Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: ..DAR..FUR...tantalizing diplomacy...  (Read 13890 times)

! B L U E WAR R I O R..!

  • LSD Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 8173
  • "make a friend who was once a stranger" br.war.
    • View Profile
Re: ..DAR..FUR...tantalizing diplomacy...
« Reply #20 on: August 15, 2008, 02:42:04 AM »
Home / News / World / Asia   
Bush urges China to use clout with Sudan on Darfur
 President George W. Bush and the China's President Hu Jintao shake hands in The Great Hall of the People before a reception in honor of the 2008 Summer Olympic Games in Beijing, China, August 8, 2008. (REUTERS/Larry Downing)
Email|Print|Single Page| Text size – + By Matt Spetalnick
August 11, 2008
BEIJING (Reuters) - President George W. Bush said on Monday he used talks with China's leaders during the Beijing Olympics to press them to use their influence with Sudan to help end the humanitarian crisis in Darfur.

Wrapping up his Olympics tour, Bush said that in Sunday's meetings with President Hu Jintao and other officials he raised U.S. concerns, including human rights and religious freedoms in China and the situation in Sudan's troubled Darfur region.

"My attitude is if you've got relations with (Sudanese President Omar Hassan al-Bashir), think about helping to solve the humanitarian crisis in Darfur," Bush said in an interview with NBC Sports. "That was my message to the Chinese government."

Support for Sudan -- China is a key investor in its oil industry and Khartoum's biggest arms supplier -- has been among the sources of international criticism of Beijing as the world's spotlight has fallen on it for the Olympic games.

Bush has denounced the Sudanese government for its policies in the Darfur region, where conflict has taken some 200,000 lives and displaced some 2.5 million people since rebels took up arms against the government in 2003.

Bush has called it genocide, a charge the Sudanese government has rejected.

The United States protested to China over its decision before the Games' opening ceremonies to revoke the visa of Olympic gold medalist Joey Cheek, an activist for Darfur.

"Joey Cheek has just got to know that I took the Sudanese message for him (to the Chinese government)," Bush said.

Bush said he also made his case for more religious freedom in China in private talks with the Communist leadership after worshipping at a state-sanctioned Beijing church, and said Hu "listened politely."

"It gave me a chance to say to the Chinese people, religion won't hurt you," Bush said.

"And it gave me a chance to say to the government, why don't you register the underground churches and give them a chance to flourish?"

Bush's four-day visit to Beijing was a balancing act, taking in the Olympic games and praising China on a variety of issues while publicly nudging China to improve its internationally criticized record on human rights.

(Editing by Jerry Norton)

If you prick us, do we not bleed?  
  if you tickle us, do we not laugh? if you poison  
  us, do we not die? and if you wrong us, shall we not  
  revenge? m.of v. w.shaka                                             speare

! B L U E WAR R I O R..!

  • LSD Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 8173
  • "make a friend who was once a stranger" br.war.
    • View Profile
Re: ..DAR..FUR...tantalizing diplomacy...
« Reply #21 on: August 15, 2008, 10:09:26 AM »
Darfur peacekeepers face logistics nightmare
Fri 15 Aug 2008, 10:09 GMT
 
[-] Text
  • By Opheera McDoom


KHARTOUM (Reuters) - It will take weeks to deploy more peacekeepers to Darfur even once reinforcements arrive because of the difficulties of operating in the remote region of western Sudan, the force commander said on Friday.

Only 9,900 of the 26,000 soldiers and police in the U.N.-African Union force have been deployed and the target of getting 80 percent on the ground by the end of the year looks increasingly unlikely to be met.

 The slow arrival of peacekeepers has been blamed on both Sudanese delays and U.N. bureaucracy.

Force commander Martin Luther Agwai told Reuters that even once troops arrive, there was a problem moving vast quantities of weapons, ammunition, vehicles and generators across thousands of kilometres of hostile terrain from Sudan's only port.

"It cannot be anything less than eight weeks to move one container to Darfur," he said, adding that the equipment had to move from Darfur's main towns to the force's remote bases.

"We are looking at the issue of using railways, we are looking to get more aircraft from friends to move the equipment, we are looking at other options all over," he added.

International experts estimate 200,000 people have died and 2.5 million been driven from their homes since mostly non-Arab rebels took up arms in Darfur in 2003, accusing central government of neglect.

The U.N.-African Union mission is supposed to protect civilians but the absence of a peace deal in Darfur makes its task even more difficult. At full strength it should be the world's largest U.N.-funded peacekeeping mission.

THOUSANDS OF CONTAINERS

Agwai, a Nigerian, said 335 Egyptian engineers just deployed had brought 1,000 containers of equipment with them.

Those engineers will help build barracks for the soldiers in the northern Darfur sector. Chinese engineers will build barracks for the south and UNAMID is awaiting a Pakistani engineering company for West Darfur.

Agwai said each battalion for UNAMID needed 26 Armoured Personnel Carriers (APCs) and 80 trucks. An Egyptian battalion of 800 soldiers was ready to deploy, he added, but could not come to Darfur without its equipment or barracks.

Agwai said Sudan's government could help by expediting customs clearances at Port Sudan, in the east, and by providing armed escorts for the convoys into Darfur, in the west of Africa's biggest country. UNAMID has no mandate outside Darfur.

Security in Darfur is a major concern with almost daily bandit attacks on commercial and aid convoys, forcing cuts to rations for millions of people.

Agwai said some equipment could be flown in but that would require more money from donors or aircraft from friendly countries. The force also needs 25 helicopters, but nobody has come forward to provide them.

Agwai asked the Darfuri people for patience.

"Definitely it's frustrating for them but also we should explain to them the reality on the ground," he said.

"We are all pushing hard to see if we can reach 80 percent by the end of the year, if we don't it's not do or die," he said.

If you prick us, do we not bleed?  
  if you tickle us, do we not laugh? if you poison  
  us, do we not die? and if you wrong us, shall we not  
  revenge? m.of v. w.shaka                                             speare

! B L U E WAR R I O R..!

  • LSD Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 8173
  • "make a friend who was once a stranger" br.war.
    • View Profile
Re: ..DAR..FUR...tantalizing diplomacy...
« Reply #22 on: August 16, 2008, 12:31:36 PM »
Rebels accuse Sudanese army of new Darfur attacks
Sat 16 Aug 2008, 9:52 GMT
 
[-] Text
By Opheera McDoom

KHARTOUM (Reuters) - Darfur rebels accused Sudan's government of more attacks on Saturday, saying Khartoum was not serious about peace and was pursuing a military solution to the conflict.

Sudan's army denied the allegation and said its troops had fought off an ambush in an isolated incident.

 The joint U.N.-African Union peacekeeping mission in the remote region said it was checking the reports.

"The government army and militia attacked us yesterday in Abu Hamra and Kofod east of Kutum in North Darfur," Nimr Mohamed, spokesman for the Sudan Liberation Army under Abdel Wahed Mohamed el-Nur, told Reuters from Darfur.

"The National Congress Party talks peace but in reality on the ground they are pursuing a military solution," he said on Saturday. He added that rebel and army forces were still in the area and he expected further clashes.

Two rebels were killed and many civilians were killed or wounded in the crossfire, he said.

A Sudanese army spokesman denied attacking, saying troops were accompanying a convoy of local officials when they were attacked by bandits on camels whom they fought off without any losses.

"These areas don't even belong to SLA Abdel Wahed," the spokesman said.

Since the International Criminal Court announced steps last month to indict President Omar Hassan al-Bashir for genocide and war crimes, he paid a defiant visit to Darfur calling for all rebel groups to attend peace talks.

The only faction that signed a largely unimplemented 2006 peace deal with Khartoum also accused the army of attacking its areas on Thursday.

"The government attacked us in Dorma, North Darfur...killing five of our troops," said Mohamed Drbeen, military spokesman for the SLA faction led by presidential adviser Minni Arcua Minnawi.

The army said it had no information on these clashes.

Rebels say this is part of a wider campaign by Khartoum before new peace efforts under new joint U.N.-African Union mediator Djibril Bassole.

This week, a massive army force seized control of rebel areas in the remote north of Darfur.

Before previous peace talks, government and rebel forces have launched attacks to control as much land as possible.

International experts estimate about 200,000 people have been killed and 2.5 million driven from their homes since mostly non-Arab rebels took up arms in early 2003, accusing the central government of neglect.
If you prick us, do we not bleed?  
  if you tickle us, do we not laugh? if you poison  
  us, do we not die? and if you wrong us, shall we not  
  revenge? m.of v. w.shaka                                             speare

! B L U E WAR R I O R..!

  • LSD Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 8173
  • "make a friend who was once a stranger" br.war.
    • View Profile
Re: ..DAR..FUR...tantalizing diplomacy...
« Reply #23 on: August 19, 2008, 01:36:41 AM »
Bashir's accusation has forced Sudan to be responsive
By Hussein Solomon
Commentary by
Tuesday, August 19, 2008

 

In July 2008, Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir became the first sitting head of state to be accused by the prosecutor of the International Criminal Court (ICC) of war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide. According to the charge sheet, Bashir "masterminded and implemented a plan to destroy in substantial part the Fur, Masalit and Zaghawa groups" in Sudan's Darfur region. (It should also be noted that arrest warrants have already been issued by the ICC against Sudanese officials Ahmad Harun and Ali Kushayb for their involvement in the ongoing carnage in Darfur. Khartoum has refused to hand anyone over.) In this campaign of ethnic persecution, which began in February 2003, 300,000 lives have been lost and 2.2 million people have been displaced.

Luis Moreno-Ocampo, the chief prosecutor of the ICC, laid out in stark detail the brutality of the war currently being waged in Darfur: "The most efficient method to commit genocide today in front of our eyes is gang rapes, rapes against girls and rapes against 70-year old women. Babies born as a result have been called Janjaweed babies and this has led to an explosion of infanticide. Bashir is executing this genocide without gas chambers, without bullets and without machetes. The desert will do it for them ... hunger is the weapon of this genocide as well as rape."

The mixed international reaction to these charges was predictable but still disappointing. Both the African Union and China made clear that they wanted the charges against the Sudanese president dropped, arguing that they would undermine any prospects for sustainable peace in the Sudan. Such arguments are fallacious in the extreme since, for some years, it has been increasingly evident that there is no peace to keep in Darfur; while the Sudanese government has also undermined the provisions of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement, thus risking war between the north and the south, as we have recently witnessed in the oil-rich town of Abyei. The position of the AU is wholeheartedly supported by Khartoum, which has been stressing flawed notions of "African solutions for African problems" despite knowing full well that the AU has neither the capacity nor the political will to deal with the likes of Bashir or Robert Mugabe. Moreover, the more than 4 million Congolese who have perished in the conflict in that blighted country eloquently reflect the AU's record in conflict resolution.

As for Beijing's complicity in shielding Sudan's president from international justice, the significant trade relationship between Sudan and China hardly needs to be pointed out. Sudan is one of China's main exporters of oil. China, meanwhile, is a major arms supplier to Sudan.

The European Union, together with various international non-governmental organizations, has been generally supportive of the ICC and the charges against Bashir. British Prime Minister Gordon Brown and French Foreign Minister Bernard Kouchner have made it clear that Sudan should comply with the decisions of the ICC. Meanwhile, both Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International have been supportive of the ICC decision, believing that it is "an important step towards ensuring accountability for human rights violations in Sudan."
 

What has been disappointing in the pursuit of international justice is the reaction from the United Nations and the United States. The UN secretary general has distanced the UN from the ICC, noting that the court is not a part of the UN. As for the US, while it has agreed that war criminals should be exposed and brought to trial, it is hesitant to allow the ICC's jurisprudence to extend over any heads of state.

This is an unfortunate position. If the US wants to be taken seriously as a superpower intent on promoting human freedom and democracy, then this ambiguity has to end. A good place to start would be to be a part of the ICC. Historically, we have seen how the absence of the US from the League of Nations after World War I damned that organization to irrelevance. With the likes of Moscow and Beijing supporting Bashir, it is morally incumbent upon Washington to stand up for the morality and the ideals it so loudly proclaims.

The most interesting reaction, however, emanates from Khartoum itself. In the immediate aftermath of the charges being announced, Sudan reacted furiously, with a senior official threatening to turn Darfur into a graveyard. However, it is clear that Bashir has been rattled by the charges and has engaged in a multi-pronged offensive. The first front was a diplomatic offensive targeting Sudan's allies in the Arab League and the AU to help pressure the ICC not to go ahead with the charges, as well as seeking and getting the support it needed from Beijing. The second front of the offensive was to mend ties with Sudan's western neighbor Chad, after Khartoum accused Ndjamena of backing a rebel attack on its capital in May 2008.

The third front of the offensive was internal. During the course of July and August, the Sudanese president reached out to the political opposition in Khartoum, sought to foster closer ties with the Sudan Peoples Liberation Movement (SPLM) in the south, embarked on a tour of Darfur and promised various development projects to alleviate the lot of the people there. Thus, whatever the international reaction to the ICC charges is, they are already creating a more responsive posture on the part of Khartoum to its long-suffering people - something the US with its sanctions and the UN with its moral authority have thus far been unable to do.

If you prick us, do we not bleed?  
  if you tickle us, do we not laugh? if you poison  
  us, do we not die? and if you wrong us, shall we not  
  revenge? m.of v. w.shaka                                             speare

! B L U E WAR R I O R..!

  • LSD Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 8173
  • "make a friend who was once a stranger" br.war.
    • View Profile
Re: ..DAR..FUR...tantalizing diplomacy...
« Reply #24 on: August 19, 2008, 08:51:51 AM »
 ::)

Turkish president discusses "Darfur" with Sudan's president 
 
 
www.chinaview.cn  2008-08-19 19:48:12      Print
 
    ANKARA, Aug. 19 (Xinhua) -- Turkish President Abdullah Gul and Sudan's President Omar Hassan al-Bashir discussed "Darfur" at a meeting in the Turkish largest city of Istanbul on Tuesday, the semi-official Anatolia news agency reported.

    On July 14, International Criminal Court (ICC) Chief Prosecutor Luis Moreno-Ocampo formally requested an arrest warrant against Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir for alleged war crimes in the western Sudanese region of Darfur, which was strongly refuted by the Sudanese government.

    Bashir, who arrived in Turkey on Monday to attend a Turkey-Africa economic cooperation summit held the meeting with Gul in an Ottoman-era palace by the Bosphorus strait.

    Speaking at the meeting, Gul was quoted as saying that everybody felt sorrow over the human tragedies regardless of their race, language, and religion, and everybody should do his best to put an end to such pain.

    Gul also said that Turkey would continue to offer health services in Sudan.

    The two presidents also discussed economic relations, where Gulasked more opportunities to be provided to Turkish private sector in Sudan.
 
If you prick us, do we not bleed?  
  if you tickle us, do we not laugh? if you poison  
  us, do we not die? and if you wrong us, shall we not  
  revenge? m.of v. w.shaka                                             speare

! B L U E WAR R I O R..!

  • LSD Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 8173
  • "make a friend who was once a stranger" br.war.
    • View Profile
Re: ..DAR..FUR...tantalizing diplomacy...
« Reply #25 on: August 22, 2008, 01:07:22 AM »
Sudanese: 'What Arab-African rift?'
In Sudan's Arab north, Arabs marry, go to school, and work side by side with Africans from Darfur. The divide portrayed in the West means little to people here.
By Heba Aly | Contributor to The Christian Science Monitor
from the August 22, 2008 edition

 E-mail   Print   Letter to the Editor   Republish   del.icio.us   digg 

Dongola, Sudan - Ask Abbas Adam Ibrahim whether he is Arab or African, and he does not quite know how to respond. "Both," the Sudanese man says, after slight hesitation.

Mr. Adam comes from the Fur tribe, of Darfur – commonly understood to be an African tribe, under persecution by Sudan's Arab-dominated government.

Last month, the International Criminal Court's chief prosecutor indicted Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir for genocide and crimes against humanity in Darfur, saying "evidence shows that al-Bashir masterminded and implemented a plan to destroy in substantial part the Fur, Masalit, and Zaghawa groups, on account of their ethnicity."

But for Sudanese Arabs and Africans coexisting peacefully outside Darfur, these racial distinctions are not so clear.

Adam, for example, believes he has some Arab blood.

During the drought of the early 1980s, Adam left Darfur for the mostly-Arab north of Sudan, in search of work and a better life. He settled in Dongola, a city more than 300 miles north of the capital, Khartoum, and has lived among Arabs ever since. He even married one and now has four "mixed" children.

"We live here peacefully and there are no problems," he says. "We live as if we are natives here. We feel that this is our country and this is our town."

Around the corner, at a small Darfurian social club, the atmosphere is loud and buoyant. Young men gather around tables playing cards, slamming down dominoes excitedly, and watching television. They are mostly economic migrants who left Darfur years ago. Among them are members of various tribes that are killing each other back in Darfur and in neighboring Kordofan State.

"There is no such thing as Arab or African. We are all Sudanese," says Mohammed El-Cheikh an Arab from Western Kordofan. "Him over there," he says, pointing across the yard to a young man standing shyly in the corner, "that's my friend Abubakr. He's from the [African] Tama tribe.

"There are problems in Darfur, but they are not between people. They are related to the government and to politics."

In scores of markets, clubs, and homes in the Arab north, Arabs and Africans are working side by side, sending their children to the same schools and intermarrying. The Arab-African distinction that has played out so broadly in media coverage of Darfur means little to people here.

In fact, historians say the distinction has no factual basis. There is a long tradition of intermarrying between the Arab and African tribes that settled in what is now Sudan.

"No single tribe in Sudan can claim it is purely African or Arab," says history teacher and mayor of the greater Dongola locality Bushra Mohamed Saleh. "They are all mixed."

And while some tribes may be more Arab or more African, coexistence between them is nothing new. Even in Darfur, different tribal groups lived together for centuries. So-called Arab nomadic tribes and African farming communities shared the same land – the nomads using it for their cattle to graze; the farmers using it to grow their crops. Conflicts arose routinely but were solved through traditional leaders.

Things changed early this millennium when traditional leaders lost their control, guns became more commonplace, and a group of non-Arab Darfurians took up arms against the government, arguing that their region had been neglected.

In responding to this rebellion, the government made a "big, big, big mistake," says Gen. Hassan Hamadain, who governed West Darfur State during the late 1990s.

It called upon popular defense forces from local communities to combat the Darfur rebels. But those who responded were mostly Arabs, many of whom joined the now infamous janjaweed militia that is accused of razing hundreds of African villages, looting, raping, and killing along the way.

"The government made use of the conflict in Darfur in a kind of non-thoughtful way," says General Hamadain, who has since retired from politics, acknowledging that he and others failed in Darfur. "It was not sensitive to the tribal relationships, the tribal history of the area, and the resources."

And so what began as normal, cyclical conflicts between mostly Arab herders and non-Arab farmers grew to what has been termed the world's largest humanitarian disaster. The United Nations says some 300,000 have died and 2.5 million have been displaced.

Among the dead were members of Hassan Ali Ibrahim's village, which was completely destroyed by Arabs. But he says he can't hold them all responsible.

"The disputes between the Arabs and people in Darfur originate from different reasons – grazing, pastures, natural things. They are not rooted in race," said the community elder, sitting under a tree at the Islamic school he manages in Dongola, where both Arab and African children sit side by side. "The Arabs that are here have nothing to do with this."

Still, for some Darfurians, it is not so easy to forget. Daoud (not his real name) watched with his own eyes as members of his family were killed by Arab militias in West Darfur. After the first attack on his village, he found his father dead. He says he does not blame the Arabs – "Who supported them? Who gave them the guns? Wasn't it the government?" – but he still has difficulty getting too close.

"I can interact with Arabs at work or in general ways, but when it comes to close relationships, I feel there is a wall between us."

British analyst Jago Salmon says this social polarization – a result he blames partly on simplistic descriptions by Western Darfur advocates – has been an unfortunate consequence of the conflict, but was never its root.

"We were still looking for dichotomy of some kind, something that would explain what was going on easily and simply. We latched onto the Arab-African dichotomy, which did vast damage…. Then as the conflict developed, it became a reality on the ground. It became something by which people explained the conflict themselves."

But as the conflict continues in Darfur – 180,000 have fled their homes this year alone, according to the UN – Adam will wake up next to his Arab wife every morning, Ali will teach his Arab students, and plenty of other African Darfurians will keep living alongside Arabs, wishing the politics would cease and their tribes could go back to life as usual.

If you prick us, do we not bleed?  
  if you tickle us, do we not laugh? if you poison  
  us, do we not die? and if you wrong us, shall we not  
  revenge? m.of v. w.shaka                                             speare

! B L U E WAR R I O R..!

  • LSD Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 8173
  • "make a friend who was once a stranger" br.war.
    • View Profile
Re: ..DAR..FUR...tantalizing diplomacy...
« Reply #26 on: August 27, 2008, 01:32:54 PM »
http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/breaking-news/ireland/oshea-slams-wests-response-to-latest-darfur-violence-13954701.html


O'Shea slams West's response to latest Darfur violence

Wednesday, 27 August 2008


The head of the GOAL aid agency is again criticising the international community over its response to the latest reported atrocity against refugees in Darfur.


Up to 64 people were killed and scores more injured when Sudanese police and soldiers opened fire on the Kalma camp in western Darfur two days ago.

Many of the dead are reported to be women and children.

The Sudanese Government says its forces were responding to rebel gunfire from the camp, which houses around 80,000 people.

GOAL chief executive John O'Shea, who has been a strong critic of the West's approach to the Darfur crisis, says the international community needs to do more than simply express outrage
If you prick us, do we not bleed?  
  if you tickle us, do we not laugh? if you poison  
  us, do we not die? and if you wrong us, shall we not  
  revenge? m.of v. w.shaka                                             speare

! B L U E WAR R I O R..!

  • LSD Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 8173
  • "make a friend who was once a stranger" br.war.
    • View Profile
Re: ..DAR..FUR...tantalizing diplomacy...
« Reply #27 on: September 01, 2008, 01:05:30 AM »
New UN-AU mediator for Darfur conflict assumes duty 
 
 
www.chinaview.cn  2008-08-29 15:22:42      Print
 
    NAIROBI, Aug. 29 (Xinhua) -- The newly appointed chief of the joint United Nations-African Union effort to bring peace to Darfur has assumed duties in the conflict-wracked Sudanese region.

    A statement from the UNAMID received here Friday said Djibril Yipene Bassole, the Joint Chief Mediator for Darfur, has pledged to consult as widely as possible with the warring parties to try to find a lasting solution.

    Bassolé assumed his duties in El Fasher, the capital of North Darfur state and the headquarters of the hybrid UN-AU peacekeeping force (known as UNAMID).

    According to the UN news release, the chief mediator stressed that any negotiations to resolve the five-year conflict that has killed an estimated 300,000 people and displaced 2.7 million others cannot take place in a climate of tension and mistrust.

    "We have to put mechanisms in place that will not only allow a sustained ceasefire, but will also help avoid reoccurrence of violent incidents," he said.

    Bassole said his priority was to hold talks with all the players on the ground in Darfur, where the number of rebel groups has splintered in the past year or so from a handful to around 30.

    "The important phase for my assignment obviously is to get in touch with all the players on the ground so that I can absorb the realities on the ground, and to organize quite quickly a few work sessions so as to directly engage the issues," Bassole said.

    Rodolphe Adada, the head of UNAMID and the Joint Special Representative of the UN and the AU in the region, met with Bassole on Thursday and promised that the mission would do everything it could to back his peace efforts.

    Bassole is slated to visit South Darfur and West Darfur over the next four days before returning to Khartoum, the national capital.

    Commenting on the recent incident in Kalma camp in South Darfur, in which 32 people, among them women and children lost their lives, Bassole announced that measures would be put in place to mitigate such a sad episode.

    "One can not consider lightly any event which has caused such a tragic loss ... obviously everyone has his own share of responsibility," the JCM said.

    Bassole said he did wish that Internally Displaced People (IDP)camps remain safe and secure areas so that the kind of violence that just occurred doesn't happen again.

    JCM who said he understood the concerns of government and also those of the armed groups, stated however that "we have to sit around the table and find solutions that make everyone secure.
 
If you prick us, do we not bleed?  
  if you tickle us, do we not laugh? if you poison  
  us, do we not die? and if you wrong us, shall we not  
  revenge? m.of v. w.shaka                                             speare

! B L U E WAR R I O R..!

  • LSD Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 8173
  • "make a friend who was once a stranger" br.war.
    • View Profile
Re: ..DAR..FUR...tantalizing diplomacy...
« Reply #28 on: September 16, 2008, 11:59:10 PM »
Chad, Sudan to renew diplomatic ties, create peacekeeping force
11 hours ago

LIBREVILLE (AFP) — Sudan and Chad are to restore diplomatic relations, which broke off in May, mediators said Tuesday, paving the way to create a peacekeeping and security force on their common border.

The contact group, which comprises Gabon, Libya, Congo, Senegal, Eritrea, Chad and Sudan, issued a statement Tuesday confirming the breakthrough, five months after Khartoum severed ties accusing Ndjamena of backing rebels in its Darfur region.

"Fruitful exchanges have enabled the firm commitment of Chad and Sudan to formally restore diplomatic relations with the exchange of ambassadors before the contact group's sixth meeting in October in Ndjamena," it said.

The statement came after a contact group meeting on Friday to discuss the issue in the Eritrean capital Asmara.

The meeting also decided to finalise preparations for a security force of 1,000 Sudanese and 1,000 Chadian soldiers to protect observers who would monitor the border.

"The contact group is committed to deploying a peacekeeping and security force as soon as possible and open an operational command centre in Tripoli," the Libyan capital, the statement said.

The details on the organisation of the security forces still have to be "finalised", Chad's Foreign Minister Moussa Faki told AFP on Tuesday.

"We will have to finalise all that," Faki said by telephone from Libreville. "The principle has been agreed. Chad supplies 1,000 men and Sudan supplies another 1,000."

But Faki ruled out further joint operations between Chad and Sudan, except those carried out under the control of EUFOR, the EU's peacekeeping mission which has a presence in central Africa.

Chadian rebels welcomed the agreement but threatened to take arms again if "a true peace process was not set in motion," rebel leader Abderaman Koulamallah told AFP.

"We reiterate our desire for a true peace process in Chad. If there is no peace process, there will be war," he said.

Sudan broke off diplomatic relations with Chad in May after Darfur rebels of the Justice and Equality Movement (JEM) launched an attack near the capital Sudanese capital, Khartoum.

Chad denied any involvement but relations between the two countries have long been difficult, with each country denying the other's accusations that they are supporting rebel movements fighting against their respective regimes.

"Sudan needs to sort out the problem of Darfur and stop trying to make itself believe that Chad is part of the problem," Faki said.

The two countries also broke off diplomatic relations in 2006 for four months after a rebel attack on Chad.
If you prick us, do we not bleed?  
  if you tickle us, do we not laugh? if you poison  
  us, do we not die? and if you wrong us, shall we not  
  revenge? m.of v. w.shaka                                             speare

! B L U E WAR R I O R..!

  • LSD Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 8173
  • "make a friend who was once a stranger" br.war.
    • View Profile
Re: ..DAR..FUR...tantalizing diplomacy...
« Reply #29 on: September 16, 2008, 11:59:46 PM »
Chad, Sudan to renew diplomatic ties, create peacekeeping force
11 hours ago

LIBREVILLE (AFP) — Sudan and Chad are to restore diplomatic relations, which broke off in May, mediators said Tuesday, paving the way to create a peacekeeping and security force on their common border.

The contact group, which comprises Gabon, Libya, Congo, Senegal, Eritrea, Chad and Sudan, issued a statement Tuesday confirming the breakthrough, five months after Khartoum severed ties accusing Ndjamena of backing rebels in its Darfur region.

"Fruitful exchanges have enabled the firm commitment of Chad and Sudan to formally restore diplomatic relations with the exchange of ambassadors before the contact group's sixth meeting in October in Ndjamena," it said.

The statement came after a contact group meeting on Friday to discuss the issue in the Eritrean capital Asmara.

The meeting also decided to finalise preparations for a security force of 1,000 Sudanese and 1,000 Chadian soldiers to protect observers who would monitor the border.

"The contact group is committed to deploying a peacekeeping and security force as soon as possible and open an operational command centre in Tripoli," the Libyan capital, the statement said.

The details on the organisation of the security forces still have to be "finalised", Chad's Foreign Minister Moussa Faki told AFP on Tuesday.

"We will have to finalise all that," Faki said by telephone from Libreville. "The principle has been agreed. Chad supplies 1,000 men and Sudan supplies another 1,000."

But Faki ruled out further joint operations between Chad and Sudan, except those carried out under the control of EUFOR, the EU's peacekeeping mission which has a presence in central Africa.

Chadian rebels welcomed the agreement but threatened to take arms again if "a true peace process was not set in motion," rebel leader Abderaman Koulamallah told AFP.

"We reiterate our desire for a true peace process in Chad. If there is no peace process, there will be war," he said.

Sudan broke off diplomatic relations with Chad in May after Darfur rebels of the Justice and Equality Movement (JEM) launched an attack near the capital Sudanese capital, Khartoum.

Chad denied any involvement but relations between the two countries have long been difficult, with each country denying the other's accusations that they are supporting rebel movements fighting against their respective regimes.

"Sudan needs to sort out the problem of Darfur and stop trying to make itself believe that Chad is part of the problem," Faki said.

The two countries also broke off diplomatic relations in 2006 for four months after a rebel attack on Chad.
If you prick us, do we not bleed?  
  if you tickle us, do we not laugh? if you poison  
  us, do we not die? and if you wrong us, shall we not  
  revenge? m.of v. w.shaka                                             speare