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Author Topic: Chapman v. NYLS v. Suffolk?  (Read 2273 times)

hoi7815

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Re: Chapman v. NYLS v. Suffolk?
« Reply #10 on: June 27, 2008, 11:54:33 AM »
I originally wanted to practice in either Southern California or NYC area.  However, as I stated in my OP, I think Boston area is ok now (after I visited Suffolk).

According to the stat., there is no meaningful difference between NYLS and some well respected local 2nd tier schools.  For exmaple, Brooklyn places 4.2% of its graduates into big firms and St. John's places 3.7% of its graduates into big firms.  I do not think there is a difference between 3% and 4.2%, or betwen 3% and 3.7%.  My point is that why people consider both Brooklyn and St. John's much better law schools than NYLS even though there is actually no difference in job placement (in big firms).  The tuition and living expense of these two schools are as expensive as those of NYLS.  If this job placement stat. implies that NYLS is not worth the money, I think the same logic should be applied to these two schools (plus Seton Hall) as well.

Actually, I wanted to go NYLS before I saw some negative posts about NYLS.  It seems NYLS has a really bad reputation.  Thus, I inclined to Chapman after seeing those posts.  However, after I visited Suffolk, I felt Suffolk is ok as well.   This is why I cannot decide where to go.


StevePirates

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Re: Chapman v. NYLS v. Suffolk?
« Reply #11 on: June 27, 2008, 10:02:09 PM »

Actually, I wanted to go NYLS before I saw some negative posts about NYLS.  It seems NYLS has a really bad reputation.  Thus, I inclined to Chapman after seeing those posts.  However, after I visited Suffolk, I felt Suffolk is ok as well.   This is why I cannot decide where to go.

Other than what you've heard on this board, what has made you think that NYLS has a bad reputation?  Have you talked to many students at NYLS and found them to be unhappy?

Also, at this point, if you think you like Boston the most, go to Suffolk.  The ol' go where you want to practice routine.

hoi7815

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Re: Chapman v. NYLS v. Suffolk?
« Reply #12 on: June 27, 2008, 10:34:30 PM »
I met a few students at both NYLS and Suffolk and most of them liked their schools.  Their consesus was if I can make top third, I do not have to worry about job.

Two 2nd year students at NYLS told me their class ranks are about 50% and they expected that their starting salary would be about $65,000-$75,000.  It seemed that they did not actually worry about being a jobless after graduate.  I did not actually hear very bad things about NYLS from other sources.  I am currently working at a law firm in Manhattan.  My boss who is a Columbia law graduate told me that law schools (in NYC area) below Fordham are alomst the same in terms of the job prospects.    

One 3rd year student at Suffolk told me that she was still looking for a job because her rank is below average.  However, according to her, even though the Economy is bad, most of her classmates in top 50% of the class obtained jobs even before graduate. 


StevePirates

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Re: Chapman v. NYLS v. Suffolk?
« Reply #13 on: June 28, 2008, 02:01:00 AM »
Then for me, I'd say decide whether you like Boston or New York more, and go there.

JUNE 2008

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Re: Chapman v. NYLS v. Suffolk?
« Reply #14 on: July 11, 2008, 11:41:01 PM »
As I know, you will have a better chance for the big law firm as a NYLS student.  However, you will have a better chance for a decent job as a Suffolk student. I know people at both law schools and they told me the following:  If you cannot make top 40% at NYLS, it is not likely that you will get a decent law job. On the other hand, you will get a decent law job as long as you make top 60% at Suffolk.     

I heard NYLS once was a quite good law school because several former Columbia Law professors (one of them was a then dean of CLS) founded this law school in late 19th century.  For this reason, there still are relatively substantial numbers of partners from NYLS are in big law firms.  I think this may explain why NYLS consistently places meaningful numbers of its students into big law firms even though it is a third tier law school. 

baileypicks24

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Re: Chapman v. NYLS v. Suffolk?
« Reply #15 on: July 12, 2008, 12:30:15 PM »
I met a few students at both NYLS and Suffolk and most of them liked their schools.  Their consesus was if I can make top third, I do not have to worry about job.

Two 2nd year students at NYLS told me their class ranks are about 50% and they expected that their starting salary would be about $65,000-$75,000.  It seemed that they did not actually worry about being a jobless after graduate.  I did not actually hear very bad things about NYLS from other sources.  I am currently working at a law firm in Manhattan.  My boss who is a Columbia law graduate told me that law schools (in NYC area) below Fordham are alomst the same in terms of the job prospects.   

One 3rd year student at Suffolk told me that she was still looking for a job because her rank is below average.  However, according to her, even though the Economy is bad, most of her classmates in top 50% of the class obtained jobs even before graduate. 

I think most non-New Yorkers don't realize how irrelevant $65k is in New York. Making $65k in NYC will basically allow you to maintain a lifestyle the equivalent of making $30k in a city like Charlotte. No exaggeration. I caution everyone to factor in the cost of living when comparing average salaries.

http://cgi.money.cnn.com/tools/costofliving/costofliving.html

JUNE 2008

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Re: Chapman v. NYLS v. Suffolk?
« Reply #16 on: July 12, 2008, 06:35:41 PM »
Making $65k in NYC will basically allow you to maintain a lifestyle the equivalent of making $30k in a city like Charlotte.

Thank you for the useful link.  Since I am living in a NYC area, I can say something about the living expense issue.  According to CNNMONEY.COM, if you live in Bergen county in NJ while working in Manhattan, your $65,000 income would actually be equivalent to $100,980.  That is to say, making $65,000 in Manhattan and living in suburban areas, this allows you to maintain a lifestyle the equivalent of making $100,980 in Manhattan and living in Manhattan.  If you live in Queens, NY, your $65,000 income would be equivalent to $92,110.  Since it takes only about 30-40 minutes to commute from these two areas to Manhattan, working in Manhattan and making $65,000 seems a fine option as long as you do not live in Manhattan.  A lot of people commute in NY.

baileypicks24

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Re: Chapman v. NYLS v. Suffolk?
« Reply #17 on: July 13, 2008, 10:36:22 AM »
Making $65k in NYC will basically allow you to maintain a lifestyle the equivalent of making $30k in a city like Charlotte.

Thank you for the useful link.  Since I am living in a NYC area, I can say something about the living expense issue.  According to CNNMONEY.COM, if you live in Bergen county in NJ while working in Manhattan, your $65,000 income would actually be equivalent to $100,980.  That is to say, making $65,000 in Manhattan and living in suburban areas, this allows you to maintain a lifestyle the equivalent of making $100,980 in Manhattan and living in Manhattan.  If you live in Queens, NY, your $65,000 income would be equivalent to $92,110.  Since it takes only about 30-40 minutes to commute from these two areas to Manhattan, working in Manhattan and making $65,000 seems a fine option as long as you do not live in Manhattan.  A lot of people commute in NY.

Yup. There's NYC, and then there's New York State. $65k means a heck of a lot more an hour or two from NYC, than in NYC. I have friends who live in New Jersey and take the train into Penn Station every morning.

Ashlee

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Re: Chapman v. NYLS v. Suffolk?
« Reply #18 on: July 24, 2008, 01:20:16 PM »
At NYLS you will be faced with EXCELLENT career prospects.  Case in point, the latest job posting on the NYLS career site:

Title:  Driver Messenger
Description:  DRIVER-MESSENGER
DIVISION OF COURT OPERATIONS
$29,426 + $1,302 LOCATION PAY
NON COMPETITIVE

QUALIFICATIONS:

SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION OF THE EIGHTH GRADE OR THE EQUIVALENT; AND POSSESSION OF A
VALID DRIVERS LICENSE IN NEW YORK STATE TO OPERATE THE TYPE OF MOTOR VEHICLE IN USE;
OR AN EQUIVALENT COMBINATION OF EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE.
DISTINGUISHING FEATURES OF WORK:

Driver-Messengers are responsible for operating motor vehicles and delivering court and other documents, and materials to courts, government agencies, and other buildings. They also transport court employees on official business and perform various routine clerical and other related duties.

ASSIGNMENT:

In addition to the work features mentioned above, Drivers-Messengers will be required to assist the office in
normal day to day activities including, but not limited to, data entry and moving/shelving records storage boxes.
(Average weight per box is 30-40 pounds.)


YES, you can use that NYLS JD to drive a truck!!!!!!!!!!!!!!  In fact, it clearly says that all you need is an 8th grade education and a driver's license.  The greatest thing is that someone at Career Services actually sat there and thought "Why yes, this is the sort of job our alum would be perfect for."