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Author Topic: Is Cooley Really The Worst Law School  (Read 46842 times)

GodspeedMUFC

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Re: Is Cooley Really The Worst Law School
« Reply #170 on: May 09, 2008, 10:40:29 PM »
I love Cooley... they rank Brooklyn above Duke and almost equal to Stamford. I can feel my inferiority complex melting away. I can't wait to tell the kids on autoadmit...
In- St. John's ($$$), Seton Hall ($$$$), Temple, Northeastern , Suffolk ($$) and American. Brooklyn

Out- Boston College, Fordham and George Washington.

Still waiting- BU.

LSAT 163 UGPA 3.3 Masters degrees with 3.95 GPA.

alex_palazzolo

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Re: Is Cooley Really The Worst Law School
« Reply #171 on: May 10, 2008, 02:29:52 AM »
...Bunch of f***ing amateurs!

hahahaha. donny, youre out of your element

NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!

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Re: Is Cooley Really The Worst Law School
« Reply #172 on: May 24, 2008, 03:24:09 PM »
Dude, I think University of La Verne in CA has Cooley beat. According to the ABA book they had a 27% bar passage rate and only 32% of their class was employed 9 months after graduation. Not only that, but they charge 30K a year for tuition. To top it off, they charge $60 just to apply. That's more than most 1st tier schools. I think this place should lose its accreditation.

UnoriginalAndrew

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Re: Is Cooley Really The Worst Law School
« Reply #173 on: May 25, 2008, 07:22:34 PM »
Are they even fully accredited?
I Choo-Choo-Choose you:  Boston College Law School, Class of 2011

Remedialone

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Re: Is Cooley Really The Worst Law School
« Reply #174 on: May 26, 2008, 09:23:21 AM »

Sergio

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Re: Is Cooley Really The Worst Law School
« Reply #175 on: May 26, 2008, 08:44:11 PM »
Cooley is basically the last resort for people who want to be a lawyer but have poor academic backgrounds.  Hell, I don't think you even need a college degree to enroll.  So they go there, smart ones transfer up to a T2, and many flunk out.  Those people are all better off than the ones who stay 3 years.

Remedialone

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Re: Is Cooley Really The Worst Law School
« Reply #176 on: May 27, 2008, 07:30:38 AM »
Cooley is basically the last resort for people who want to be a lawyer but have poor academic backgrounds.  Hell, I don't think you even need a college degree to enroll.  So they go there, smart ones transfer up to a T2, and many flunk out.  Those people are all better off than the ones who stay 3 years.

I have seen this statement before.  Certainly it is a last resort for many.  In terms of not needing a BA there are cases in many schools where people have been admitted recently without a BA.  Tulane accepts them.  Yale accepts them.  Wyoming admits them.  I am sure there are others.  Many don't transfer out because they are receiving full scholarships.  I have developed  relationships with a few attorneys who are Cooley grads and doing very well.

F. Mercury

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Re: Is Cooley Really The Worst Law School
« Reply #177 on: June 05, 2008, 10:25:21 PM »
to answer OP's question:  is there any meaningful difference between the worst and one of the worst?

I can has lauskul!

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Re: Is Cooley Really The Worst Law School
« Reply #178 on: June 16, 2008, 03:58:51 PM »
I love Cooley... they rank Brooklyn above Duke and almost equal to Stamford. I can feel my inferiority complex melting away. I can't wait to tell the kids on autoadmit...

Almost equal to Stamford?  Say it ain't so!  How does it compare relative to Halvord, Enwyewe, Kalombiya and Burkaly?

 :P

TimMitchell

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Re: Is Cooley Really The Worst Law School
« Reply #179 on: June 18, 2008, 10:09:57 PM »
Cooley's ranking methodology. Seem to favor how large the student size is by incorporating not only class size, but also  total number of professors, total minority, first year section size, etc. It is kind of shameful how they tweak their own ratings to make themselves look better. Cooley has over 3x the students of the next largest law school and over 5x the average... oh and their 1L attrition is over 25%, meaning more people drop out of Cooley every year than attend most other schools  ::)

Total J.D. Enrollment - The total enrollment of a law school reflects its success in attracting students, its appeal to those interested in legal education, and its ability to carry out its institutional mission. While size alone does not assure quality, it does permit a school to offer its students a greater variety of courses, programs, and activities. All other things being equal, a good big school is better than a good small school.

Total Minority Enrollment - Law school has always been an avenue for social mobility and the integration of minority groups into the mainstream of American civic and commercial life. The extent to which law schools open their doors to minority students measures their contribution to the American dream.

Percentage of Minority Students -The relative percentage of minority students, rather than the total number of such students, reflects the overall composition of the student body. Comparing percentages of students allows another perspective regarding access to a school's program.

75th Percentile Undergraduate Grade Point Average - The quality of a student body is often measured by its level of performance at the undergraduate level. Taken as a whole, students with higher grades tend to be better college students than those with lower grades. The conventional wisdom is that students with higher undergraduate grade point averages will do better in law school than those with lower grades.

75th Percentile LSAT Scores - The LSAT is a test designed to level the playing field when comparing undergraduate grade point averages, particularly when attempting to compare grades among students with different major fields of study at different colleges and universities. Taken as a whole, students with higher LSAT scores have a better potential for success than those with lower scores.

Total Applications - Applications represent a way to determine the market share of a law school. Schools with high application volumes demonstrate a measurable level of demand among potential law students, a reflection of perceived quality.

Number of Full-Time Faculty - Full-time faculty members are the heart of every educational endeavor. The larger a school's full-time faculty, the greater the possibility of providing a wider and richer variety of courses, programs, and activities taught and supervised by those whose sole responsibility is the education of its students.

Number of Part-Time Faculty - Part-time faculty enrich a school's program of legal education, bringing diversity of experience, the practitioner's view of the demands and ethics of law practice, and a depth of knowledge in specialty areas not available in all instances among full-time faculty members.

Total Teaching Faculty - The educational resource of a school is its faculty. The larger the overall size of a faculty, the more likely that school can deliver a complete educational program which satisfies the needs and demands of its students. Larger size enhances the access to teachers among students, the variety of role models, the diversity of scholarly opinion, and the opportunity for intellectual exchange. Administrators and librarians who teach are excluded from this total.

Number of Minority Faculty - Just as minority enrollment levels reflect across to the opportunity for a legal education, the number of minority law school faculty reflects access to the highest levels of the legal profession.

Student-Faculty Ratio - Faculty size alone does not assure contact with students and smaller class sizes. The ratio of students to faculty reflects the potential for greater individual contact in smaller classes. In general, the lower the student-faculty ratio, the better the chances that small group and individual contact will occur.

Typical First-Year Section Size - Section size reflects the potential for enhanced interchange between faculty and students and opportunity for more attention to individual students. It also reduces the burden on faculty members. Conventional wisdom concludes that the smaller the section size, the better the potential for high-quality instruction.

Number of Course Titles Beyond the First Year - Another aspect that relates the positive effect of large size to the quality of legal education is the diversity of course offerings in courses offered to students at advanced stages of their legal education. A larger number of advanced course offerings means that a greater number of students can study a greater variety of legal areas of particular interest to them and receive a more thorough understanding of those areas.

Full-Time Resident Tuition - The cost of legal education is a significant factor affecting law school selection. All other things being equal, the less expensive the cost of legal education the better. Put another way, extra expense should bring extra benefits to the student. This factor favors public school education over private school education, since the taxpayers subsidize the cost of legal education at public schools.

Full-Time Non-resident Tuition - The parameters change somewhat when the cost of attending an out-of-state school are considered, because many schools charge a large tuition premium to non-residents. Although taxpayers still subsidize some of the cost for non-residents, the subsidy is not as extensive, so public schools are not so much of a bargain for non-resident students.

Percentage of Students Receiving Grants/Scholarships - Legal education costs are lowered through various forms of grants and scholarships. Schools that offer the broadest coverage reduce the overall educational cost to the greatest number of students.

Median Amount of Grants/Scholarships - The percentage of students receiving aid measures the breadth of tuition relief; the median amount of such support measures the depth of such aid.

Total Volumes in Library - The most common expression of the extent of a law school library is the total number of volumes in its collection. Generally, the larger the collection the better the library serves as a resource to students and faculty.

Total Titles in Library - The number of titles evidences the breadth of a collection. Generally, the greater the number of titles, the better the library serves as a resource to students and faculty.

Total Serial Subscriptions - The number of serial subscriptions measures the extent of a library's periodical collection. The larger the number of serial subscriptions, the better a library provides access to current legal materials and keeps those materials up to date.

Number of Professional Librarians - Access to professional library staff is important for students and faculty, as well as for the legal community in which the library is located. A large professional library staff assures a quality library collection and that students and staff will have knowledgeable resource persons when research questions arise. Previous Official Guide editions used the “number of library professional staff.”