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Author Topic: Significant Other Getting A Work Visa while I'm in Law School?  (Read 4655 times)

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Re: Significant Other Getting A Work Visa while I'm in Law School?
« Reply #20 on: August 05, 2005, 12:28:05 PM »
Ya, I guess I could go to USC or UCLA and then apply to transfer to a bunch of places. Who knows.

I don't suppose the US has similar immigration policies to Canada where foreigners can essentially buy their way in does it? In Canada, all you have to do is invest 50k or 100k and you're in. Her parents are loaded and could move some assets around to help if it mattered.

No, the US is not actively looking for people to move here.  The only ways to immigrate legally (IE get your Green Card) are shown on the link I sent you earlier. 

(Student visas and tourist visas are NON-IMMIGRANT visas--which also means that even if you spend the year in California, for example, you CANNOT establish residence for tuition purposes.  By definition, F-1 students are residents of their home countries, and therefore do not qualify for official US residence, much less State residence.)

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Re: Significant Other Getting A Work Visa while I'm in Law School?
« Reply #21 on: August 05, 2005, 12:33:47 PM »

Speaking of which, can lawyers from other countries easily get work visas/green cards? I've never heard anything about this.

To get a work visa, you just have to find an employer willing to sponsor you.  That's all.  But that does mean that (a) you typically have to find a company with deep pockets, because the filing fees are a fortune and usually require an immigration lawyer and (b) you have to be sufficiently desirable that they take you, and your visa issues, over someone they can hire with no problem.

To get an employment based Green Card, which is different from a work visa, there are other/additional hoops to jump through.  (Of course, you still need a sponsoring employer.  See the link I included in an earlier post for more details.)

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Re: Significant Other Getting A Work Visa while I'm in Law School?
« Reply #22 on: August 05, 2005, 12:48:36 PM »
I still think i would try to work out this uncle option, unless you're ready to elope (like hubby and I did) and attach her to your student visa.  If the plan is that she wants to work until she goes to med school and uncle can give her some secretary job or something to occupy her while she's studying for MCAT and filling out applications, that seems like the best way.  Unless she thinks she's going to hate working with him and will want to stop working there before she starts med school, then I don't think she'd have a problem waiting for that student visa.  That would also let her earn some money, but like Dilettante said, if money's not an issue, taking some easy CC credits might be the easiest way to get the visa.

I think this is a good suggestion.  Palm Springs is like 2 hours driving from the LA area.  This is NOT far (especially in comparison to Canada).

I still think, however, that your best bet in terms of not being separated would be to apply at the same time (something which you appear to be unwilling to do).

This is because, let's say you do get into UCLA or USC.  You spend a year there, and she spends a year in Palm Springs.  Who says you will be able to successfully transfer to where she ends up for Med School?  Or anywhere at all for that matter?  What if you don't get admitted for transfer ANYWHERE?  Are you going to drop out of your good law school just to be able to follow her?  Or what if you do get admitted for transfer near where she is going to be, but to a much lower ranked school?  Are you still willing to go when you only have 2 years left at the better one?

My advice remains the same: either apply at the same time, or resign yourselves to the possibility of having to be physically separated for a while.

Because even if you get married and have her rot with you for a year while you do 1L and she studies for the MCAT, you STILL can't guarantee where either of you will end up--she for Med School and you for Transfer.

I'm not saying don't go to law school and don't go to med school--I'm saying, understand the inherent possibility of separation.

3ML

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Re: Significant Other Getting A Work Visa while I'm in Law School?
« Reply #23 on: August 05, 2005, 01:39:08 PM »
Being apart for a year is increasingly looking like the most likely outcome. It's not a huge deal since both countries have numerous schools right near the border. In fact, these are the schools that most appeal to me just for cultural reasons (it would be really hard to move from Canada to Virginia or Texas for example). Likewise, there are a lot of Canadian schools near the border. She can take a one year masters program, or work or whatever while she prepares for the MCATs and her applications while I do law school. It's not rocket science by any means.

I was hoping for something better, but if this is the best we can do that we just have to make it work. It's as simple as that...

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Re: Significant Other Getting A Work Visa while I'm in Law School?
« Reply #24 on: August 05, 2005, 01:48:08 PM »
Being apart for a year is increasingly looking like the most likely outcome. It's not a huge deal since both countries have numerous schools right near the border. In fact, these are the schools that most appeal to me just for cultural reasons (it would be really hard to move from Canada to Virginia or Texas for example). Likewise, there are a lot of Canadian schools near the border. She can take a one year masters program, or work or whatever while she prepares for the MCATs and her applications while I do law school. It's not rocket science by any means.

I was hoping for something better, but if this is the best we can do that we just have to make it work. It's as simple as that...

Dude, don't sweat the "cultural" reasons... Texas and Virginia are JUST as foreign for me, from California, as they are for you... Really, though--there are good schools in those places, and there is really little reason to ignore them over "cultural" differences...

I mean, would you chose not to go to Oxford or the Sorbonne over cultural differences? Why should you snub UT or UVA? They're great for the program you're interested in, in the country you're interested in...  Besides, they are in basically urban or suburban environments... It's not like you'd be going to a little nowhere town.  Little nowhere towns don't have prestigious universities. It's part of why they are little nowhere towns...

Justme3

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Re: Significant Other Getting A Work Visa while I'm in Law School?
« Reply #25 on: August 05, 2005, 04:58:55 PM »
I think the OP's "cultural" reasons probably stem from him maybe not being "white"?  Then that would be perfectly understandable.  As to the GF question, I agree with the previous posters.  Perhaps, it may be better to wait a year and coordinate apps.  I mean, right now, all you have are hypotheticals since you haven't been admitted to any law schools yet so what the previous poster says is correct, you may not do well enough in law school to be able to transfer to another school to be closer to your GF.

The questions about work permits/visas have been thoroughly answered so I don't have much to add to it.

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Re: Significant Other Getting A Work Visa while I'm in Law School?
« Reply #26 on: August 05, 2005, 05:16:19 PM »
I think the OP's "cultural" reasons probably stem from him maybe not being "white"?  Then that would be perfectly understandable. 


Personally, I don't think it matters if you're white or not. (I'm hispanic, by the way...)

The way I see it, you go where the opportunities are.  Period.

Justme3

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Re: Significant Other Getting A Work Visa while I'm in Law School?
« Reply #27 on: August 05, 2005, 05:34:49 PM »
Quote
Personally, I don't think it matters if you're white or not. (I'm hispanic, by the way...)

The way I see it, you go where the opportunities are.  Period

True, but I think these other "factors" play a role on which law school to attend or not.  There's the urban vs rural, diverse student body vs not diverse, wealthy student body vs student body more similar to one's own socioeconomic background etc.

Of course, it all comes down to what a person likes.  I just wanted to add that maybe some people prefer to be in an area with a large population of their own ethnicity.  Like in school where people tend to make friends with others of their own ethnic background.

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Re: Significant Other Getting A Work Visa while I'm in Law School?
« Reply #28 on: August 05, 2005, 05:51:11 PM »
Yes, student body and population demographics are of concern, but given that the poster is specifically LOOKING at schools that involve leaving Canada, and therefore actively CONSIDERING moving to a different country with a different culture, I don't think it should be THAT much of a factor.

I mean, if you're willing to relocate to another country to pursue your career goals, I don't think it's legitimate to say, "I just couldn't handle those people out in [Texas/Georgia/France/Quebec/Germany/China/Pakistan/Insert Place Here]."  Talk about short-sighted!

The way I see it, if the school that will provide you with the most opportunities post-graduation is in Texas, go there. If the school with the most post-graduation opportunities is in California, go there. 

Besides, the poster mentioned being a West Coast Canadian.  Sounds Vancouver-ish to me--and having been to Vancouver, I can say that (1) it's beautiful, and (2) yeah, it's different.  But it's not like moving to another planet... I moved to South America for a year--third world country and all--and even THAT wasn't like moving to another planet.

Besides, what's wrong with getting exposure to wealthy people if you're not?  Or urban living if you're from a rural area (or vice versa)?  Most of the prestigious schools this poster has been interested in AREN'T in rural areas or totally devoid of people with "normal" incomes anyway...

Besides, he's said his family and his GF's family are loaded.  So whatever.

And, sure, it's stupid for people in the US to refer to all hispanics as Mexican, but I can see where it comes from.  Most hispanics in the US ARE Mexican... So whatever.

I mean, sure, there are somethings that are perhaps worth correcting (ie I tell people, "Um, not all hispanics are Mexican"), but it wouldn't have kept me from going to principally-white Yale had I gotten in either... 

Remember--the MAJORITY of the US population is WHITE.  That's why everyone else is a MINORITY... You can't expect the numerical majority to be somehow be represented as a numerical minority in schools.  The math just doesn't work that way...

It would have been like going to South America and getting uncomfortable about being one of the few Americans there.  Like I shouldn't EXPECT to be outnumbered?

Justme3

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Re: Significant Other Getting A Work Visa while I'm in Law School?
« Reply #29 on: August 05, 2005, 06:11:43 PM »
I accidentally overwrote my last paragraph in my post while cutting and pasting another one but oh well. In response, I agree with what you're saying but I was just trying to point out that there's nothing wrong with trying to find another area similar to what one has been used to.

But you're right, the OP is trying to get into the prestigious schools which are mainly in non-rural areas, with the exception of perhaps Cornell.  However, he mentioned his GF and their desire to be close so I don't think just going to the best school he gets into is that simple.  Simple for people who are single but maybe not so for people who are committed and so have to take into consideration their SO.

There's nothing wrong with exposure to wealthy people at all but no one wants to be the odd one out.  But yes, having new experiences is all about being in law school and what makes it great!