Law School Discussion

Logic Games by Type and Question

Re: Logic Games by Type and Question
« Reply #10 on: June 23, 2008, 06:26:16 PM »
Taken from LG bible appendix

Sorted by (PT#-Game# ie., 7-1 means PT 7 game #1)

Basic Linear: balanced

7-1
13-2
15-1
17-1
19-1
23-1
24-2
26-2
27-1
29-3
30-4
32-3

Advanced Linear: balanced

7-2
20-4
24-3
25-4
26-1
28-3

grouping defined moving balanced
7-3
11-1
14-3
14-1
22-1
25-2
34-4

Advanced linear balanced identify template
16-2
19-2
22-2
30-3

identify the possibilities
11-4
12-4

grouping defined fixed balanced
12-2
19-3
19-4
16-1

grouping defined fixed underfunded
9-1
28-2
17-2
30-1

grouping defined fixed overfunded
9-2
15-4
20-2
22-4
23-3
24-4

pattern
13-4
10-3
16-4
9-3
20-3
23-4

grouping identify the possibilities
24-1
27-4
29-1
26-4

grouping identify the templates
27-3
25-3
29-2
26-3

grouping defined mixed unbalanced
11-3
33-3

Advanced Linear Unbalanced
16-3
20-1
21-3
21-4
22-3
31-1
32-4
33-4

Re: Logic Games by Type and Question
« Reply #11 on: June 23, 2008, 06:31:58 PM »
While I don't think steph's setup is the quickest, it works for her, and that is what makes it the best for her. The importance to take away from it is, get the Bibles, use them for helping you do setups, and if you need modifications to your setups, create your own. I'm sure this is what everyone does. I used about 90% of the info in the LG Bible for setup related stuff, but sometimes putting something my own way, is easier for me to diagram. Anyway, there is a thread around here somewhere that lists the games by type, but if you go through the back of the LG bible it will also tell you PT by PT how they break down the LG I think...

yeah, exactly.  i'm just saying--the powerscore bible isn't the be-all-end-all of logic games setups as most people on the internet will have you believe.  but i'm going to stick with my recommendation of trying to get good at remembering details about each logic game because despite what meggo said, it will *drastically* cut down your time.  i finished the most recent logic games section on the june 2008 test with eight minutes to spare, and i'm confident that i got every question right.  (and when i took my very first practice test, i was so bad at logic games that i skipped the entire section completely!)

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Re: Logic Games by Type and Question
« Reply #12 on: June 23, 2008, 07:23:21 PM »
I guess - I don't understand how doing what you do cuts down on time or is different than what Powerscore recommends. Because, correct me if I misread what you typed, you create little boxes for each number of spaces (however many there are 5,6,7,8 etc) and in each box you put what can't go there? How is that different than drawing a line for each space, and putting underneath what can't go there?

Re: Logic Games by Type and Question
« Reply #13 on: June 23, 2008, 07:28:43 PM »

logic games were by far my best section on the test.  arguments...kinda shaky.  but logic games were my female dog.  my advice is to stay away from the techniques in the powerscore bible and instead just use it for the practice questions.  their methods take way too long to learn and they want you to write out wayyyy too much stuff.  you'll spend your entire time diagramming and then you won't have time to answer the "which of the following could be true" questions.  also, don't time yourself on any other game except official lsat games because they are the only ones that are specifically designed to be done in 7-8 minutes.  mcgraw hill's games are too easy and princeton review's are too hard. 

i know it sounds obvious, but go with your gut on the game diagrams.  don't waste your time learning how to diagram a game the way someone else wants you to do it.  find a method that makes sense to you--something that you can intuitively get a handle on.  for ordering games, i was a big fan of drawing out 6 or 7 boxes in a row (or however many the game called for) and filling in information there.  if Q couldn't go first, i'd write "-Q" in the first box.  if H had to go sixth, i'd write "H" in the sixth box, etc.  make the boxes big enough so you can put lots of stuff in them.

try to build up a good memory, too.  powerscore recommends writing everything out so you don't have to erase anything, but i aced the logic games by just remembering where certain things had to go.  the more games you do, the better your memory will get.  :)


First of all, that's some horrible diagramming advice.
Use the LGB; it's good.
And the whole box thing and making it large enough to fit other crap is absurd.

But I kind of agree with your memory advice and intuiting for efficiency.
Though, it has more to do with familiarity than memory.
Once you've practiced enough games, it gets easier to remember the rules and their interplay, which helps get through the questions much faster.  And I think this is what you were trying to get at.
It may even help to spend a few seconds looking at each rule to commit them to memory.
But proper diagramming is just as important, and for that, you want to learn the LGB.
And what the hell..  it doesn't even take long to learn it.
I went through the thing in one sitting and never had to look back since their way of diagramming just made sense.

Re: Logic Games by Type and Question
« Reply #14 on: June 23, 2008, 07:31:47 PM »

logic games were by far my best section on the test.  arguments...kinda shaky.  but logic games were my female dog.  my advice is to stay away from the techniques in the powerscore bible and instead just use it for the practice questions.  their methods take way too long to learn and they want you to write out wayyyy too much stuff.  you'll spend your entire time diagramming and then you won't have time to answer the "which of the following could be true" questions.  also, don't time yourself on any other game except official lsat games because they are the only ones that are specifically designed to be done in 7-8 minutes.  mcgraw hill's games are too easy and princeton review's are too hard. 

i know it sounds obvious, but go with your gut on the game diagrams.  don't waste your time learning how to diagram a game the way someone else wants you to do it.  find a method that makes sense to you--something that you can intuitively get a handle on.  for ordering games, i was a big fan of drawing out 6 or 7 boxes in a row (or however many the game called for) and filling in information there.  if Q couldn't go first, i'd write "-Q" in the first box.  if H had to go sixth, i'd write "H" in the sixth box, etc.  make the boxes big enough so you can put lots of stuff in them.

try to build up a good memory, too.  powerscore recommends writing everything out so you don't have to erase anything, but i aced the logic games by just remembering where certain things had to go.  the more games you do, the better your memory will get.  :)


First of all, that's some horrible diagramming advice.
Use the LGB; it's good.
And the whole box thing and making it large enough to fit other crap is absurd.

But I kind of agree with your memory advice and intuiting for efficiency.
Though, it has more to do with familiarity than memory.
Once you've practiced enough games, it gets easier to remember the rules and their interplay, which helps get through the questions much faster.  And I think this is what you were trying to get at.
It may even help to spend a few seconds looking at each rule to commit them to memory.
But proper diagramming is just as important, and for that, you want to learn the LGB.
And what the hell..  it doesn't even take long to learn it.
I went through the thing in one sitting and never had to look back since their way of diagramming just made sense.


it's not crap, and it's not absurd.  once i started doing it that way, i never missed another logic game again.

and meg, you're right--in that respect, it's similar to powerscore, but whereas powerscore has you rewrite everything so you don't erase your original diagram, i "memorize" the rules and work freely within the boxes, erasing as i please.  i know it sounds unwise, but if you can get the hang of it, it seriously cuts down your time.

Re: Logic Games by Type and Question
« Reply #15 on: June 23, 2008, 07:42:18 PM »
Its all about figuring out what works for you personally. For me, I'd worked about 40 preptests (usually missing 3 to 6 per section) prior to finally buying the LGB. After working through the bible one day I was down to missing 0 to 2 on LG's from PT 40-53 (and finished 2 minutes early on June 2008 LG).

The section went from being my worst section pre-LGB to being my best section a few days later post-LGB.

Stephcope's method sounds somewhat like the numbertwopencil.net method. Which, in the end, didn't help me much. Still, if it works for her (or for anyone else) then thats great.


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Re: Logic Games by Type and Question
« Reply #16 on: June 23, 2008, 07:43:52 PM »
The reason powerscore says to rewrite your diagram is so that if you've done work on a question, you can re-use it on a later question. This is really helpful in some cases in cutting down on time. I work similarly to you and the way LSAThell commented, in that you essentially memorize the rules and don't have to look at them everytime. I actually do a combination of writing out re-diagramming on individual questions and working off of my master diagram. Meh. Whatever works.

Re: Logic Games by Type and Question
« Reply #17 on: June 23, 2008, 07:48:32 PM »


it's not crap, and it's not absurd.  once i started doing it that way, i never missed another logic game again.


You know what, I actually believed you before.
But now, I'm not so sure that you're even a person who's able to finish a games section on time.
Have you even read the LGB????
And don't start throwing insults my way again just because I disagree with you. 
I don't respond to drivel.
And frankly, arguing on the internet is for idiots.

Re: Logic Games by Type and Question
« Reply #18 on: June 24, 2008, 07:31:00 PM »


it's not crap, and it's not absurd.  once i started doing it that way, i never missed another logic game again.


You know what, I actually believed you before.
But now, I'm not so sure that you're even a person who's able to finish a games section on time.
Have you even read the LGB????
And don't start throwing insults my way again just because I disagree with you. 
I don't respond to drivel.
And frankly, arguing on the internet is for idiots.

When has she insulted you? 

I don't know what the hell everyone has up their ass in this thread, but this Steph person is receiving flack for no apparent reason.  If you don't like her advice, MOVE ON.  Also, treating the freaking Powerscore texts as some sort of authoritative masterwork is ludicrous.  Some of you need to get it through your thick skulls that Powerscore's methods do not work for everyone.  Christ, why the hell do I even need to explain this to some of you?

Re: Logic Games by Type and Question
« Reply #19 on: June 24, 2008, 09:04:06 PM »
And frankly, arguing on the internet is for idiots.
I'm confused.  Why are we here then?