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Author Topic: Summer Prep  (Read 7447 times)

Pauly680

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Re: Summer Prep
« Reply #10 on: June 08, 2008, 11:58:00 AM »
UF ,

I have How to do well on law school exams , ill probably get around to reading it next week . Good to know you found it helpful !! Thanks !!

Jacy ,

What would you suggest would do me an iota of good ?? Not being sarcastic....id just like to know your opinion

Thanks

jeffislouie

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Re: Summer Prep
« Reply #11 on: June 08, 2008, 12:26:33 PM »
I have been reading a book recommended by my school, which is okay: Law School Without Fear (by the Shapos (first names escape me now).  It can be boring and VERY basic sometimes, but it has helped to calm my nerves and I think I will actually use some of the advice.  Also, I read Law School Confidential and it has some good suggestions for studying, briefing, etc.

I tried to do some CALI lessons online, but there's really no point, since I have no idea what they are talking about yet!!! But, as far as actual substantive reading on subjects, I tend to think others, like jeffislouie, have the right idea.  It seems counterproductive.

BUT- I got an AP Prep book on economics and it is good stuff.  It is kind of blah, but for a philosophy major, like me, it helps put a different spin on things.  Also, I hear that economics is a good foundation to have for Torts, and that since economic issues underlie a lot of policy, it helps to be fresh with it.

Just a note- I spend a lot of time at the pool swimming, because much of the advice I've gotten suggests starting an exercise regime if you do not already have one!!!  :)

That book (Law school without fear) is by far the worst thing I've ever read.  My law school made it a requirement.  It stinks.  Poorly written, it doesn't tell you much of anything while claiming to be this fantastic tool.  It's crap.  Written by two lawyers (law profs? not sure anymore) with an inflated sense of self.  I hate that book.
Starting an excercise routine is an excellent idea.  Develop that habit now or you'll get rounder.  Or skinnier.
Justice is tangy....

jeffislouie

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Re: Summer Prep
« Reply #12 on: June 08, 2008, 12:44:12 PM »
Jeff ,

Im not trying to be "that guy " in class . I was never the hand raising type and def not a know it all in High School or College , so I cant imagine that changing in law school . Im just trying to come in ahead of the game and maybe save myself a little bit of time while in school by prepping before it .

What year are you in school ? Did you prep before you went and did you find it didnt help you at all ?

Hey, I totally get it.  The question becomes: to what end.  What did I do the summer before law school?  Well, I was a spring start so that doesn't really count.  BUT, I was doing well enough to quit my full time job in my former career 60 days out, so I had a bit of a mini-summer (that was a fine year for sales).  What I did was, in my opinion, dead wrong. 
I read:
-law school confidential
-getting to maybe
-One L
- Law school without fear
I found XOXO and LSD, lawschoolblogger.com, boyinsuit.com, 4lawschool.com, jollylawger.com, etc. etc. etc. and sat in front of my computer watching youtube video's to try and get a sense of what school was going to be like.  I went and bought a copy of the Paper Chase, rented devil's advocate, the rainmaker, and any other legal movies I could find.  I bought Boston Legal seasons one and two (I would have done that anyway).  I read whatever I could about the law, practicing the law, learning about the law, studying for the law, etc.  And you know what good it did me?  None.  I wasted 2 months obsessing over something which made me a little fearful and a little apprehensive.
Then orientation started.  Day one, everyone was quiet and afraid to speak to each other.  By day 2, some of us started introducing ourselves to each other.  On the last day, we had our outing and some of us spoke.  A week later classes started.  There are some different things you are going to be feeling.  You'll want to be alert, so much information is going to be coming your way and you are going to be worrying about how to accomplish your goal of learning as much as you can and doing the best you can.
You will be overwhelmed.  Then things will pick up and you'll feel like you are reading more than ever before and working harder than you ever have.  A few weeks later, you'll think 'did the workload just ease up or am I getting better at this?'  followed immediately by 'Am I slacking off?'  You will find yourself frustrated and behind in at least one class, wondering what you can do to catch up.
During the course of the semester you will be called on in class and asked to discuss a case or concept in front of the others in your class.  This doesn't SOUND too bad, but that first time is usually the most terrifying thing about being a One L.  You have to stand up, usually, and everyone in class is watching.  You will expose your intelligence and preparation level to everyone for the first time.  You cannot hide from it.  The first time, you are likely to say the wrong thing, make a ton of mistakes, and possibly even misinterpret the law.  The important thing to remember is: don't worry, other people got it wrong too.  That's the process of learning the law - mistakes, errors, and misinterpretations spark learning through proper application of the socratic method.
Suddenly, you'll find yourself realizing that you don't think the same.  When you watch Judge Judy, you'll be infuriated when they use the word 'assault' instead of the word 'battery'.  When you watch Boston Legal, you'll find yourself trying to see if what you are watching may be grounds for an IIED claim.
The best thing, for you, is to relaxificate yourself.  Put all the law school crap that you think is going to help you to the side and enjoy your damn summer!  The ride is going to begin in the fall and it's going to be the same ride if you ruin your summer, just with more regret.
Good luck.  if you are anything like me, you'll ignore the advice I offered you and obsess anyway!
 ;D
Justice is tangy....

jacy85

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Re: Summer Prep
« Reply #13 on: June 08, 2008, 12:57:48 PM »

Jacy ,

What would you suggest would do me an iota of good ?? Not being sarcastic....id just like to know your opinion

Thanks

Exactly what I said - learning how to network, beginning to make contacts, and coming up with a game plan for the job search, which begins for 1Ls Dec. 1 for big firms.

Reading the book I recommended will do you far more good, IMO, with starting all of that, and that is a far more productive use of your time than prepping as recommended in PLS and reading substantive law.

philosophia

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Re: Summer Prep
« Reply #14 on: June 08, 2008, 01:12:00 PM »
I have been reading a book recommended by my school, which is okay: Law School Without Fear (by the Shapos (first names escape me now).  It can be boring and VERY basic sometimes, but it has helped to calm my nerves and I think I will actually use some of the advice.  Also, I read Law School Confidential and it has some good suggestions for studying, briefing, etc.

I tried to do some CALI lessons online, but there's really no point, since I have no idea what they are talking about yet!!! But, as far as actual substantive reading on subjects, I tend to think others, like jeffislouie, have the right idea.  It seems counterproductive.

BUT- I got an AP Prep book on economics and it is good stuff.  It is kind of blah, but for a philosophy major, like me, it helps put a different spin on things.  Also, I hear that economics is a good foundation to have for Torts, and that since economic issues underlie a lot of policy, it helps to be fresh with it.

Just a note- I spend a lot of time at the pool swimming, because much of the advice I've gotten suggests starting an exercise regime if you do not already have one!!!  :)

That book (Law school without fear) is by far the worst thing I've ever read.  My law school made it a requirement.  It stinks.  Poorly written, it doesn't tell you much of anything while claiming to be this fantastic tool.  It's crap.  Written by two lawyers (law profs? not sure anymore) with an inflated sense of self.  I hate that book.
Starting an excercise routine is an excellent idea.  Develop that habit now or you'll get rounder.  Or skinnier.

I didn't think it was THAT BAD, but I did skip a lot of it. I would be pissed if I had spent more than $6 for it, though.

I wouldn't mind the skinnier of the two, myself...

Jhuen_the_bird

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Re: Summer Prep
« Reply #15 on: June 15, 2008, 10:20:12 AM »
Take all of those "guides to law school" books w/ a grain of salt - they were definitely all written by gunners who didn't have lives (ever - but especially in law school).  Those books will just scare you into thinking you need to study 8 hours a day.  You can read them, and some of the tips/etc are helpful, but don't get overwhelmed.

I mean ... I probably was in the bottom 20% as far as "time spent studying" goes ... but grade-wise I'm in the top 30% ... go figure.

The Artist

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Re: Summer Prep
« Reply #16 on: June 15, 2008, 01:56:36 PM »
tag

dinsosaur junior

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Re: Summer Prep
« Reply #17 on: June 18, 2008, 09:58:44 AM »

I agree with enjoying your summer. I decided to go to law school 2 weeks before orientation. Not I decided which school to attend, but I decided to go at all. I had deferred, etc. Anyway. I obviously only had time to quit my job and move.

That's not good advice, as I went in feeling so stressed.

But I think the best thing to do is mentally prepare. What do you want out of school? Why are you going? The one thing I did do was write a few paragraphs about why I am going to law school. During the semester, when things got overwhelming, stressful, awful, etc., I would pull it out and remind myself why I decided to do this in the first place. It helped kept things in perspective. That's so important, I believe, in the 1L year.

It wasn't my "personal statement" that I used to apply, but just some rather garbled paragraphs, stream of consciousness style, etc.

Not saying you should do that--but again, my advice is going in with a clear sense of who YOU are and what YOU want. I never read any of the books others have read, and I did very well in school.


upgrade

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Re: Summer Prep
« Reply #18 on: June 19, 2008, 11:09:44 PM »
Most of the current students I have talked to have told me that they, after a few weeks, learned to read a supplement to understand the black letter law prior to reading the assigned cases so that they understood what was happening.  The supplements suggested have ranged from commercial outlines to E&Es to hornbooks. 

I visited several schools and sat in on classes at most of them..  I don't recall the black letter law being explained in any of the sessions.  The discussion revolved almost entirely on application.  The impression I got was that the students were expected to already know the elements that compose the black letter law on the topic to be discussed and should come to class expecting to focus on the finer details and ambiguities.  Is this generally the case?  If so, I'm not understanding how a student will be harmed by reading the basic elements of what constitutes tort x ahead of time.  If the bulk of these topics are not going to be explained, just applied, how is waiting until the first day of class going to be any different than reading the material a few months ahead of time? 

The Artist

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Re: Summer Prep
« Reply #19 on: June 19, 2008, 11:17:03 PM »
Most of the current students I have talked to have told me that they, after a few weeks, learned to read a supplement to understand the black letter law prior to reading the assigned cases so that they understood what was happening.  The supplements suggested have ranged from commercial outlines to E&Es to hornbooks. 

I visited several schools and sat in on classes at most of them..  I don't recall the black letter law being explained in any of the sessions.  The discussion revolved almost entirely on application.  The impression I got was that the students were expected to already know the elements that compose the black letter law on the topic to be discussed and should come to class expecting to focus on the finer details and ambiguities.  Is this generally the case?  If so, I'm not understanding how a student will be harmed by reading the basic elements of what constitutes tort x ahead of time.  If the bulk of these topics are not going to be explained, just applied, how is waiting until the first day of class going to be any different than reading the material a few months ahead of time? 

My thought process exactly.

And the burnout argument is bogus, because nobody is going to spend 10 hours a day everyday studying over the summer. Heck, there isn't even enough material for them to do that! A few hours a week won't hurt anyone and its actually kinda fun.