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Author Topic: Best Book for Logical Reasoning Section?  (Read 4320 times)

gooooooo

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Best Book for Logical Reasoning Section?
« on: June 18, 2004, 05:36:20 PM »
What is the best book for the LR?  I think the majority of people agree that the LG Bible is the best for logic games and that one's RC section cannot really be improved by using a LSAT book per se.  But I hear that there are some key tricks to the LR section.  Which book best spells it out?

BTW don't say the LR Bible because it's not out yet.

Hazzy

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Re: Best Book for Logical Reasoning Section?
« Reply #1 on: June 18, 2004, 07:00:20 PM »
I think Master the LSAT is the best one I've seen for this.  I'm going to buy the LR Bible when it comes out though...

EnglishToLaw

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Re: Best Book for Logical Reasoning Section?
« Reply #2 on: June 19, 2004, 02:41:07 AM »
For what it's worth, a prelaw adviser (who also teaches philosophy, so she may have a bias) recommended that I review a logic textbook such as Introduction to Logic by Irving M. Copi and Carl Cohen. She said "work through the exercises," but "ignore symbolic reasoning." I've taught critical reasoning courses on the community college level, and from what I can tell most of the logical reasoning questions on the LSAT deal with basic flaws such as non sequitur, circular reasoning, slippery slope, false analogy, and the like. I think PRACTICE and EXPOSURE to many question types is the way to go, but I'm buttressing that kind of review by working through a Princeon Review "Cracking the LSAT" book, studying a Barron's "Pass Key to the LSAT" text, and taking the rather pricey Princeton Review course. I'm taking the October 2 exam, so we'll see if my approach works. ::)

lexie0502

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Re: Best Book for Logical Reasoning Section?
« Reply #3 on: June 19, 2004, 09:05:51 AM »
Hey I agree with EnglishToLaw.  I actually in a summer Intro to Logic course.  It's really helpful as I'm studying for the Oct LSAT as well.  I see a lot of the fallacies that i'm learning about in the course in the LR questions.  I'd pick up a book and work through some of the chapters if i were you.

jacy85

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Re: Best Book for Logical Reasoning Section?
« Reply #4 on: June 19, 2004, 11:54:12 AM »
I've heard from a lot of people with formal logic training, such as the classes you're talking about, actually found them to be more of a hinderance than a help.  If I remember the complaints correctly, they got too bogged down in the formal logic and everything got too convoluted.

cnkis

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Re: Best Book for Logical Reasoning Section?
« Reply #5 on: June 19, 2004, 06:40:58 PM »
I agree, I was an Engineering major and had to take a logic class. I think that it didn't help in the least, the only thing it helped me with is knowing the contrapositive to statements which you could learn in about 5 mins tops. So uh.. nay to the full study of logic.  ;)
Dec LSAT here I come :)

JohnB.

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Re: Best Book for Logical Reasoning Section?
« Reply #6 on: June 19, 2004, 07:15:00 PM »
I also agree with Jacy, I have the Intro to Logic by Copi and I tried to use it in addition to my other lsat prep books, it just confused me. I aslo went out and purchased other books on logic, and that just made me even more confused.


superiorlobe

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Re: Best Book for Logical Reasoning Section?
« Reply #7 on: June 19, 2004, 07:36:30 PM »
I would say that they best practice for logical reasoning (unlike games) are the PrepTests themselves. Buy the book of 10, do a logical reasoning section in as much time as you need, and then check your answers and completely figure out what was wrong with your thinking on the ones that you got wrong.  Some people think that you can argue for one answer against another answer.  You can't.  There are clear correct answers for every case and by re-reading the questions and thinking about it carefully, you can figure it out.  If you can't, ask someone.  Whatever you do, make sure you understand before you move on.  And never get caught in the trap of arguing for your incorrect answer.  You're wrong. They're right.  Figure it out.

Then do it all over again with another logical reasoning section.

By the way, also go over the questions you got right.  Try and remember your reasoning, whether you thought it was a tough question, and which choices looked tempting.  Make sure that you answered it correctly for the right reasons and not by guessing.  Basically just go through each question, whether you got it right or wrong, and make sure you fully understand the reasoning.

Then do it all over again with a third logical reasoning section.

By the time you have done this 20 times you should find your score creeping upward.

The reason you can't do this with games is that diagramming is so important to games and you need to learn strong diagramming skills that are best taught in a games book like the one from PowerScore.  There are also concepts like "interchangeable elements" that you pick up from the external books that can really be lifesavers.

For logical reasoning, though, just practice, review, practice, review, practive, review....

Most people just practice and don't review, which is as bad as not practicing at all, or maybe worse since you could be re-inforcing poor thinking skills.

M2

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Re: Best Book for Logical Reasoning Section?
« Reply #8 on: June 19, 2004, 07:36:33 PM »
Well...my logic class helped a great deal.

Inverse-error...converse-error contrapositive...etc
I had the LR down cold before I ever looked at an LSAT passage.

JiggityJig

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Re: Best Book for Logical Reasoning Section?
« Reply #9 on: June 19, 2004, 08:15:58 PM »
I think it depends at least in part on how much time you have and how much trouble you're having.  Trying to "learn logic for the LSAT" is probably going to be a hindrance and a stress -- but if you have a few months before the LSAT, know it's a problem, and tackle informal logic (*not* symbolic logic, the class with the engineers and comp sci majors!) either in a class or by reading a decent book such that you really have a solid handle on it before returning to practice LSATs in earnest, you'll be in a better position. 

Then again, I felt like Cracking the LSAT's LR section was pretty good, and it requires no previous experience with logic.