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Author Topic: What E&E books schould I get?  (Read 4274 times)

lsatposter

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What E&E books schould I get?
« on: July 20, 2005, 11:45:47 AM »
So its a month before LS, which E&E books should I get and read before the first day of classes? What author? Which subjects? etc...
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lsatposter

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Re: What E&E books schould I get?
« Reply #1 on: July 20, 2005, 12:14:13 PM »
C'mon....someone...?
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slacker

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Re: What E&E books schould I get?
« Reply #2 on: July 20, 2005, 01:56:52 PM »
Which classes are you taking first semester? Seems like a pretty self-evident answer to me.

CajunDynamo

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Re: What E&E books schould I get?
« Reply #3 on: July 20, 2005, 02:04:07 PM »
So its a month before LS, which E&E books should I get and read before the first day of classes? What author? Which subjects? etc...

Hi,

According to Law School Confidential (2004 edition; pg 114-115), it recommends E&E for Civil Procedure and for Torts.

Hope this helps.

CD

wildcataz2004

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Re: What E&E books schould I get?
« Reply #4 on: July 20, 2005, 02:40:40 PM »
But don't read them unless you have those classes your first semester

lsatposter

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Re: What E&E books schould I get?
« Reply #5 on: July 20, 2005, 02:45:35 PM »
Believe it or not, I have no idea what courses I'm taking 1st semester! I just emailed my orientation advisor about it.
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ginthailand

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Re: What E&E books schould I get?
« Reply #6 on: July 20, 2005, 03:00:24 PM »
Well, you'll probably be taking the same courses as most 1Ls, with possible exceptions:

Torts (Get Glannon's E&E primer...excellent)
Civil Procedure (Again, get Glannon)
Property (The E&E primer is good, but others are good as well)
Contracts (Get Blum's E&E primer)

Here are the possible exceptions:

Criminal Law (May be second semester...the E&E primer for this is OK)
Constitutional Law (May be second semester, or not required...don't know about the E&E primer for this subject)
Criminal Procedure (May be a second year course at your institution, E&E primer is OK)

For now, get the first four.  Actually, to prep, you probably should have started several months ago.  However, PLSII has an abbreviated prep schedule you can follow.
"If there is any fixed star in our constitutional constellation, it is that no official, high or petty, can prescribe what shall be orthodox in politics, nationalism, religion, or other matters of opinion or force citizens to confess by word or act their faith therein." - Justice Robert Jackson

lsatposter

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Re: What E&E books schould I get?
« Reply #7 on: July 20, 2005, 03:30:52 PM »
Hey I know, but honestly, I'm doing this simply to get the jist. Everyone I talk to says take it easy. I read a Conn Law Case Book for fun as it is and I'm reading Getting to Maybe. I currently write legal briefs at my job, so I think I'm in ok shape. I just want to put down some early sketch work
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Contract2008

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Re: What E&E books schould I get?
« Reply #8 on: July 20, 2005, 03:54:20 PM »
I have read several chapters of E&E's Contract and they all seem common sense.  Offer, consideration, acceptance, bilateral, unilateral contracts, etc... oh.. com'on..didn't we learn those in some cheesy class at grade school?   

slacker

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Re: What E&E books schould I get?
« Reply #9 on: July 20, 2005, 06:42:26 PM »
From the northwestern university website:

First Year Curriculum

The first-year curriculum consists of 24 credits of required classes and 6 credits of electives. To encourage participation, half of all first-year classes are taught in sections of 60 or fewer students.

Your first year of study at Northwestern will focus on building a solid foundation in legal reasoning, analysis, and writing, as well as a thorough understanding of the structures and policies of the law.

Teamwork and communication skills are also strongly emphasized in classes such as Communication and Legal Reasoning, a required year-long course in which students collaborate on analytical exercises and group projects. Part of this class involves participation in the Arlyn Miner First-Year Moot Court.

Another supplement to your first-year education is the Lawyer as Problem Solver program. Faculty and legal professionals teach this mandatory seminar, in which students learn how to facilitate problem solving for clients in settings outside the courtroom or boardroom.

At the end of the year, you may apply for a position on one of the Law School’s scholarly journals. Selection is based on a writing competition, first-year grades, and a publishable note or comment on a legal topic.


Required Courses
The following required first-year courses provide a basic foundation in law and legal reasoning:

CIVIL PROCEDURE (4 credits) focuses on the rules that structure federal and state civil litigation.

COMMUNICATION AND LEGAL REASONING (2 credits per semester) offers instruction in legal reasoning, research, writing, and oral argument, as well as exercises to encourage teamwork and collaboration. Classes are often facilitated by guest speakers and panelists.

CONSTITUTIONAL LAW (3 credits) provides a general introduction to the U.S. Constitution's allocation of power between the branches of the federal government and to the grants of and limitations on the substantive powers of the government.

CONTRACTS (4 credits) explores the nature and enforceability of promises and bargains and the remedies available for non-performance.

CRIMINAL LAW (3 credits) emphasizes the general principles of criminal liability and examines the elements and defenses of the laws that criminalize behavior.

PROPERTY (3 credits) examines the philosophical origins of property rights, and the rules that govern the acquisition and transfer of property rights, and the private and public means of the regulation of property.

TORTS (3 credits) explores the policies and rules of the private law system that provide compensation for injuries to persons and property.

+ electives

It's not like this info is hidden.