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Author Topic: LSAT Analog Watch Tip  (Read 5566 times)

HYSHopeful

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LSAT Analog Watch Tip
« on: June 09, 2008, 02:39:51 PM »
SUMMARY: For the best LSAT watch, get an analog watch with a rotating bezel (like this one)... then all you have to do is line the 0 on the bezel up with the minute hand when each section begins, and you have an easy, visual, reference to see exactly where you are within the 35 minutes.

I thought I'd share a tip that I've found to be very helpful.

When I first began studying for the LSAT, I used a cheap analog wristwatch that I had lying around the house.

I would start my LSAT timer, make a mental note of the time that the test would be up (or would write down the start/stop times on the first page of the section) and would refer to my watch at various points throughout the test to ensure that I was properly pacing myself.

Unfortunately, there were times during the test when (in the heat of things) I would forget exactly when the test would be ending. At that point, I either had to take a few seconds and recall when it began, or take a moment to flip back to the front of the section where I often recorded the start and stop times. Either way, I would have to break my concentration for at least 5 or 10 seconds in order to regain a sense of timing.

In addition, It always took a few seconds for me to get a sense of where, on my watch, the 8:45, 17:30, 26:15 marks were.

Serendipitously, I lost the watch that I had been using, and borrowed my girlfriend's watch to take a test. I may have felt a bit emasculated using such a girly watch, but I immediately fell in love with a feature that this watch had: The bezel turns, and all you have to do is line the 0 on the bezel up with the minute hand at the point that the test begins, and you have an easy, visual, reference to see exactly where you are within the 35 minutes.

Since I didn't want to take a pink watch with me to the testing center on test day, I purchased a Casio for around $20 with the same turning bezel feature as my new LSAT watch: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005JVP0FU

This LSAT watch has been my best friend ever since. I was able to make marks at the 8:45, 17:30, 26:15 for additional reference points on the bezel. I've found it be to very helpful. It is one less thing that I have to think about during the test, and helps me make sure that I never lose a sense of proper pacing.

If you don't own a watch with a turning bezel, I would highly suggest finding one ASAP, and getting used to using it before test day.

More LSAT watch tips here.

authority11

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Re: LSAT Analog Watch Tip
« Reply #1 on: June 09, 2008, 03:42:20 PM »
All I do is set my watch to the :25 of the hour at the beginning of each section.

non parata est

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Re: LSAT Analog Watch Tip
« Reply #2 on: June 09, 2008, 04:13:29 PM »
All I do is set my watch to the :25 of the hour at the beginning of each section.

One problem I've heard with this is that you don't always have time to set it back between sections.
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sunnykate

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Re: LSAT Analog Watch Tip
« Reply #3 on: June 09, 2008, 04:34:14 PM »
All I do is set my watch to the :25 of the hour at the beginning of each section.

One problem I've heard with this is that you don't always have time to set it back between sections.

Simple solution to this: when the proctor asks if there are any questions, raise your hand and ask, "Will you give us enough time between sections to reset out watches?"  They will say yes.  But don't forget to ask.  And everyone will (silently) thank you.

limegreen

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Re: LSAT Analog Watch Tip
« Reply #4 on: June 09, 2008, 04:50:11 PM »
I set my watch at 12:00 at the beginning of each section so it counts up.  It makes me a lot less nervous going that way than if it was counting down and since I've been practicing that way I intuitively know where I should be at the end of each game/RC/page of LR.  It only takes a couple of seconds to reset it so it shouldn't be a big issue.  I'd rather lose 5 seconds (if necessary) to have an accurate timer than be trying to do the math of how many minutes are left based solely on the time.

HYSHopeful

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Re: LSAT Analog Watch Tip
« Reply #5 on: June 09, 2008, 06:13:02 PM »
Quote
One problem I've heard with this is that you don't always have time to set it back between sections.

The moving bezel method is a bit quicker than resetting to 12 (though admittedly only by a second or two), and also doesn't allow for the mistake of forgetting to push the dial back in the dial and begin the time.

Talk Is Cheap

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Re: LSAT Analog Watch Tip
« Reply #6 on: June 22, 2008, 10:37:18 PM »
Any watch with a rotating uni-directional ("countdown") bezel will be your best bet.

We can thank the pioneers of the scuba diving watch for this ingenious invention.

However, when the first modern dive watch appeared in 1953, the Blancpain Fifty Fathoms, the original version had a BI-directional rotating bezel. You had to lift it up from a clasp to turn it.

When Rolex introduced their Submariner model shortly thereafter, the unidirectional bezel was included. This made much more sense for diving, since one used the countdown bezel to determine how much air one had remaining. If you accidentally bumped your watch on some underwater obstruction, on a unidirectional bezel, this error could only make it appear that you had LESS time available, thus saving your life. A bidirectional bezel could have potentially be knocked clockwise and thus making it appear you had more time available than you actually had air for.

And thus the glorious history of horology is now connected to our beloved LSAT. I hope this has been informative and enjoyable for you all, although perhaps not entirely applicable to your everyday lives. Unless, of course, you're moonlighting as a master diver for COMEX in between studying for the LSAT.

meggo

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Re: LSAT Analog Watch Tip
« Reply #7 on: June 23, 2008, 12:22:19 AM »
That actually is interesting, though thus far pointless to my life. Though it's the sort of fact I would offhandedly mention to my dad and he would launch into a 30 minute chat about diving, the history of it, the history of watches with scuba diving, what people did before they had watches, and how he likes to use his watch while scuba diving.

As I said in another thread, I asked the proctor she would give us enough time between sections to reset our watches and she was kind of rude about how she answered (I don't think she properly understood what I was asking) and when I clarified she was just like 'no, you only have the time that it takes for me to read what i have in front of me'. A simple 'I have to read a paragraph and that time should suffice' would have been nicer but ah well what can you do.

vjm

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Re: LSAT Analog Watch Tip
« Reply #8 on: June 23, 2008, 12:25:13 AM »
You have enough time to set your watch. With a bit to spare.

drupito

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Re: LSAT Analog Watch Tip
« Reply #9 on: June 23, 2008, 01:28:32 PM »
This is a good topic.  I got messed-up on the LSAT with my watch.  I should have asked for enough time to reset my watch because I didn't have close to enough to do so in my admin.
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