Law School Discussion

Using arrest for PS

LaneSwerver

Re: Using arrest for PS
« Reply #20 on: July 22, 2005, 01:15:51 PM »
We're definitely all crazy and have little worth saying.

I'd include that, but I don't know if I'd make it the central issue.

Re: Using arrest for PS
« Reply #21 on: July 22, 2005, 01:18:23 PM »
I am going to have to explain 3 things anyway.  It would knock them all out. 

1. the arrest
2. why I left my career (nontrad)
3. why law and what area


LaneSwerver

Re: Using arrest for PS
« Reply #22 on: July 22, 2005, 01:19:27 PM »
Post deleter!

Re: Using arrest for PS
« Reply #23 on: July 22, 2005, 01:21:18 PM »
Ok, it's back.  I was seeing if I could delete it.  I don't know much about the extras on here.

LaneSwerver

Re: Using arrest for PS
« Reply #24 on: July 22, 2005, 01:22:14 PM »
Ok, it's back.  I was seeing if I could delete it.  I don't know much about the extras on here.

Heh heh...best of luck in putting it all together. It sounds like you know what you're doing.

Re: Using arrest for PS
« Reply #25 on: July 22, 2005, 01:28:13 PM »
Postus-Interruptus!

EvieO

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Re: Using arrest for PS
« Reply #26 on: July 22, 2005, 05:02:12 PM »
Unless you were jailed for civil disobedience or some other righteous cause, I personally wouldn't showcase any arrest record.  You do have to include an addendum, of course, but that can be short and sweet. 

You're trying to give the adcoms a snapshot of who you are.  I know you want to emphasize the good things that came out of it, but if you conjure up a picture of your public indecency during Mardi Gras or what-have-you, it's hard to erase.  You run the risk of sticking in their minds as "the guy who got arrested for X."  Personally, I'd rather be "the guy who lives on Lucky Charms" than that guy.

Just my 2 cents.

SkullTatt

Re: Using arrest for PS
« Reply #27 on: July 23, 2005, 09:15:40 AM »
If you do write about the arrest, I would definitely spin it EXTREMELY positively. Like, you were arrested  because of a misidentification, and you were released and the cops found the real perpetrator and convicted him on ironclad evidence. It's a plus if you're a minority and were abused by the cops who presumed you were guilty because of your skin color.

Better yet... you were arrested but released on bail, during which time you marshaled all your investigative powers to find the "real killers." You did, causing your charges to be thrown out and the "real killers" to be sentenced to life behind bars. You became the star witness in the case, and not incidentally the private investigation business you started as a result has become extremely successful and employs 12 ex-cons full time, allowing them to re-integrate into society.

Re: Using arrest for PS
« Reply #28 on: July 25, 2005, 04:18:28 PM »
On many (I think most) of your law school apps, you'll have to answer a question about arrests, even if they were expunged.  When you check the yes box, you'll have the opportunity to explain, and write a separate essay about your experience.  That way you'll get to make your point, but you don't have to use your arrest for your personal statement.  A personal statement should be about accomplishments. 

Re: Using arrest for PS
« Reply #29 on: July 25, 2005, 06:11:56 PM »
and avoid writing things like you got arrested and it wasn't your fault.  Unless you got a personal handwritten apology from the DA, that's about the least convincing thing someone can say.