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Author Topic: Men: Buying a suit...  (Read 25034 times)

*devo*

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Re: Men: Buying a suit...
« Reply #80 on: June 17, 2008, 12:58:49 PM »

So what's the etiquette on changing the suit, if, for example, you have only a couple/three? Switch them every other day or just wear one for a week or what???


You will want to rotate the suits every day because 1) you will look like a dork if you wear the same suit more than two days in a row and, more importantly, 2) suits will last longer if you give 'em a break after you wear them (it has something to do with the suit fibers).  They say the nicer the suit, the better the quality of the construction, which makes the suit last longer.  They say you should even hang your suits with a few inches of space around them (I don't because I don't have room).  Anyway, I used to work at Nordstrom so I know my stuff.

*devo*

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Re: Men: Buying a suit...
« Reply #81 on: June 17, 2008, 03:18:01 PM »

And as for women, they DO recommend a black suit as an option for your first purchase.


I don't think there's anything wrong with a black suit but I would much prefer a dark gray. In an office setting; a black suit just seems a little heavy to me.  I like gray so much I plan on owning a dark gray and light gray and no black (except for funerals and my James Bond costume).

robelguapo

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Re: Men: Buying a suit...
« Reply #82 on: June 17, 2008, 05:16:23 PM »
ze tag

Thanks AK, great stuff. I had already bought a dark charcoal/subtle pinstrip suit prior to reading all the advice, so I feel pretty good about that! I thought the pinstripes may of been a little too 'varsity' for me, but I think I pull it off. Yes, I'm bad ass like that... ::)

So what's the etiquette on changing the suit, if, for example, you have only a couple/three? Switch them every other day or just wear one for a week or what???


That's exactly why you buy neutral-colored suits: navy, charcoal, black (only for winter and evening wear), slate, etc. A different shirt everyday keeps things looking (and smelling) fresh. A clothes steamer also helps keep things fresh. Steam often, so you don't have to dryclean all the time. Dry cleaning will clean the clothes for sure, but it weakens the fabric.


That's what I was thinking...

and BTW, Real Madrid rules. Arsenal...pfftt.  :P

AmericanGunner

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Re: Men: Buying a suit...
« Reply #83 on: July 09, 2008, 06:10:46 PM »
I will concede that Real Madrid could buy the entire world if they wanted to. I've got nothing against RM, but I'm an Arsenal precisely because they seem to do more with less, so to speak. They are, of course, richer than a Villareal, a Reggina or a Portsmouth, but for the past few seasons under Wenger they've played football that is greater than the sum of its parts.

And in keeping with the theme of the thread, yes, black is always acceptable on women. On men, not always. Yes, hang your suits with space to breathe. But one important detail has been left out so far - CEDAR BLOCKS!

Cedar blocks (or if you've got the trust fund, a cedar-made closet) will keep moths from eating your investment. Moths love wool, but hate the smell and oil of cedar. It's safer than moth balls, too.
"Please stop using obscenities in front of these people, or I'll be forced to thrash you."

_retired_

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Re: Men: Buying a suit...
« Reply #84 on: July 09, 2008, 07:07:10 PM »
I was looking for this thread a while back... damn search function. *tag*

UMKb

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Re: Men: Buying a suit...
« Reply #85 on: July 10, 2008, 11:24:16 AM »
tag.

So what is the standard between skirt vs pant suits for women?

meggo

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Re: Men: Buying a suit...
« Reply #86 on: July 10, 2008, 02:57:59 PM »
I'm not working in a law firm, but I would say I'm fairly well versed in fashion and a bit in men's suiting (though perhaps more the Savile Row/NYC designers). I really agree with the advice for getting a grey suit perhaps as opposed to a black. Black is too heavy and I actually think grey is much better foil for colors than black. A dark slate grey looks great on a lot of skintones and imo, it is that bit more chic than black. Of course black is great, and I wear my fair share of it but if I was just starting to build a suit collection, I probably wouldn't get more than 1 black suit in a row. Other options is a beautiful dark rich navy or deep deep chocolate brown. With these colors, I think it's fine to get something that is almost black in tone, but having it be an almost-black navy or an almost-black brown, you just get a little bit more depth.  Some great mid-priced lines for women, I would recommend Theory. They have great suiting basics in very flattering and on-trend cuts or even Teen Flo. Teen Flo tends to copy a lot of high end designer suiting (like Chanel) but their fabric choices are great so I think that's another good option.

I think it was American Gunner who said dry cleaning weakens the fabric this is so true, especially I find on cheaper fibre like polyester. I would also recommend shoe trees for men and women. They seem like such a waste, but they really make a difference in keeping your shoe shape over time. Men's shoes, obviously you don't have to go for Berluti, but I find this is such an overlooked part of a man's outfit. I love a lot of the men's suit styles over on the Sartorialist, but some of those might be too unconventional for some law firms.

For women, I think obviously a lot of you can figure out how to pair shoes, bags, accessories but if you can't, then less is more. In my opinion, if you can't afford a great leather bag (my personal fav and the one I'm sure will last until after law school, the Yves Saint Lauren Muse in XL) is get something in a pebbled leather. I find, for whatever reason, this really disguises the quality of leather if it's not as high as some others. So many women I see walking around with cheap leather bags in ugly styles and i'm like why?! Just get something in a simple boxy shape with a nice grainy or pebbled leather, and it look 10x more expensive than it was. Shoes - well there are so many options but I don't think something has to be boring or unattractive to be comfortable and there are a lot of great really pretty flats around if you really can't do heels for the office.

My biggest pet peeve with mens suits, and the most obvious way that they look cheap to me, is the hemming. You can see around the bottom edge/hem of the suit or around the back vents, when it bunches or doesn't hang properly. bleurgh.

vjm

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Re: Men: Buying a suit...
« Reply #87 on: July 10, 2008, 03:18:33 PM »
Hey meggo,

Would you mind making a thread addressing women's suits? I know you are the perfect person to ask and frankly, I have questions.

Your post was very helpful, and I am sure all the ladies here would love to pick your brain a little bit about work wear.

no634

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Re: Men: Buying a suit...
« Reply #88 on: July 10, 2008, 06:00:54 PM »
I love a lot of the men's suit styles over on the Sartorialist, but some of those might be too unconventional for some law firms.

I love Sartorialist.  :D

meggo

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Re: Men: Buying a suit...
« Reply #89 on: July 10, 2008, 07:24:23 PM »
yeah sure vjm. Cheers for the compliment.  ;)  I somehow missed the 'men' portion of the thread title!

no - I also love Sart. He got into it really for men's wear and I still think you'll find the best men's wear street style shots there, but if you've in the mood for browsing, another great NYC based street style blog is Alta Mira or in general, Garance Dore. Just to further add my thoughts to this thread, I do think people (probably more men than women) undervalue the importance of a great suit. A lot of people think - they care about my work - what does it matter if I don't look like a stepped out of Vogue Homme, as long as it's acceptable? And this may be true. But a really well dressed man catches everyone's eye and the little details of the suit really make it. People have more trust in someone who is well polished. They look like they can get the job done, like they know what they are doing. So don't undervalue the pyschological aspect. Esp. in big law where you've got a sea of men/women in suits, those little details will I guarantee make you stand out. Little details like proper cuff length, interesting tie knots/shapes, perhaps a sombre suit/shirt/tie with a vivid sock, interesting pocket square or an interesting lapel. Again, depending on the conservativeness of the firm, I'm not saying you have to splash out on Thom Browne, but these little details when put together add up. And I'm sure it's said elsewhere in the thread, but I haven't had a chance to go through it all yet - shoulders shoulders shoulders. This is THE most important part of the suit to get to fit. You can change just about everything else (get sleeves shortened, get it taken in at the sides) but shoulders are the hardest to change and the most important to get right. They set up your frame. If a suit doesn't fit you in the shoulders, I can guarantee it will look cheap. I've seen mean in 4 figure suits and the shoulders don't fit and I think 'what a waste'. Even if you have a small budget, make sure it fits you in the shoulders and you can get the rest altered, sometimes for less than $50 or $100.