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Author Topic: Slang, Black English, Ghetto talk, etc.  (Read 16135 times)

YoungIke

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Re: Slang, Black English, Ghetto talk, etc.
« Reply #10 on: July 28, 2005, 07:57:55 AM »
This is one of the many reasons that I didn't attend a predominately black college/university... this board is littered with people who can not even express themselves clearly without the use of slang.



OK as an HBCU grad I am offended and to say that people can't express themselves is false. If you did use slang in HBCU classes you would fail. Every culture has its own degree of slang terms that identify members of that culture to each other. Black have formed a bong over time due to past struggles and out of those terms have ways of expression totally unique to our culture. Why should we as brothers and sister change our dialogue and expression just because people are watching? It is a camaraderie that comes from that expression that goes frequently misunderstood by those outside of that culture. Slang also identifies region as well as culture and by denying that fact you are denying your history and heritage. Now I do believe words such as the "N" word should not be used in a public forum as that they are offensive to many Blacks even when used by other Blacks and is misunderstood by all others. I also do not agree with Identifying slang as a language (ie.. Ebonics). This is just an attempt to keep African-Americans ignorant and have an excuse to hold them back in dominant society. You must know how to express yourself in a professional manner as well as not abandon that from whence you came in the name of fitting into a dominant society who could care less about you. Slang is an expression of individuality and should be used among each other regardless of your or others perception. "Until you love your self you will never gain the respect of others".  Also notice that on this board the use of informal language is predicated on the topic of conversation. Also, if you have questions on the law or anything of an intellectual nature, we will so eloquently oblige you inquiries than return to our informal conversation that builds camaraderie and let us know that we all in the same game and want each other to succeed in a loving environment. So in the words of my community I greet you and bid you good day. "Peace Cuz, One Love"

j.rosh

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Re: Slang, Black English, Ghetto talk, etc.
« Reply #11 on: July 28, 2005, 08:52:55 AM »
This is one of the many reasons that I didn't attend a predominately black college/university... this board is littered with people who can not even express themselves clearly without the use of slang.




How can you say that about HBCU's; you didn't know anything about Howard in this thread:

http://www.lawschooldiscussion.org/prelaw/index.php/topic,38901.msg670015.html#msg670015

This board is very helpful where ideas are expressed clearly; sorry you were too lazy to do a real search on the other topics on this board.

Rudy Huckleberry

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Re: Slang, Black English, Ghetto talk, etc.
« Reply #12 on: July 28, 2005, 09:03:01 AM »
This is one of the many reasons that I didn't attend a predominately black college/university... this board is littered with people who can not even express themselves clearly without the use of slang.

FYI: While we're talking grammar, "can not" is one word -- "cannot."

I don't see anything wrong with using "slang" or "Black English" in casual conversation.  I'm not interested in erasing my ethnicity in my speech.  Reject self-hatred, T14.  You will be a happier and healthier person.  You will never be White, so get over it.  Read up on the cultural history of "Ebonics"/Black English before you bash it and equate it with slang.

I hear America singing

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Re: Slang, Black English, Ghetto talk, etc.
« Reply #13 on: July 28, 2005, 09:16:21 AM »
Both "cannot" and "can not" are acceptable; I'd suggest a quick Google before you try to be condescending.

There is no such thing as "Black English."  It is more realistic to say that slang originates from economic divides.  The rich upper-class black doctor will probably speak better English than the poor white boy on welfare, and vice versa.

It's about money, not color.
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Rudy Huckleberry

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Re: Slang, Black English, Ghetto talk, etc.
« Reply #14 on: July 28, 2005, 09:28:57 AM »
Both "cannot" and "can not" are acceptable; I'd suggest a quick Google before you try to be condescending.

There is no such thing as "Black English."  It is more realistic to say that slang originates from economic divides.  The rich upper-class black doctor will probably speak better English than the poor white boy on welfare, and vice versa.

It's about money, not color.

Ahh, it's just not standard.  You got me on that one.  Well, I won't be using it.

But before you try to be condescending, maybe you should do a quick Google search.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ebonics

I read this book about it: Beyond Ebonics: Linguistic Pride and Racial Prejudice http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0195152891/qid=1122557088/sr=8-4/ref=pd_bbs_4/102-7767711-7012133?v=glance&s=books&n=507846

Indeed, Mr. Colorblind, it is not about money this time.  It's about ethnicity.  And I don't know where you're from, but poor Black people most certainly do not speak the same way as poor Whites, and many middle class Black people speak differently from middle class Whites.  You don't need a book (or a Google search) to tell you that.

blk_reign

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Re: Slang, Black English, Ghetto talk, etc.
« Reply #15 on: July 28, 2005, 09:29:43 AM »
I started to type in vernacular Claire when I read the first post... but it was late and the OP wasn't worth it  :D


in an aside.. don't you guys just love when random people start posting on threads that have a derogatory title on blsd?

and ... I hear America Singing..

can not is only to be used when the not forms another thought...

so the structure of the sentence was still incorrect....

Black English is considered to be dialect and vernacular...when slaves were brought over from Africa from various countries obviously many different languages were spoken... a language was developed (merging of thier native tongue and some standard English) so that they could communicate with one another...

When Malindy Sings by Paul Laurence Dunbar

G'way an' quit dat noise, Miss Lucy—
Put dat music book away;
What's de use to keep on tryin'?
Ef you practise twell you're gray...

You ain't got de nachel o'gans
Fu' to make de soun' come right,
You ain't got de tu'ns an' twistin's
Fu' to make it sweet an' light....

Easy 'nough fu' folk to hollah,
Lookin' at de lines an' dots,
When dey ain't no one kin sence it,
An' de chune comes in, in spots
We're not accepting this CHANGE UP in the rules. Period. American presidents have been in the bed with organized crime, corporate pilferers, and the like for years. And all u want to put on this man is that his pastor said "Gotdamn America?" Hell, America.U got off pretty damn well, if you ask me...

YoungIke

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Re: Slang, Black English, Ghetto talk, etc.
« Reply #16 on: July 28, 2005, 09:35:37 AM »
Both "cannot" and "can not" are acceptable; I'd suggest a quick Google before you try to be condescending.

There is no such thing as "Black English."  It is more realistic to say that slang originates from economic divides.  The rich upper-class black doctor will probably speak better English than the poor white boy on welfare, and vice versa.

It's about money, not color.

WoW, you are so wrong. A black doctor will not speak slang in the office, but at the family BBQ he will. It is definitely a race and culture thing. Economics might affect the ability for you to be able to speak both slang dialect and the kings English, but black professionals do have a life outside of being professional and sure don't go around making their subjects and verbs agree in a non-professional setting. That’s called being “buggie” or bourgeoisie in the kings English and is frowned upon in our community.

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Re: Slang, Black English, Ghetto talk, etc.
« Reply #17 on: July 28, 2005, 09:40:38 AM »
Both "cannot" and "can not" are acceptable; I'd suggest a quick Google before you try to be condescending.

There is no such thing as "Black English."  It is more realistic to say that slang originates from economic divides.  The rich upper-class black doctor will probably speak better English than the poor white boy on welfare, and vice versa.

It's about money, not color.

WoW, you are so wrong. A black doctor will not speak slang in the office, but at the family BBQ he will. It is definitely a race and culture thing. Economics might affect the ability for you to be able to speak both slang dialect and the kings English, but black professionals do have a life outside of being professional and sure don't go around making their subjects and verbs agree in a non-professional setting. That’s called being “buggie” or bourgeoisie in the kings English and is frowned upon in our community.

Wow.  You can call off the KKK, because you're already doing plenty to hold down your own race.  You actually think that every rich black doctor uses slang when he is out with his other rich black friends?  You're delusional.  I don't believe you can honestly say that your "community" frowns upon those who choose to use correct grammar in every situation.  I can imagine someone choosing to do so, but being ostracized for not might be the most backwards thing I have ever heard of.
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I hear America singing

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Re: Slang, Black English, Ghetto talk, etc.
« Reply #18 on: July 28, 2005, 09:46:07 AM »
Cannot or Can Not?
According to Merriam Webster's Dictionary of English Usage, "Both spellings are acceptable, but cannot is more frequent in current use. Chambers 1985 insists that cannot must be used in British English unless the not is to receive particular emphasis. A couple of American sources (Oxford American Dictionary 1980, Trimble 1975) mention that the two-word form can be used to indicate special emphasis.... "Can you jump? I can not, says the sergeant" (219).
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Rudy Huckleberry

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Re: Slang, Black English, Ghetto talk, etc.
« Reply #19 on: July 28, 2005, 09:48:09 AM »
I'm not sure I agree with Ike's assessment that there's this community rejection of standard English ("standard English" - not "correct grammar.")  However, I thought I'd point out that virtually no one uses standard English in all situations, as evidenced by your own sentence:

Quote
I can imagine someone choosing to do so, but being ostracized for not might be the most backwards thing I have ever heard of.

Verrrry interesting.  This sentence could only be correct in a nonstandard, conversational sense.