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Author Topic: What E&E books schould I get?  (Read 4097 times)

BAFF213

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Re: What E&E books schould I get?
« Reply #20 on: July 22, 2005, 12:41:50 AM »
a. you aren't BAFF, where's your avatar? 
b. baff=tag

a. it was time to make a change
b. gotcha

melissamw

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Re: What E&E books schould I get?
« Reply #21 on: July 22, 2005, 10:52:26 AM »
Someone on the NU message boards posted which classes were first semester....  here it is:

First semester:

Civ Pro, Torts, Contracts, Crim and CLR


Second semester:

Con Law, Property and CLR (plus two electives)


Hope this helps!  Oh, and I have done the Torts E&E and ordered the civ pro one.  The torts was actually kinda fun!


Eh

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Re: What E&E books schould I get?
« Reply #22 on: July 23, 2005, 01:46:22 PM »
fj

lcmatl

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Re: What E&E books schould I get?
« Reply #23 on: July 23, 2005, 03:13:19 PM »
(tag)

Harrahs

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Re: What E&E books schould I get?
« Reply #24 on: July 23, 2005, 04:53:39 PM »
many people have mentioned that e & es should be used carefully when prepping, because the examples and explanations part of the books -- about two-thirds of their content -- is best used during the semester when you are more knowledgeable about the concepts at hand.  that being said, i just finished glannon's civil procedure, and i think that it gave me excellent insight and a sense of which concepts will take more prodding when the semester begins.  that being said, i just read the initial chapters on each concept; i did not touch the examples and explanations.  i will save those for later, thus giving me more time now to move on to a different e and e. 

according to the authors of getting to maybe, the following are "commercial classics": prosser on torts; mccormkick on evidence; farnsworth on contracts; chirelstein on tax; glannon on civil procedure; tribe on constitutional law.

casino


BAFF213

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Re: What E&E books schould I get?
« Reply #25 on: July 23, 2005, 08:21:42 PM »
im not saying youre wrong, but i dont remember anyone mentioning not to do the examples part of the e & e's. can you cite any sources (e.g. threads)?

many people have mentioned that e & es should be used carefully when prepping, because the examples and explanations part of the books -- about two-thirds of their content -- is best used during the semester when you are more knowledgeable about the concepts at hand.  that being said, i just finished glannon's civil procedure, and i think that it gave me excellent insight and a sense of which concepts will take more prodding when the semester begins.  that being said, i just read the initial chapters on each concept; i did not touch the examples and explanations.  i will save those for later, thus giving me more time now to move on to a different e and e. 

according to the authors of getting to maybe, the following are "commercial classics": prosser on torts; mccormkick on evidence; farnsworth on contracts; chirelstein on tax; glannon on civil procedure; tribe on constitutional law.

casino



Harrahs

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Re: What E&E books schould I get?
« Reply #26 on: July 23, 2005, 10:35:09 PM »
http://www.lawschooldiscussion.org/prelaw/index.php/topic,36889.0.html

check out lenny's response, ten responses down. 

personally, i think what he says makes sense: if you work on the examples now, especially with only a basic knowledge of the individual concepts (i.e., without having attended classes, read the cases, briefed, etc.), you run the risk of remembering the explanations now, thus tainting them as a future resource.  that being said, going over the examples and the explanations, much like going over lsat questions and answers, may help down the line.

nonetheless, in the process of finding the above thread, i found others that suggested that working on hypos is an important skill, one that is worth practicing before entering law school. 

i just think that it takes too much time.  i have read everything on my school's recommened reading list -- getting to maybe, civil action, buffalo creek, elements of style -- and now, with only a few weeks left, am trying to get a general sense of the concepts in the first semester's classes.  a friend of mine sent me lexisnexus's understanding law school, which has (very) introductory chapters detailing each class, and now i am looking into some e & es, just having finished civil procedure.  while i am sure there is merit to delving further into each subject, i really just want a basic knowledge of my first semester courses.  if for no other reason to give myself a bit of confidence.  plus, i don't really have anything better to do with my time as well. ;)

casino


BAFF213

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Re: What E&E books schould I get?
« Reply #27 on: July 24, 2005, 01:43:57 AM »
yea i wasn't sure which approach to take so i took the "read little but go in depth on what ive read." ive been reading, highlighting, typing notes out, and typing out thorough answers to the examples. thus, i haven't been able to read very many chapters in any of the e&e's. ive just been doing like the first 3 chapters in each e&e. i dunno -- maybe youre strategy is better...

ive just been trying to get an idea of whether i think the e&e's are effective and whether i am going to stick with them through the semester. i want to get my study strategy squared away as early as possible, whether it's 50/50 cases/supplements or some other ratio, such as no cases (and briefing) at all.

http://www.lawschooldiscussion.org/prelaw/index.php/topic,36889.0.html

check out lenny's response, ten responses down. 

personally, i think what he says makes sense: if you work on the examples now, especially with only a basic knowledge of the individual concepts (i.e., without having attended classes, read the cases, briefed, etc.), you run the risk of remembering the explanations now, thus tainting them as a future resource.  that being said, going over the examples and the explanations, much like going over lsat questions and answers, may help down the line.

nonetheless, in the process of finding the above thread, i found others that suggested that working on hypos is an important skill, one that is worth practicing before entering law school. 

i just think that it takes too much time.  i have read everything on my school's recommened reading list -- getting to maybe, civil action, buffalo creek, elements of style -- and now, with only a few weeks left, am trying to get a general sense of the concepts in the first semester's classes.  a friend of mine sent me lexisnexus's understanding law school, which has (very) introductory chapters detailing each class, and now i am looking into some e & es, just having finished civil procedure.  while i am sure there is merit to delving further into each subject, i really just want a basic knowledge of my first semester courses.  if for no other reason to give myself a bit of confidence.  plus, i don't really have anything better to do with my time as well. ;)

casino



slacker

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Re: What E&E books schould I get?
« Reply #28 on: July 24, 2005, 11:35:16 AM »
Your strategy might also vary by class, depending on the way the class is taught. One of the civ pro profs at my school spent the first month or so on one case, going through the procedural matters. My prof, by comparison, went through the evolution of jurisdiction using different cases.

Similarly, in crim law, we had a casebook with a lot of note material that the professor would refer to. Another professor spent a lot of time on a single case, going through different concepts.

I think the E&E's are good to give you an idea on language and concepts; esp. if they're entirely new to you.

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Re: What E&E books schould I get?
« Reply #29 on: July 29, 2005, 03:57:24 PM »
Are there any subjects you already know you dislike/don't understand?

I'm currently reading the Torts E&E because I've already taken two torts class and found them boring and confusing at the same time. I figure any heads up I can get will help.

The E&E primers have helped me to confirm that I hate Civil Procedure and am am not too crazy about Criminal Law either.

Contracts and Torts are okay, and Property is a bit tricky, but more or less enjoyable.

For those of you who haven't learned to hate Civ Pro yet, I hope you feel the same way after chap 11.
 

Civ. Pro put me to sleep. I wish I was planning on having children-instead of sending them to their rooms I'd make them read Civ. Pro. cases.