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Author Topic: What did you do with post-case questions in your casebook?  (Read 459 times)

O.

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What did you do with post-case questions in your casebook?
« on: June 17, 2008, 07:02:03 PM »
 ???

I was looking through a loaned family law casebook, and he answered most of the questions.  They're usually of the "why did Judge X decide this way?  what Texas rule is most relevant to blank?" variety.

More importantly, what did you usually take out of your cases?  I plan to take five or six sentences of notes for each, without briefing.

StudentUVA

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Re: What did you do with post-case questions in your casebook?
« Reply #1 on: June 17, 2008, 10:10:54 PM »
I wouldn't worry about casebook questions, they are usually too vague and too hard at times. Hell, dont worry about cases. Most of the time you need to know a sentence or two about the essential holding. Nothing more is needed, because you will pretty much never get a question about the facts of the case, or the reasoning per se. I was top 5% my first semester (still waiting for grades now) and to be honest, casebook studying took up probably 10% of my time depending on the cold calling system. If we had no cold calls, i would skim over cases really fast and would read about them in hornbooks to get a better idea.

Looking back at some specific classes. In torts our prof assigned the entire casebook cover to cover. I maybe read for the first few weeks and then stopped entirely. I got an A on the exam, the highest grade he gave out that semester. Same with Civ Pro. I got called on once, didn't know what the hell the facts of the case were about, looked like an idiot to everyone else... still got an A, again the highest grade given. Contracts was different because we had tough cold calls, but even then i stopped reading once our prof stopped calling. Again, got an A. I think you can get the idea... I think the only class where I think you need to read cases is Con Law, and even there you can go buy reading hornbooks and case summaries.

To be clear, i'm not saying blow off class and cases. I knew all the major cases, knew all the holdings and the arguments given. The only thing is that i read about them in a time saving manner- in hornbooks and etc. Anyhow, my 2 cent.

skeeball

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Re: What did you do with post-case questions in your casebook?
« Reply #2 on: June 17, 2008, 10:18:13 PM »
Depends on the casebook. My civ pro prof cold-called on people with the post-case questions, and it was a good way of preparing for class. If the questions are well written it's a good way to study.

But if they're the kind of questions that are really 5 questions mashed together in one paragraph, I just tried to figure out what the casebook authors were getting at then moved on...

StudentUVA

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Re: What did you do with post-case questions in your casebook?
« Reply #3 on: June 17, 2008, 10:20:34 PM »
Picking UVa over CLS was probably the best decision you've ever made.  Amazing grades.  How did you do it?  Should we expect to see you on SCOTUS in a few years?   :P
I'm kind of refraining from giving too much advice now, because i'm waiting for my second semester grades, because if i effed up, then my advice is not worth all that much. Thus far i only got Con Law, and managed to get an A-.

But i'll post some more concrete advice later. In brief, i relied on hornbooks, Examples and Explanations, and lots of practice tests. Ended up with  something a little over 3.85 my first semester. It took a lot of work, but i think it's doable. I'm not that smart or that hard working...