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Author Topic: My Dilemma - Whats the Best Plan?  (Read 1324 times)

ace0260

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My Dilemma - Whats the Best Plan?
« on: May 10, 2008, 11:50:54 PM »
So far Im considering doing a Testmasters course that begins July 12th for the Oct LSAT. Problem is that I have alot of time between now and then to study, and I feel that I would be wasting this time by waiting two months. As far as I understand, its not advisable to study for the LSAT before a prepcourse. Should I not bother with the prepcourse at all and buy powerscore books to study myself? (i hear powerscore books are alot better than TM). I would greatly appreciate any suggestions concerning the best plan in my situation.

EarlCat

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Re: My Dilemma - Whats the Best Plan?
« Reply #1 on: May 11, 2008, 01:51:23 PM »
Is there not an earlier class?

ace0260

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Re: My Dilemma - Whats the Best Plan?
« Reply #2 on: May 11, 2008, 05:42:49 PM »
There is a class that begins 2-3 weeks before July 12th but it runs one class a week on Saturdays which is not doable for me. Powerscore also only offers classes that begin in mid July.

EarlCat

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Re: My Dilemma - Whats the Best Plan?
« Reply #3 on: May 11, 2008, 05:49:32 PM »
If you simply can't wait, I'd find a tutor to get you started before the class or perhaps instead of the class.  (If you do the class, I'd try to get a tutor who uses the same methods so there's no problem synthesizing two different approaches).   I don't like self-study personally because a book won't point out when you form a bad habit.

tcwhat

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Re: My Dilemma - Whats the Best Plan?
« Reply #4 on: May 11, 2008, 07:53:46 PM »
If you're going to study beforehand, I would recommend against using any real LSAT questions because TM organizes and orders them to make it easy to learn all the concepts and strategies. Also, they give a dozen or so full-length LSATs as diagnostic tests, so you don't want to see any of those questions before you take the diags.

You would prefer that they use fabricated questions?

I don't see how that is good advice at all.

EarlCat

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Re: My Dilemma - Whats the Best Plan?
« Reply #5 on: May 12, 2008, 12:44:06 PM »
No, I didn't mean to imply that. Studying with fake questions is the worst of all options.
If you're going to study beforehand, I would recommend against using any real LSAT questions

So what should they should study with?

Quote
because TM organizes and orders them to make it easy to learn all the concepts and strategies. Also, they give a dozen or so full-length LSATs as diagnostic tests, so you don't want to see any of those questions before you take the diags.

Earlcat, I reposted this since you locked the other thread right after getting the last word. Also, I disagree that it's okay to see the classroom examples beforehand. That's how a lot of students pick up bad habits. The point of the class is to learn the strategies and methods before you do the questions.

Meh.  Repeating questions is one of the most valuable ways you can spend your study time.  Working the first time, students are mostly concerned with getting the right answer (which won't help on the real test since that question won't show up again).  The 2nd and 3rd time, they're concerned with how to get to the answer, and how to get there most efficiently.  Yes, studying without a good instructor to slap you around has the potential for creating bad habits, but if someone is going to do it, I'd rather use real questions than fake ones.  As I said in the other thread, I'd just make doubly sure not to use any questions from a preptest that was going to be used as a diagnostic.

dactylion

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Re: My Dilemma - Whats the Best Plan?
« Reply #6 on: May 12, 2008, 06:23:04 PM »
I'm in the same dilemma...what do people think about reading the LGB/LRB while waiting for the class to start?

WashLaw

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Re: My Dilemma - Whats the Best Plan?
« Reply #7 on: June 12, 2008, 10:09:12 PM »
*Bump*
I'm in the same situation but taking a PS class starting Aug. 11. Read the LGB. Should I get the LRB as well?

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Re: My Dilemma - Whats the Best Plan?
« Reply #8 on: June 13, 2008, 12:13:41 AM »
It's not going to hurt you to read the LGB and LRB beforehand.  Read them as many times as you like.  The more dangerous proposition is taking practice exams.  The concern is that you may develop bad habits, and you don't want to blow through the universe of actual LSAT questions too quickly either.

If you're still chomping at the bit after you get through the LGB and the LRB twice, reading carefully, and you still have plenty of time before your class, then taking a few exams before you start the class isn't going to irreparably harm you, most likely will help you, and should leave you with plenty of material to work through closer to exam time.

As with any self-study program, you want to start off by taking an exam or two without keeping track of time, focusing instead on applying LGB and LRB concepts to the questions.  Once you have taken a couple untimed exams, you should start keeping track of time with your silent timer, while still taking as much time as you need to answer each question.  After having taken 4 or 5 exams in total, note which types of questions you struggle answering both correctly and quickly.  Return to the LGB and LRB to focus on those question types and to relearn and master the appropriate techniques to address them.  Return to the tests, taking them under timed, test-like conditions.  With every test you take, make sure to go through every answer/question and think about both why you got right those you got right as well as why you got the others wrong.

Feel free to contact Admit Experts (contact@admitexperts.com) for more information about designing a self-study program.
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