia, Darfur
 Email story
 Print
   Choose text size
 Report typo or correction
 License this article
 
Jul 23, 2008 04:30 AM
Comments on this story  (2)
Strutting the Balkan stage at the height of his notoriety, Radovan Karadzic's foppish head of hair made him an instantly recognizable poster boy for accused war criminals. Defiant and unrepentant in his day, he is utterly unrecognizable today: bearded, gaunt and greying a shadow of his former self as the wartime Bosnian Serb president.

A decade after he went on the run, Karadzic's genocidal legacy has caught up with him, but the charge sheet remains unchanged. Accused of masterminding the deaths of as many as 8,000 Muslims in Bosnia's 1992-95 war, he had slipped in and out of Belgrade all this time unhindered, but not undetected.

What changed, apart from his appearance, was the political landscape. Now, with time running out on the mandate of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, and with Serbia looking for a new beginning in Europe, there was a confluence of motive and timing.

After all, there had been previous sightings of Karadzic, just not the political will to seize him. A former psychiatrist, Karadzic never hunkered down in a spider hole like Saddam Hussein; he practised medicine in the open. Undoubtedly, elements of the security services had protected Karadzic and his co-accused, former military commander Ratko Mladic, whom police now say they are closing in on.

Much credit for the new approach goes to Serbian President Boris Tadic, who narrowly fended off a nationalist resurgence in recent elections and has rallied his fledgling coalition government behind a vision of engagement with Europe. He recognizes that part of the price for membership in the European Union remains a full accounting for Serbian wartime atrocities in Europe's worst massacre since World War II. By war's end, some 250,000 people were dead and 1.8 million displaced.

UN judges and prosecutors in The Hague will move briskly once Karadzic is extradited, keen to avoid the mistakes they made with another accused war criminal, former Yugoslav president Slobodan Milosevic, who turned his four-year trial into a soapbox and died before the court could render a verdict.

Karadzic's capture sends a timely signal to human rights abusers that the world will not forget, despite the passage of time. Just last week, the International Criminal Court filed genocide charges against Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir. He was accused of masterminding the systematic murder, rape and ethnic cleansing of the people of Darfur, where 300,000 people have died and 2.5 million are displaced.

Like Karadzic at the height of his power, al-Bashir has brushed aside the charges. The victims of human rights abuses, whether in Bosnia or Darfur, need to know there will be justice; so, too, do the perpetrators.



 
Comments on this story are moderated| Login to Comment Commenting Guidelines 
 
Sitting Leaders Cannot Be Immune
I think the cases of Karadzic and Milosevic reinforce the effectiveness of charging war criminals, even if they are still government leaders. Justice may not be immediate, but the message is clear. In the case of Sudan, there is still a great deal of controversy over the decision to seek an arrest warrant for the Sudanese President. Even if it is not affected immediately, however, the possibility of an arrest warrant makes it more likely that President Bashir will eventually have to answer for his actions. He is on the very end of the chain of command and therefore at least partly responsible for the deaths of 300,000 people and the displacement of millions. Justice may not be the first priority at the moment for the people in Darfur, but it is reassuring to know that this man will not be able to live out his days in comfort.

Posted by itemple at 3:36 PM Wednesday, July 23 2008

 
If you prick us, do we not bleed?  
  if you tickle us, do we not laugh? if you poison  
  us, do we not die? and if you wrong us, shall we not  
  revenge? m.of v. w.shaka                                             speare

faster

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 1
    • View Profile
Re: ..DAR..FUR...tantalizing diplomacy...
« Reply #9 on: July 25, 2008, 01:24:29 PM »
Since most of the people here are law students, it means you're all good students.  To understand Darfur, you must study the history of this regime.  It's worse than what you hear on the news.  MUCH.

I'm disabled, living now in Mexico on SS Disability.  Before I came here, I learned (in 1994) about the Sudanese genocide, while doing research in the library for a book I was writing.   I stumbled upon the information entirely by accident.  What I learned stood my hair on end, and not just because of the genocide, but because our entire freeworld governments and media were keeping the public from knowing about it, through the simple expedient of calling it a "civil war."

Here's what that "civil war" often consisted of.  Government troops would enter a native village in Southern Sudan, herd all the people into their own thatched cattle-byres, then set them to the torch.  After burning their homes, livestock and crops, it was on to the next village.

Civil war?  If that isn't genocide, what is?  Now you know that words really CAN kill.

It was only because the southern black people formed militias and tried to protect themselves that the term "civil war" was slapped on this genocide.  I guess they were supposed to lie down and open their veins.  But there are indigenous militias in Darfur, too, but nobody is calling that a civil war.  Mainly because they can't.  It has gotten too much publicity.  Otherwise, the world and its media would ignore this genocide, too.  Had the first genocide gotten this publicity long ago, Darfur wouldn't have happened.  And maybe - just maybe - neither would Bosnia, Rwanda, and others.  A successful genocide always breeds more of the same.  Which is exactly what the world GOT.

You'll want to know the basis for these statements.  All you need do is check with Amnesty International.  They kept volumes of documentary evidence of these and many other atrocities.  More than enough to lay charges of genocide against the regime as long ago as '94, probably earlier.

This genocide began in the mid-80's (probably before that) and only ended with a "peace agreement" a few years ago.  They then turned their attentions to Darfur.  It had lasted for 20 years, and it appears they're gearing up to start it all over again, particularly if the pressure they're under about Darfur forces them to tone it down for a while.

I have much to say, from the years I've spent researching the Sudanese regime, too much to put down here.  I have established a yahoo account called stop genocide.  Put an underscore between those two words, and you've got it.  Use the word "Sudan" in the subject line, to distinguish from spam.  I'll send you information that I've gleaned over the years.  I am selling exactly nothing.

The world knows, but refuses to acknowledge, that no genocidal regime has ever been stopped with diplomacy.  People capable of genocide have no regard for diplomacy, except as a way of confusing opponents and gaining time.  They are people who have voluntarily chosen to disengage themselves from their humanitarian moorings, and now can never go back.  The only thing they understand is force.  Though I am a dove, I have no choice but to accept that force is the only way to rid the Sudan of this obscene regime.  If there is ONE single reason for war, it is to stop genocides.  Yet every other kind of war is engaged in except that kind.

You may also wish to inquire why it is that not ONE Islamic State has spoken out against the Sudan.  In fact, several of them are protesting the indictment against Bashir, claiming it trespasses on Sudanese sovereignty.  It might inspire you to study why it is that Islam appears to condone genocide.

No nation is entitled to sovreignty when it preys on the people whose job it is to protect.  When the "sanctity of international borders" is of greater importance than the sanctity of the human lives within them, we, too, have parted from our own humanitarian moorings.

The people in Darfur are black and indigenous - the government wants them all dead.  But they're Muslims.  To offset any grousing among the northern Arabs in Khartoum and Omdurman, the government uses the janjaweed as their surrogate.  In the earlier genocide, such subtleties were not needed.  Yet we call Darfur a genocide and don't even recognize the FIRST GENOCIDE.  Darfur is treated, worldwide, as though it was something that occurred "in a vacuum," when, in reality, it is only Chapter 2 of a larger - and much more horrific - genocide.

In the first genocide, 2 1/2 MILLION indigenous, non-Muslim blacks were slaughtered, over a period of 20 YEARS, during which the entire free world said nothing.  To our everlasting shame.

Now, they're stuck.  They can't make any references to the first genocide that would help them in considering or dealing with the Darfur situation.  Awkward indeed.  To do so would be to admit the two decades in which genocide went on, unimpeded and with total impunity, while our governments and media knew full-well what was going on, but kept us in the dark about it.

What you don't know is that Darfur, an acknowledged genocide, is actually the "gentler" of the two.

This bears on much more than just two genocides perpetrated by the Sudan.  It bears - heavily - on the question of just how free our own nations really are, and how free and objective our news media really are.  To keep secret something that ought to have been headline news - internationally - is something that ought to scare you to bits.

You all know how to do research.  I urge you to do it.  Look up such things as "Arabization," "Islamization," and names from the first genocide, such as Hasan al Turabi and John Garang.  "Arabization" will tell you exactly HOW rape can be used as part of a genocide.  Check out the slavery, too, which occurred in the first genocide - and note that slavery is NOT on the list of charges against Bashir.  It can't be; it happened in that "other genocide," the one that "didn't happen."  Research the atrocities of the first genocide, starting with Amnesty Int'l.  The information is all there; it simply isn't something the public is guided to at all.

The world in which you intend to work, and your chosen field of the law, make it imperative that you learn something about how even the best democracies can fail in their basic duties to their own citizens.  And you ought to learn how this silence came about, how all of the freeworld nations participated, how it is that all political parties are equally complicit in this silence.  How could such a thing happen?  If it happened, and if nothing is done, it can and will happen again.  We ignore this matter very much at our OWN peril.

If you would seek to work in the legal field, you must gain some knowledge about how the law, and the public trust vested in governments and media, can be so heinously compromised, while we citizens remain ignorant of it all for decades.

You cannot begin to understand Darfur until you have studied the first Sudanese genocide.  That puts Darfur in perspective rather eloquently.

You have more resources available to you than I do.  Learn of this first genocide, then use your resources to make this information available to the entire free world public.  We can't fix a problem we don't know exists.  If you do your studying well enough, you'll have AMPLE chapter and verse to support that publicity effort.  You can make the knowledge available for the average world citizen to learn about.

Maybe then something can be done to clean up whatever rot it was that caused our governments and media to betray their public trust by collectively hiding a horrible truth from us all.

Holly Bergeim
Chapala, Jalisco, Mexico