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"Demonstrated history of poor test taking"

practiceboy02

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Re: "Demonstrated history of poor test taking"
« Reply #10 on: August 05, 2005, 11:29:02 AM »
But isn't your application itself already the "why you should accept me" part?  It seems entirely redundant (and kind of whiny/making excuses) to say "You should accept me despite my sub-par LSAT score because of the rest of my file."

I don't think it's whiny at all to say, "You asked for a full picture of me, and so I am presenting it." 

I mean, if they wanted to see only your LSAT and GPA, that's all they would ask for, and no one would be writing any personal statements, nor would we need LORs.

They are asking for a full picture--I see nothing wrong with giving it to them.

But they KNOW your LSAT score is low and that your GPA is high.  It's rather obvious.  Why point it out to them in an addendum?  Ultimately it's their decision how to weigh your application, and I doubt that an addendum asking them to weigh it in a way that's favorable for you will really persuade them to do so.

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Re: "Demonstrated history of poor test taking"
« Reply #11 on: August 05, 2005, 11:31:14 AM »
But isn't your application itself already the "why you should accept me" part?  It seems entirely redundant (and kind of whiny/making excuses) to say "You should accept me despite my sub-par LSAT score because of the rest of my file."

I don't think it's whiny at all to say, "You asked for a full picture of me, and so I am presenting it." 

I mean, if they wanted to see only your LSAT and GPA, that's all they would ask for, and no one would be writing any personal statements, nor would we need LORs.

They are asking for a full picture--I see nothing wrong with giving it to them.

But they KNOW your LSAT score is low and that your GPA is high.  It's rather obvious.  Why point it out to them in an addendum?  Ultimately it's their decision how to weigh your application, and I doubt that an addendum asking them to weigh it in a way that's favorable for you will really persuade them to do so.

You're not asking them to weigh it in a more favorable way; you're asking them to consider it less.  And there's a difference.

practiceboy02

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Re: "Demonstrated history of poor test taking"
« Reply #12 on: August 05, 2005, 11:32:26 AM »
Considering the LSAT "less" means less relative to everyone else - so it's weighing it differently than everyone else, in a way that favors you.  So, yes, it's asking them to weigh it favorably for you, although not in so many words.

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Re: "Demonstrated history of poor test taking"
« Reply #13 on: August 05, 2005, 11:57:37 AM »
Considering the LSAT "less" means less relative to everyone else - so it's weighing it differently than everyone else, in a way that favors you.  So, yes, it's asking them to weigh it favorably for you, although not in so many words.

Ah, but it's the rhetoric of the situation that makes all the difference in how the addendum is received...

Take, for instance, the difference bewteen "excuses" and "reasons."  Both explain why something happened--but the connotations they carry are quite different...

shadowcreeper

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Re: "Demonstrated history of poor test taking"
« Reply #14 on: August 05, 2005, 12:56:56 PM »
I know that my addendum helped me. The deans at a few of the schools I applied to told me that my addendum was compelling and an asset to my application package.

I took the LSAT three times. The first and third test were 6 and 7 points higher than the second. I walked them through my decision for taking the test each time. I discussed my history with poor standardized test taking, and I backed that up with my SAT and GRE scores and my actual GPA in my undergrad and masters programs. In both cases the standardized tests were way off compared to my actual academic track record.

I then moved the addendum away from the LSAT score and focused on what I bring to the table and why I know I can succeed given the chance. I ended on a positive note, and avoided sounding like a cry baby all together. It is important to let the ad com see you as more than just numbers. You are selling yourself, and letting them know what your problems are and what you have that can compensate for those problems is certainly better than ignoring the problem in your application and hoping that maybe they just dont notice it.

Re: "Demonstrated history of poor test taking"
« Reply #15 on: August 05, 2005, 03:01:41 PM »
But isn't your application itself already the "why you should accept me" part?  It seems entirely redundant (and kind of whiny/making excuses) to say "You should accept me despite my sub-par LSAT score because of the rest of my file."

I don't think it's whiny at all to say, "You asked for a full picture of me, and so I am presenting it." 

I mean, if they wanted to see only your LSAT and GPA, that's all they would ask for, and no one would be writing any personal statements, nor would we need LORs.

They are asking for a full picture--I see nothing wrong with giving it to them.

But they KNOW your LSAT score is low and that your GPA is high.  It's rather obvious.  Why point it out to them in an addendum?  Ultimately it's their decision how to weigh your application, and I doubt that an addendum asking them to weigh it in a way that's favorable for you will really persuade them to do so.

They know your LSAT is low and your GPA is high, but they do not know one thing about your SAT score. The addendum isn't to point out the LSAT/GPA split they can already see. It is to provide a piece of information they do not already have that might cause them to evaluate the LSAT/GPA split differently.

Re: "Demonstrated history of poor test taking"
« Reply #16 on: August 05, 2005, 08:21:58 PM »
So an addendum is necessary if your score is even a few points below what law schools usually accept? I don't think so. There's no way I'm going to write an addendum explaining a 164 LSAT score if I were to apply to any top 10 school.

Bear in mind that it's better to send in an application with no addenda whatsoever. Addenda are clutter. They're only part of your file because they have to explain something. It's best to avoid explaining anything if you can.

cassise

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Re: "Demonstrated history of poor test taking"
« Reply #17 on: August 06, 2005, 12:11:19 AM »
So an addendum is necessary if your score is even a few points below what law schools usually accept? I don't think so. There's no way I'm going to write an addendum explaining a 164 LSAT score if I were to apply to any top 10 school.

Bear in mind that it's better to send in an application with no addenda whatsoever. Addenda are clutter. They're only part of your file because they have to explain something. It's best to avoid explaining anything if you can.

If you have a 164 LSAT and are not a URM, you won't be getting into any top 10 schools, unless you are absolutely remarkable in some other regard, so don't worry about it.  I agree that you shouldn't have to explain away a 164 LSAT, which is an "A" score, but if you want to get into a top 10 school, you'd better come up with something that forcibly persuades them to look at some other element of your application where you really stand out. 

You shouldn't send in 50 pages worth of addendum.  A few paragraphs of well thought out explanation is not going to be an issue.  In the case of a school like Michigan, where you are specifically given the opportunity to write addidtional essays to serve as addendums, you always should, if only to prove you have a strong interest in the school and took the time to fully engage their application. 

En Fuego is mostly on the mark here and I agree with a lot of what he said (which is kinda new since we have been going back and forth on a few threads), but I have one thing to add.

You shouldn't have to explain away an "A" score, but at the same time u r applying to the A+ schools.