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Author Topic: diagnostic score versus actual score  (Read 957 times)

pinagham

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diagnostic score versus actual score
« on: May 04, 2008, 01:32:10 AM »
so i've been taking tons of practice tests and scoring about where i would like to score, but i've heard it's common to not do so well with the actual test.  i was wondering if people that have already taken the lsat mind sharing their diagnostic score versus their actual score, whether it was about the same, +2 points, or -8 points.  i'm just curious, maybe for peace of mind or more of a push to study.  thanks for any input!

JeNeSaisLaw

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Re: diagnostic score versus actual score
« Reply #1 on: May 04, 2008, 01:53:53 AM »
My practice average was 2-4 points higher than my real score.
LSN
Vanderbilt Class of 2011

conoroberst

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Re: diagnostic score versus actual score
« Reply #2 on: May 04, 2008, 02:19:37 AM »
First practice test - 158

Practicing range before taking test - 168-174

Test - 169

SuperDude

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Re: diagnostic score versus actual score
« Reply #3 on: May 04, 2008, 02:41:41 AM »
Cold Turkey:  149
Practice Range:  153-167
Actual:  164

What really helped me out was repeatedly taking full practice tests.  That taught me effective time management and question selection skills.  Once I broke the 160 barrier, I never dropped below it.

Blakkout

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Re: diagnostic score versus actual score
« Reply #4 on: May 04, 2008, 08:24:55 PM »
What really helped me out was repeatedly taking full practice tests.  That taught me effective time management and question selection skills.  Once I broke the 160 barrier, I never dropped below it.

That's what kills me sometimes.  I have a terrible time just "letting go" when I hit a problem that I can't get.  It's so hard for me to just forget it and move on.

My first cold Diagnostic was a 158, I'm waiting on the results of my second one after about a month of working on my own.  I would just assume that most diagnostic scores would be higher than the real thing simply because it's hard to make a completely accurate copy of the test.

vjm

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Re: diagnostic score versus actual score
« Reply #5 on: May 04, 2008, 08:27:17 PM »
Range before test: 161- 170 (consistently above 165 for the month before the test)

Actual: 158

RockShox007

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Re: diagnostic score versus actual score
« Reply #6 on: May 04, 2008, 08:33:27 PM »
It really depends on the person... I landed right near my range.  The best advice I got before the actual test was from a really good friend that told me to do everything possible to not be stressed out.  The night before, for some reason, I convinced myself to not stress at all... I woke up in the morning not worried one bit about the test, and things went really smoothly from there on.  IMO, that's what will really determine if your on the top of your range or the bottom.

EarlCat

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Re: diagnostic score versus actual score
« Reply #7 on: May 04, 2008, 11:06:18 PM »
The LSAC officially reports your score as a range.  While you may have gotten a 163 on this test, they say your actual result lies somewhere between 160 and 166.  I think this is with good reason as students at all levels (myself included) test to fluctuate several points.  Unfortunately, schools look at your score, not your range, so a 163 is always better than a 162 in their eyes.  That means you'd better have a really good day.  Luckily, there are things we can do to move our range up and other things we can do to help ensure peak performance on test day.

Here's a post I made a while back about avoiding panic.
http://www.lawschooldiscussion.org/prelaw/index.php/topic,95809.msg2444489.html#msg2444489