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Author Topic: Major Dilemma  (Read 1255 times)

gooooooo

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Major Dilemma
« on: June 17, 2004, 12:43:39 PM »
I am about half way through the LG Bible and so far it has been unbelievably helpful.  I have major problems with the games (getting just 9-12 correct on each section)  which is keeping my score down from my goal of 170.  I only miss 3-5 on RC and LR. 

Before getting the LG Bible, I enrolled in a Princeton Review class that is scheduled to begin on June 22nd.  My motivation for taking this class was mainly to get a strategy for the games as well as get the extra practice from taking 6 proctored exams.  From reading this board and others, though, many people have exclaimed prep courses to be unecessary if you have time, motivation, and the proper resources. 

My question is this, now that the LG Bible has given me a concrete strategy for the games, should I drop out of the PR course to save $1200?  I plan on taking all the preptests on my own if I drop out and I will have no problem studying 5-6 hours a day without the pressure of a course.  I wouldn't mind paying the money, but I'm worried that if PR presents a strategy for diagramming the games that is different that the Powerscore strategy this will confuse me and harm my game ability. 

Would it be viable for me to ignore what PR teaches regarding the games and focus on the LR and RC?  Can I really improve these sections substantially if I am getting merely 3-5 wrong at this point?  Does PR present useful LR and RC techniques for people who are already very strong in those sections? 

Any advice from you guys would be much appreciated as I can't figure out what to do! 

nathanielmark

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Re: Major Dilemma
« Reply #1 on: June 17, 2004, 12:49:51 PM »
PR methods for games will be a step backwards from the LG Bible.  i would reccomend doing as many real games sections as you can until the techniques become second nature (this took time for me). 

i also think LRs are best learned from real LSATs.  RCs im not sure what you can gain other then reading a lot.  i would take a PS or TM class or do self-study.

gooooooo

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Re: Major Dilemma
« Reply #2 on: June 17, 2004, 12:54:38 PM »
Are you saying that PR does not use real LR questions in their course?  What about strategies for these things--like negation etc.  Do they teach that stuff?

nathanielmark

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Re: Major Dilemma
« Reply #3 on: June 17, 2004, 12:57:17 PM »

my humble opinion is that LRs are best learned by doing them and reviewing them and figuring out the ones you got wrong.  I don't think there are any great techniques for them.  I did find some utility, however, with the NOVA MAster the LSAT book.  IMO, a course can help you with staying on track, practice tests, drills, more then actual technique, but some may disagree.

negation seems like a waste of time to me.

Are you saying that PR does not use real LR questions in their course?  What about strategies for these things--like negation etc.  Do they teach that stuff?

gooooooo

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Re: Major Dilemma
« Reply #4 on: June 17, 2004, 01:02:23 PM »
I hear you, thanks for the advice.  I'll look into that Nova book, possibly buy the LR Bible from Powerscore and get all the preptests in lieu of PR.  I really think it may be my best course of action.  Any other opinions would be great to hear though. 

jacy85

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Re: Major Dilemma
« Reply #5 on: June 17, 2004, 01:58:44 PM »
If, closer to the LSAT, you still feel like a course would help, you can look into the powerscore weekend course.  It did a great deal to help hone in on areas I was still having trouble with on my own, was a great refresher for games (i'd also worked through the lg bible before going in) and for $395, I felt it was a great deal.  After the class, my practice scores stabalized around 168/169, which before had been the top of my range.