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Author Topic: Shift in LSAT difficulty  (Read 2405 times)

sevinkimpson

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Shift in LSAT difficulty
« on: June 04, 2008, 01:47:03 AM »
In preparing for the June test, I began by completing the original 10 actual official LSATs book, and will now lead up to test day with the tests from 10 more actual official LSATs. I have read in several places that the logic games of the mid 90s are more difficult than those currently used.

1) How much truth is there to this, and to what extent will the tests that I have been practicing with affect my June LG performance?

2) Is there a shift in the other sections as well? Does a solid LR and RC performance tests in the 90s mean good things for this year?

I just don't want to be blindsided and perform lower than my expectations because I am taking the wrong tests. Any feedback would be appreciated.

Nervous Wreck

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Re: Shift in LSAT difficulty
« Reply #1 on: June 04, 2008, 01:49:48 AM »
From what I've read/experienced, the LG sections are definitely getting easier, but the LR and RC are getting harder.  I did much better on my mid-1990s practice tests than I've been doing on the more recent ones... Here's hoping that changes in the next two weeks--or else I'll be holding off on it until October.

sevinkimpson

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Re: Shift in LSAT difficulty
« Reply #2 on: June 04, 2008, 01:51:46 AM »
Bah- that's sort of what I feared. Is there any way to counter that without actually buying each of the most recent prep tests individually (beside just lowering expectations)?

Nervous Wreck

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Re: Shift in LSAT difficulty
« Reply #3 on: June 04, 2008, 01:57:07 AM »
Bah- that's sort of what I feared. Is there any way to counter that without actually buying each of the most recent prep tests individually (beside just lowering expectations)?

I wish I could help, but I'm pretty much just as clueless as you are.  I'm sure someone else will take note of this thread and help out, though.

mbw

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Re: Shift in LSAT difficulty
« Reply #4 on: June 04, 2008, 02:30:09 AM »
Bah- that's sort of what I feared. Is there any way to counter that without actually buying each of the most recent prep tests individually (beside just lowering expectations)?

No, you'll need to buy them, especially 44 - 51.  Plus, you'll need to get a hold of Sept and Dec 2007, as they have their own flukes.

I just spent the day doing all the games from tests 29 - 39.  I disagree that they're all that much easier than recent tests - just different.  The most important thing is not getting flustered and spending the time to get ALL the inferences.  You miss an inference, and you blow a game on the recent tests.

I don't think the more recent RC's were all that much more difficult than in the 1990s.  Again, the questions were different, but the material actually a bit less dense.
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Re: Shift in LSAT difficulty
« Reply #5 on: June 04, 2008, 05:18:16 AM »
In preparing for the June test, I began by completing the original 10 actual official LSATs book, and will now lead up to test day with the tests from 10 more actual official LSATs. I have read in several places that the logic games of the mid 90s are more difficult than those currently used.

1) How much truth is there to this, and to what extent will the tests that I have been practicing with affect my June LG performance?

2) Is there a shift in the other sections as well? Does a solid LR and RC performance tests in the 90s mean good things for this year?

I just don't want to be blindsided and perform lower than my expectations because I am taking the wrong tests. Any feedback would be appreciated.

Wikipedia claims that in 2004-2005, the logic games section became slightly "easier" (HA!) and the reading comprehension section became slightly harder.

Based on my own experience looking at test prep stuff, I would say that the LSAT is definitely becoming harder overall as time goes on. I find tests from the mid to late 1990s to be a lot easier than more recent tests. As an example, I had a friend that did almost all of her test prep on older (like mid '90s) LSATs, constantly got scores of 160+, and then got a 148 and a 152 on real LSATs.

If I were you, I would get the most recent tests available.
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Re: Shift in LSAT difficulty
« Reply #6 on: June 04, 2008, 05:54:19 AM »
I've only taken one of the eight most recent tests, but in comparing tests from the early- and mid-90s to those from 2000 to 2003 or thereabouts, the logic games seem slightly easier as of late. It seems like there are some game set-ups that were used back in the day that aren't anymore. I don't notice much of a difference between the args or RC sections, but that's probably because those sections don't give me any trouble at all, mid-90s or recent.
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Julie Fern

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Re: Shift in LSAT difficulty
« Reply #7 on: June 04, 2008, 08:45:30 AM »
june test be hardest ever.

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Re: Shift in LSAT difficulty
« Reply #8 on: June 05, 2008, 01:27:50 AM »
Hand-wringing over minute changes in the test is a waste of time and energy.  Learn to set up games.  Learn to make deductions.  Learn to analyze args.  Learn to work questions efficiently.  The test tests the same skills as it did a decade ago. 

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Re: Shift in LSAT difficulty
« Reply #9 on: June 05, 2008, 01:37:34 AM »
Hand-wringing over minute changes in the test is a waste of time and energy.  Learn to set up games.  Learn to make deductions.  Learn to analyze args.  Learn to work questions efficiently.  The test tests the same skills as it did a decade ago. 

Ditto
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