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What does "study your ass off" mean?

What does "study your ass off" mean?
« on: July 17, 2005, 08:12:24 PM »
This is a really stupid question, but I'm wondering what most of the people who scored in the high 160s and above mean when they say they studied their ass off?  Does it entail doing countless problems and reviewing the ones they missed to understand why?  I guess I'm just having a little bit of trouble understanding how to learn from my mistakes.  I'll look at a problem I missed and understand why I missed it, but not quite sure how to take it forward.  Anyone else have the same problem? 

Brett McKay

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Re: What does "study your ass off" mean?
« Reply #1 on: July 17, 2005, 08:16:11 PM »
I'm in the same boat. After each test I go over my answers and I can see why I got it wrong, but it seems I can't carry it over to other practice tests. I'm studying about 2-3 hours each day and I have seen some improvement, but I find myself making the same stupid mistakes.

Re: What does "study your ass off" mean?
« Reply #2 on: July 17, 2005, 09:52:16 PM »
Thanks for your descriptions.  Same here.

mikeb

Re: What does "study your ass off" mean?
« Reply #3 on: July 17, 2005, 10:33:54 PM »
It's all too much of a reality for me too....

But I will agree, I bought a book from the princeton review and I did notice some improvement.

Maybe some people just have it and some don't?

I don't know, We'll be alright.

practiceboy02

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Re: What does "study your ass off" mean?
« Reply #4 on: July 18, 2005, 07:29:34 AM »
I don't really "study" - I just go to class and do the homework and the improvement comes naturally

Re: What does "study your ass off" mean?
« Reply #5 on: July 18, 2005, 09:10:24 AM »
This is a really stupid question, but I'm wondering what most of the people who scored in the high 160s and above mean when they say they studied their ass off?  Does it entail doing countless problems and reviewing the ones they missed to understand why?  I guess I'm just having a little bit of trouble understanding how to learn from my mistakes.  I'll look at a problem I missed and understand why I missed it, but not quite sure how to take it forward.  Anyone else have the same problem? 

Make sure you are looking at the right answer and grasping why it is right as well as why your answer choice is wrong.  I also tried to think about what I learned in a more abstract sense by looking for how this type of mistake maps applies to questions of that type generally.

I used a spreadsheet to help with this. I would mark how many of each question type (assumption, weaken, parallel, etc.) I had missed. After two or three tests (or lots of practice problems in general) you will probably start to notice a trend of where your weakness lies. There is probably some pattern of faulty reasoning you are making repeatedly so it would be helpful to go back through those questions and see what that pattern is.

Re: What does "study your ass off" mean?
« Reply #6 on: July 18, 2005, 12:21:17 PM »
Quick question, Wilcox - I have been using your method (mapping out how many of each type of problem I was getting wrong), but then I wondered how to deal with the fact that there may be more of certain types of questions on the tests. Did you adjust your numbers to reflect that? I can see that I'm getting more type 3 (TM) questions wrong, but couldn't this be due to the fact that there are simply more of them on the test?

Re: What does "study your ass off" mean?
« Reply #7 on: July 18, 2005, 01:36:12 PM »
Quick question, Wilcox - I have been using your method (mapping out how many of each type of problem I was getting wrong), but then I wondered how to deal with the fact that there may be more of certain types of questions on the tests. Did you adjust your numbers to reflect that? I can see that I'm getting more type 3 (TM) questions wrong, but couldn't this be due to the fact that there are simply more of them on the test?

I didn't account for question frequency because I was more interested in studying than devising a perfect system. Whether type 3 shows up more or not doesn't matter in some ways. If it is the question type you are missing the most frequently, then it is the Q type that is costing you the most points on your LSAT. Improving on it can only help you.

Re: What does "study your ass off" mean?
« Reply #8 on: July 18, 2005, 02:07:01 PM »
Excellent point!

ProfessorPlum

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Re: What does "study your ass off" mean?
« Reply #9 on: July 18, 2005, 04:39:19 PM »
Jwilcox, did you take an initial diagnostic, and if so, would you mind sharing your score?

I think the technique of understanding why our incorrect answer choices are wrong is just as important as understanding why the credited response is correct.  I also try to keep in mind that every question on the LSAT is looking for the best answer, not just an answer that would work.