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Author Topic: Splitter Questions  (Read 2312 times)

Ninja1

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Re: Splitter Questions
« Reply #10 on: June 17, 2008, 11:40:46 PM »
Spam the top 20, you'll get a hit somewhere with a good enough LSAT. All you need is 1.

I think you do get some extra love from adcomms if you apply early, but not much and not necessarily. Each school treats it differently. Some just camp on applications until January and don't do anything special if you applied early while others start admitting almost as soon as they start taking apps and are more "adventurous" with some of their spots early on.

Also, sometimes places will hold on making any sort of decision until they see your fall grades. That might come up.

Oh, and your highly unprestigious UG probably won't be a problem, trust me. ;)
I'mma stay bumpin' till I bump my head on my tomb.

Snowdrifter

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Re: Splitter Questions
« Reply #11 on: June 17, 2008, 11:51:46 PM »
Oh, and your highly unprestigious UG probably won't be a problem, trust me. ;)

What's wrong with the University of Colorado?

bloomlaw

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Re: Splitter Questions
« Reply #12 on: June 17, 2008, 11:52:24 PM »
\

In regards to Bloomlaw's comments:

- So there does seem to be conclusive opinion that the admissions councils are more lenient earlier in the cycle? possibly because they have more spots?

In my opinion, this occurs because early in the cycle, they see a decent students with a good app, with numbers that work for them, and they don't really have a reason to reject you, so they accept you. After they have went through a couple rounds of applications, they look at the holes they have to fill in their student number averages, and try to correct this. At this time, they are probably less lenient in allowing the average student in, you would need something to differentiate you and make you worth it numbers wise, like a high lsat, but a student like you or me would also have the severe GPA factor. For a splitter, in the earlier cycles, they tend to see the high lsat much more prominently than the low gpa. But that's just a guess. Anyone with more info?

Also, I'm taking the semester off from work (have money saved up) and taking 21 credit hours, so that's how I'll be able to raise it from 2.84 to 3.0 (already ran the math :D ), but then I wouldn't be applying until December...isn't that getting a bit late?
That's the question you have to answer. An Earlier application provides distinct advantages. A higher gpa provides distinct advantages. Which set of positives are greater, and in your position, which is the better choice?


Any tips on how to spruce up an application if you're a splitter? I'm guessing that I want to emphasize my potential to succeed in law school, and tone down my freshman year F's as much as possible...

I talked to a couple splitters from this cycle on LSN, and they said one good thing was to write school specific essays for every school you attend. I'm gonna try that, but I'm also writing my essay on a rough patch I had sophomore year of college. The main point is that I fought through it, but it also affected my grades, and I'm definitely touching on that in the essay.

Ninja1

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Re: Splitter Questions
« Reply #13 on: June 18, 2008, 12:51:32 AM »
Oh, and your highly unprestigious UG probably won't be a problem, trust me. ;)

What's wrong with the University of Colorado?

Nothing, it's tongue-in-cheek. Your school is excellent, don't worry. Actually, it could help. Law schools, especially ones that like to be considered national in reach, like to have "geographic diversity" in their students. That whole "we have students from 119 colleges, 42 states, and 9 foreign nations" line that crops up in everyone's materials.
I'mma stay bumpin' till I bump my head on my tomb.

Samson, B.

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Re: Splitter Questions
« Reply #14 on: June 19, 2008, 01:28:26 PM »
I'd imagine you'd basically be a lock for WUSTL (t20), and might get some love from either Georgetown or NU if you're lucky.
Vanderbilt University Law School Class of 2011 (and proud!)

sevinkimpson

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Re: Splitter Questions
« Reply #15 on: July 07, 2008, 12:29:01 PM »
I'm chiming in because I am in the actual situation that the OP is hoping to be in. 175, 2.5- and I am also wondering about waiting for fall grades. Since I was teetering on expulsion after my freshman year, my grades have been solid and another semester would get me up to about a 2.75. Is that even better than a 2.5, or is it all the same once you get below 3.0?

Also,
1)How do I get schools to ignore my GPA and look at my upward trend and LSAT, and
2)What's the highest up the rankings I can go?

Thanks, and to the OP, go for that great score- it's all that's keeping me in the game.

Snowdrifter

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Re: Splitter Questions
« Reply #16 on: July 12, 2008, 01:26:29 PM »
I am wondering the same thing, Sevin-

What is a good strategy to get schools to focus on your last 2 years, and less on your initial freshman/sophomore troubles?

vjm

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Re: Splitter Questions
« Reply #17 on: July 12, 2008, 01:33:12 PM »
Well, if you have some sort of legit reason (health, death in the family, etc) you can write a short addendum to explain.

If it was just a matter of adjusting to college/ not working hard enough/ partying too much you can write a PS that subtly emphasis your maturity and growth from that period i your life. Don't highlight a flaw, but do your best to communicate how different you are now and provide examples.


Ninja1

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Re: Splitter Questions
« Reply #18 on: July 12, 2008, 10:12:08 PM »
Remember, you might be able to get schools to consider that you have improved since early academic troubles, but it's almost impossible to get them to look past your GPA, whatever it may be. The best outcome in these sorts of situations seems to be that a school will eat a bad GPA to get a killer LSAT. Of course, it's pretty random who will and won't do that.
I'mma stay bumpin' till I bump my head on my tomb.