Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: Slang, Black English, Ghetto talk, etc.  (Read 17224 times)

Rudy Huckleberry

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 3144
    • View Profile
Re: Slang, Black English, Ghetto talk, etc.
« Reply #20 on: July 28, 2005, 09:50:43 AM »
Cannot or Can Not?
According to Merriam Webster's Dictionary of English Usage, "Both spellings are acceptable, but cannot is more frequent in current use. Chambers 1985 insists that cannot must be used in British English unless the not is to receive particular emphasis. A couple of American sources (Oxford American Dictionary 1980, Trimble 1975) mention that the two-word form can be used to indicate special emphasis.... "Can you jump? I can not, says the sergeant" (219).

Are you arguing that OP was trying to indicate special emphasis?  Because according to this source, "can not" is acceptable but is not the most appropriate choice here.

YoungIke

  • Guest
Re: Slang, Black English, Ghetto talk, etc.
« Reply #21 on: July 28, 2005, 09:51:10 AM »
You are not helping your community by saying to them I'm better than you. You must be down to earth. There is a difference between slang and just down right bad English. Slang is words that not a majority of people know the true meaning to, like an inside joke, now when you just can't but a sentence together that is different. And trust me all the rich black folk I know aside from bankers who are an anomaly don't go around on their spare time trying to prove to everyone they are educated. Also it depends on your business. Trust me doctors do not because they sure weren't English majors so they probably speak Basic English. Also if you came from a majority black environment you have words from that environment that you use, but you know the time and place. Same goes with white folks. I still don't know what "Get er Done" is but that’s white southern culture so who am I to criticize.

j.rosh

  • Guest
Re: Slang, Black English, Ghetto talk, etc.
« Reply #22 on: July 28, 2005, 09:54:58 AM »
I still don't know what "Get er Done" is but that’s white southern culture so who am I to criticize.

 :D :D
Where are you from?  I hear that every other day!

Rudy Huckleberry

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 3144
    • View Profile
Re: Slang, Black English, Ghetto talk, etc.
« Reply #23 on: July 28, 2005, 09:55:44 AM »
I still don't know what "Get er Done" is but that’s white southern culture so who am I to criticize.

 :D :D
Where are you from?  I hear that every other day!

LOL! I know right! :D

YoungIke

  • Guest
Re: Slang, Black English, Ghetto talk, etc.
« Reply #24 on: July 28, 2005, 09:56:56 AM »
I still don't know what "Get er Done" is but that’s white southern culture so who am I to criticize.

 :D :D
Where are you from?  I hear that every other day!

From Maryland, but did undergrad in Winston-Salem, NC

I hear America singing

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 746
  • How do you do?
    • View Profile
    • Visit my Weblog!
Re: Slang, Black English, Ghetto talk, etc.
« Reply #25 on: July 28, 2005, 10:05:11 AM »
Cannot or Can Not?
According to Merriam Webster's Dictionary of English Usage, "Both spellings are acceptable, but cannot is more frequent in current use. Chambers 1985 insists that cannot must be used in British English unless the not is to receive particular emphasis. A couple of American sources (Oxford American Dictionary 1980, Trimble 1975) mention that the two-word form can be used to indicate special emphasis.... "Can you jump? I can not, says the sergeant" (219).

Are you arguing that OP was trying to indicate special emphasis?  Because according to this source, "can not" is acceptable but is not the most appropriate choice here.

Did you read the passage, or just infer your own meaning into the text?

"Both spellings are acceptable, but cannot is more frequent in current use."

Everything that follows is a caveat that doesn't have to apply or a corollary that isn't applicable.

I cannot believe you don't understand this concept.

I can not believe you don't understand this concept.
"I have loved the stars too fondly to be fearful of the night."

Visit my weblog!  www.sweetblessedfreedom.blogs pot.com

faith2005

  • Guest
Re: Slang, Black English, Ghetto talk, etc.
« Reply #26 on: July 28, 2005, 10:09:47 AM »
This is hilarious. I hear America singing, do you spend alot of time in predominately black settings that are socio-economically diverse? If you do not, then you probably wouldn't hear your black friends speak in Ebonics, or even use slang. The two terms are not synonymous. Ebonics, as Claire pointed out, refers to a type of English dialect that developed combining West African linguistic patterns with English vocabulary. For example, in Ebonics, the to be verb is conjugated differently and there is linguistic research that shows this is traceable to the fact that certain W. African languages conjugated the to be verb in this pattern. (I be going...). Slang is something that is more related to generation and place. So my Grandparents have different slang than I do. In either case, trust me when I say that most black people would not speak in slang or Ebonics around anyone they weren't totally comfortable around, for fear of being judged. Funny how, thats exactly what you did when you wrote "you're already doing plenty to hold down your own race." These types of judgements and misunderstandings are the reason why your black doctor friend will never speak around you the way that he speaks to his family when you're not around. You and others might think he's less of an intellectual. hth

Both "cannot" and "can not" are acceptable; I'd suggest a quick Google before you try to be condescending.

There is no such thing as "Black English."  It is more realistic to say that slang originates from economic divides.  The rich upper-class black doctor will probably speak better English than the poor white boy on welfare, and vice versa.

It's about money, not color.

WoW, you are so wrong. A black doctor will not speak slang in the office, but at the family BBQ he will. It is definitely a race and culture thing. Economics might affect the ability for you to be able to speak both slang dialect and the kings English, but black professionals do have a life outside of being professional and sure don't go around making their subjects and verbs agree in a non-professional setting. That’s called being “buggie” or bourgeoisie in the kings English and is frowned upon in our community.

Wow.  You can call off the KKK, because you're already doing plenty to hold down your own race.  You actually think that every rich black doctor uses slang when he is out with his other rich black friends?  You're delusional.  I don't believe you can honestly say that your "community" frowns upon those who choose to use correct grammar in every situation.  I can imagine someone choosing to do so, but being ostracized for not might be the most backwards thing I have ever heard of.

Rudy Huckleberry

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 3144
    • View Profile
Re: Slang, Black English, Ghetto talk, etc.
« Reply #27 on: July 28, 2005, 10:20:37 AM »
Cannot or Can Not?
According to Merriam Webster's Dictionary of English Usage, "Both spellings are acceptable, but cannot is more frequent in current use. Chambers 1985 insists that cannot must be used in British English unless the not is to receive particular emphasis. A couple of American sources (Oxford American Dictionary 1980, Trimble 1975) mention that the two-word form can be used to indicate special emphasis.... "Can you jump? I can not, says the sergeant" (219).

Are you arguing that OP was trying to indicate special emphasis?  Because according to this source, "can not" is acceptable but is not the most appropriate choice here.

Did you read the passage, or just infer your own meaning into the text?

"Both spellings are acceptable, but cannot is more frequent in current use."

Everything that follows is a caveat that doesn't have to apply or a corollary that isn't applicable.

I cannot believe you don't understand this concept.

I can not believe you don't understand this concept.

I'm tired of debating "can not" with you.  Let's just see how smart everyone thinks you and the OP are for using it.  As for me and my house, we'll be using "cannot." :P

Funny that this seems to be a clever decoy for avoiding addressing the larger issue - "Black English", whether it exists, and whether it is socioeconomic, ethnic, or a combination of the two.  Just admit that you were handily PWN3D on this point, and crawl on back to lurkerdom.

BigMix

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 144
    • View Profile
    • My Blog
Re: Slang, Black English, Ghetto talk, etc.
« Reply #28 on: July 28, 2005, 10:23:53 AM »
I guess it depends on the black people. Some educated black folks are laid back, and can speak their ebonics in their family, while some are over socialized and it becomes a torn whenever they hear broken language.

I went to piano lessons for about 3 years; the teacher was an old black woman, and she prohibited me from using the term, "Okay". I always had to say yes.

blk_reign

  • LSD Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 7978
    • View Profile
Re: Slang, Black English, Ghetto talk, etc.
« Reply #29 on: July 28, 2005, 10:26:55 AM »
don't get carried away here... :D .. i see the point you're trying to make though...


 black professionals do have a life outside of being professional and sure don't go around making their subjects and verbs agree in a non-professional setting. That’s called being “buggie” or bourgeoisie in the kings English and is frowned upon in our community.
We're not accepting this CHANGE UP in the rules. Period. American presidents have been in the bed with organized crime, corporate pilferers, and the like for years. And all u want to put on this man is that his pastor said "Gotdamn America?" Hell, America.U got off pretty damn well, if you ask me...